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BenQ W1070 : DLP Full HD, 3D Ready with lens-shift for 1000$ - Page 115

post #3421 of 8544
Quote:
Originally Posted by rwestley View Post

I just received the 3D Active DLP glasses from Dimensional Optics. They are the same as the True Depth but are $20 cheaper for two. The glasses even have the same model number on them. They also come with a nice hard case and with AC USB power adapters with a case. The True Depth's do not include AC adapters or cases. If anyone is interested in these glasses I suggest that you call Dimensional Optics directly and ask for the new 144K version. Also ask for free shipping on two or more pairs. Amazon also sells them but they may still have the old ones that does not support 144K . Dimensional Optics just received the new ones on Monday I was told.

I have briefly compared them to the Benq glasses and they are very close in blocking the red flash. They also seem to hold the sync quite well in my dark room and are about half the price of the Benq's. They are much more comfortable over glasses that other pairs I have tried especially the Benq's So far I like them the best and I have tried 5 brands so far. They cost $99.95 for two pairs shipped priority mail but the quality difference and comfort are worth the difference for me compared to the Sansonic or OKBA I highly recommend them.
Edited by rwestley - Today at 5:51 pm

Are you using the 3Active glasses for BD 24p? Don't see any mention of them being 144hz capable. Even on Dimensional Optics' own site, they only list them as being compatible with The BenQ W7000.
post #3422 of 8544
If you want good reviews at CNET, then you read a Dave Katzmeier or Geoffrey Morrison review. They are outstanding and know their stuff.

Ty Pendelbury...? Not so much.
post #3423 of 8544
I'm thinking of getting a w1070 for my theater room, it is a light controlled room with dark blue flat walls and ceiling. My screen with be 84 inches. What screen gain would you guys recommend? I will be using it for 3d and 2d movie viewing. I was thinking of just a 1.0 gain but I'm worried about the brightness in 3d.
post #3424 of 8544
Quote:
Originally Posted by seafan View Post

I'm looking for a projector mounted in the ceiling of a media room, BenQ W1070 is on the top of my short list. Using the projector calculator, it shows that for 125" screen, with 10ft ceiling, 2'8" from floor to screen bottom, the projector should be mounted at 10'5" from the screen at 1x zoom, which is right above the front row seat where I'll be sitting. the room is 17ft long with pre-built conduit and outlet for the projector, which is closer to 14ft from screen. If I mount the projector 13ft from screen to avoid longer exposed cable and power cord, and to avoid noise from the projector right above my head, to get the same size picture, I would need to use 1.25 x zoom of the projector (the max zoom is 1.3). Would that degrade image quality (by pushing zoom almost to its max)?

 

thanks,

 

Jason

 

 

I see my question got buried quickly by other posts, here it is again, please help.

post #3425 of 8544
Quote:
Originally Posted by Adamd View Post

I'm thinking of getting a w1070 for my theater room, it is a light controlled room with dark blue flat walls and ceiling. My screen with be 84 inches. What screen gain would you guys recommend? I will be using it for 3d and 2d movie viewing. I was thinking of just a 1.0 gain but I'm worried about the brightness in 3d.

I'd say 1.0 to a max of 1.3, because of your concern for 3D. This PJ is plenty bright in my non-darkened gaming environment, so in a light controlled situation with dark walls, I can't see gain to be a necessity. A grey screen with a gain of .8 is mostly to compensate for ambient light (which is what I use it for)
post #3426 of 8544
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ted99 View Post

I'd say 1.0 to a max of 1.3, because of your concern for 3D. This PJ is plenty bright in my non-darkened gaming environment, so in a light controlled situation with dark walls, I can't see gain to be a necessity. A grey screen with a gain of .8 is mostly to compensate for ambient light (which is what I use it for)

A 1.0 screen is the best way to go in your situation. The proj. is very bright and with a 1.0 mat screen there will not be any hotspots.
post #3427 of 8544
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stuntman_Mike View Post

Are you using the 3Active glasses for BD 24p? Don't see any mention of them being 144hz capable. Even on Dimensional Optics' own site, they only list them as being compatible with The BenQ W7000.

Yes. Most of the Blu-Ray's I use project in 1080P/24 They work fine. These 3D Activve ones are from new stock and work with the 1070 144K. . Contact them and let them know that you need the 144kz glasses. They are the same as the True Depth and come with the hard cases and power adapters. They also are $20 cheaper for two pairs.
These glasses even have the same model number on them as the True-Depths. Get them only from Demensional Optics since Amazon does not have the new stock yet. They just got the new ones in on Monday. Demensional Optics also offers free shipping on two pairs but you must ask for it. Since they just got them in I guess they have not updated their site yet.

I spent two hours doing A/B tests comparing them to the new Benq's and I feel that they are just as good at half the price. They are also rechargeable. I am really pleased that they block the red flash.
Edited by rwestley - 3/21/13 at 8:17am
post #3428 of 8544
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ted99 View Post

I'd say 1.0 to a max of 1.3, because of your concern for 3D. This PJ is plenty bright in my non-darkened gaming environment, so in a light controlled situation with dark walls, I can't see gain to be a necessity. A grey screen with a gain of .8 is mostly to compensate for ambient light (which is what I use it for)

I have the W1080ST - - which is essentially the same projector. I have a 1.3 screen in my "man cave" in the basement. I do not find it too bright at all.

I use Smart Eco, Standard (over Cinema - I just like the colors better), Cool, Brilliant Color with brightness at 47 and contrast at 35. I know everyone has different preferences but I do not find this projector too bright, at all, at these settings.

One comment - - the PQ is better in a dark room and the light that is reflected off the screen makes it easy to move around.
post #3429 of 8544
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stuntman_Mike View Post

If you want good reviews at CNET, then you read a Dave Katzmeier or Geoffrey Morrison review. They are outstanding and know their stuff.

Ty Pendelbury...? Not so much.

I like Katzmier's writing style but his recommendations on "settings" for my Sammy 65" LCD/LED were God awful.

Geoffrey Morrison provides the best insight and unbiased reviews - - IMHO.
post #3430 of 8544
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ricoflashback View Post

I have the W1080ST - - which is essentially the same projector. I have a 1.3 screen in my "man cave" in the basement. I do not find it too bright at all.

I use Smart Eco, Standard (over Cinema - I just like the colors better), Cool, Brilliant Color with brightness at 47 and contrast at 35. I know everyone has different preferences but I do not find this projector too bright, at all, at these settings.

One comment - - the PQ is better in a dark room and the light that is reflected off the screen makes it easy to move around.

You probably don't like Cinema because the colors are muted. I haven't measured yet, going to do a full cal either Friday or Saturday night now that I have logged some good hours on the projector, but I can tell that there is some weird stuff going on with Standard lol.

Cinema, User 1, and User 2 are all exactly the same. The colors seem more accurate than those of Standard and, obviously, Dynamic though. Do this. Use either Cinema, User 1 or User 2, your choice, use Warm color temp, go into the Advanced section of Picture and then go into CMS and increase the saturation for each color by 5 or 6 and see if that looks better. You will get more saturation but it will still look better than Standard.
Edited by Stuntman_Mike - 3/21/13 at 8:37am
post #3431 of 8544
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ricoflashback View Post

I like Katzmier's writing style but his recommendations on "settings" for my Sammy 65" LCD/LED were God awful.

Geoffrey Morrison provides the best insight and unbiased reviews - - IMHO.

Probably not his fault.

I'd guess that you like more Dynamic (unrealistic) looking modes with more vivid colors, so his settings, which get him a reference quality picture, probably aren't enjoyable to you. Just a guess, but based on you saying that you use a Cool color temp, I think it's a good one lol.

The other thing is that even with the same model TV, you can't use someone else's calibrated settings. You can sometimes do more harm than good, believe it or not.
Edited by Stuntman_Mike - 3/21/13 at 8:38am
post #3432 of 8544
Quote:
Originally Posted by rwestley View Post

Yes. Most of the Blu-Ray's I use project in 1080P/24 They work fine. These 3D Activve ones are from new stock and work with the 1070 144K. . Contact them and let them know that you need the 144kz glasses. They are the same as the True Depth and come with the hard cases and power adapters. They also are $20 cheaper for two pairs.
These glasses even have the same model number on them as the True-Depths. Get them only from Demensional Optics since Amazon does not have the new stock yet. They just got the new ones in on Monday. Demensional Optics also offers free shipping on two pairs but you must ask for it. Since they just got them in I guess they have not updated their site yet.

I spent two hours doing A/B tests comparing them to the new Benq's and I feel that they are just as good at half the price. They are also rechargeable. I am really pleased that they block the red flash.

Thanks for the info.

Curious. Have you tried the new 3DTV Corp glasses that are compatible with 144hz. Just curious how they compare in terms of loss of synch and Red Flash blocking.

BTW, they are called 3Active not 3D Active lol. No big deal, but I had the damndest time trying to find them based on 3D Active, and others may as well.

Thanks again for the info.
post #3433 of 8544
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stuntman_Mike View Post

Thanks for the info.

Curious. Have you tried the new 3DTV Corp glasses that are compatible with 144hz. Just curious how they compare in terms of loss of synch and Red Flash blocking.

BTW, they are called 3Active not 3D Active lol. No big deal, but I had the damndest time trying to find them based on 3D Active, and others may as well.

Thanks again for the info.


Sorry for my error in the post. I should have been more careful. They are indeed 3Active from Dimensional Optics. I do plan to try the 3DTV glasses. I tried the old rechargeable ones which did not support 144k and had to send them back. The non-rechargeable ones look the same as the Monoprice glasses and do support 144k. The superlight red rechargeable ones they sell look just like the black OKBA glasses. So far the Benq and the 3Active (True-Depth) block the red flash the best and synch quite will.
post #3434 of 8544
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stuntman_Mike View Post

Probably not his fault.

I'd guess that you like more Dynamic (unrealistic) looking modes with more vivid colors, so his settings, which get him a reference quality picture, probably aren't enjoyable to you. Just a guess, but based on you saying that you use a Cool color temp, I think it's a good one lol.

The other thing is that even with the same model TV, you can't use someone else's calibrated settings. You can sometimes do more harm than good, believe it or not.

Not really. And your choice of the word "unrealistic" is really not apropos. And the "Dynamic" setting looks terrible on the BenQ. In fact, there is only one TV that it looked good on - - a six year old Samsung LCD - - so sometimes, different settings can work - - you just have to be open minded to see what works best for your eyes.

I'm continually amazed at the so called "purists" that will reject anyone's notion of what a good picture is to them and harp on "accurate" and "calibrated" settings as the be all, end all, end of discussion when it comes to picture quality. I used the "Cinema" setting extensively for the past week on my BenQ W1080ST and just didn't like the skin tones and lack of pop in the picture. The same with taking off "Brilliant Colors." And the "Warm" temperature just looks too faded for my taste. I'm also viewing everything through a Pioneer SC65 with Marvell QDEO processing.

In the end, I'll always trust my eyes and try to learn from forums like AVS on what works and what doesn't.

You're right in that using someone else's settings will not give you the same results. But it can give you a reference point to start from if you a dissatisfied with your PQ and you want to try something else without paying for a full, blown calibration. Down the road, I'll learn about the technology to do the calibration myself (probably using Chromapure) - - but in the end, if the 100% to calibration doesn't look good to my eyes, it will be changed.

And nothing against Katzmaier - - except for the God awful setting he posted that took fifteen minutes to load and looked like someone sprayed a film over your screen. But that's o.k. - - it was worth trying the settings to see if they worked on my set.

Regarding: 3DTV Corp(2 Pairs )The most recent upgraded super light rechargeable DLP-Link 3d glasses(NOT for use with External IR emitters) OK for BenQ 1070 , compatible with Benq D3

I bought through Amazon. The only payment option I found on 3DTV Corp's site was PayPal. Plus it was cheaper to go the Amazon route and if any problems, you can return them with their fabulous policy.

www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00BJAQBGC/ref=oh_details_o00_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
post #3435 of 8544
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ricoflashback View Post

Not really. And your choice of the word "unrealistic" is really not apropos. And the "Dynamic" setting looks terrible on the BenQ. In fact, there is only one TV that it looked good on - - a six year old Samsung LCD - - so sometimes, different settings can work - - you just have to be open minded to see what works best for your eyes.

I'm continually amazed at the so called "purists" that will reject anyone's notion of what a good picture is to them and harp on "accurate" and "calibrated" settings as the be all, end all, end of discussion when it comes to picture quality. I used the "Cinema" setting extensively for the past week on my BenQ W1080ST and just didn't like the skin tones and lack of pop in the picture. The same with taking off "Brilliant Colors." And the "Warm" temperature just looks too faded for my taste. I'm also viewing everything through a Pioneer SC65 with Marvell QDEO processing.

In the end, I'll always trust my eyes and try to learn from forums like AVS on what works and what doesn't.

You're right in that using someone else's settings will not give you the same results. But it can give you a reference point to start from if you a dissatisfied with your PQ and you want to try something else without paying for a full, blown calibration. Down the road, I'll learn about the technology to do the calibration myself (probably using Chromapure) - - but in the end, if the 100% to calibration doesn't look good to my eyes, it will be changed.

And nothing against Katzmaier - - except for the God awful setting he posted that took fifteen minutes to load and looked like someone sprayed a film over your screen. But that's o.k. - - it was worth trying the settings to see if they worked on my set.

Regarding: 3DTV Corp(2 Pairs )The most recent upgraded super light rechargeable DLP-Link 3d glasses(NOT for use with External IR emitters) OK for BenQ 1070 , compatible with Benq D3

I bought through Amazon. The only payment option I found on 3DTV Corp's site was PayPal. Plus it was cheaper to go the Amazon route and if any problems, you can return them with their fabulous policy.

www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00BJAQBGC/ref=oh_details_o00_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

not to beat a dead horse but, you cant trust your eyes. thats why its AV Science. no matter how good you think your system looks or sounds, if there are no measurements and nothing to calibrate against, it doesnt really mean much.

its a lot like throwing a good sub woofer in a corner without measuring anything and determining it sucks based on what your hearing. not knowing there are big peaks and nulls in the response, the phase is off, etc.

i use the Disney WOW calibration disc for my video. i think it gives great results. are they "dead on accurate"? no, but they are close enough for me without paying a bunch of money. its a great $25 investment. you can always tweak after that, but at least you have a reference to start with
post #3436 of 8544
Before you go changing settings randomly to slightly adjust to how your eyes like the image, well OPTIMALLY you would need to start at a reference level calibration.

It is not NECESSARILY wrong to POST-ADJUST the image after a calibration to your own liking (sharpness, color saturation, whatever), but you should have one mode in the projector calibrated if possible. I understand it is too expensive for some of you to calibrate a sub-$1000 projector with decent equipment (like a D3 + ChromaPure), but it's still nice to do if you can.

It just makes more sense. Some movies were just shot poorly or have issues and you could in some cases improve the image by post-adjusting away from a calibrated image. However, in most cases it's easier just to leave it alone, but possibly change the GAMMA slightly on a movie as some movies have bad gamma mastering causing problems.

As far as what looks right BY EYE, well that is SORT OF impossible because most movies are not filmed with neutral D65 overhead lighting. The neutral white point is actually only if the camera is perfectly balanced itself (or post-corrected in editing) such as being filming outside under the noon-day sun (or using a non-natural D65 source). Furthermore, you are only adjusting what looks right in that one scene even if you are watching "perfectly filmed" reference level D65 color neutral whitepoint camera work.

I said some confusing things there, but basically:

1) I wrote a post for newbies / layman people to easily understand how the color works on our projectors:
http://www.avsforum.com/t/1298652/viewsonic-pro8200-it-exists/660#post_22294228

2) If you don't have calibration equipment, then at least use the AVS Rec 709 Disk which is a free download from this Forum. Some other disks you can purchase include the Disney one, the Spears and Munsil, and the DVE calibration disk. I own all of these except the Disney one (well probably have that one just never used it). Use these disks to do whatever you can, but you won't be able to get the color perfect without calibration equipment.

3) After Step 1, just do whatever you want to the image, who cares smile.gif

4) Eventually buy calibration equipment and do it right, then hit yourself and say DOH!
post #3437 of 8544
Didn't mean to open a can of worms, nor did I mean to insult anyone.

I said unrealistic matter of factly, because they are, in fact unrealistic. Wasn't trying to zing you or anything and didn't mean it as a put down. You can watch your TV/PJ how ever you want. You paid for it lol.

I was just trying to offer suggestions. I too, think that default Cinema/User1/User2 are all too undersaturated. The colors are more accurate, I'm pretty sure anyway, out of the box, as compared to Standard. You can increase the saturation of any of those other 3 modes to your liking, but it should look better, because it will still be more accurate. With Warm temp anyway.

We have all been there. I used to love watching my Sony Wega Trinitron tube on Vivid cool temp with as much EE as you could shake a stick at. I hated how a "realistic" picture looked. After getting more into TVS and then doing calibrations myself, it truly does look much, much better to me than my old way of watching ever did, and I can't believe that I ever watched it that way.

Try my suggestion. If you don't like it as much as Standard, there is nothing preventing you from switching back. Again, it's your PJ.

Just trying to pass on info that was passed on to me in the hopes that you enjoy your TV/PJ even more. I know I do. If it weren't for other people telling me what I was missing, I never would have known.
post #3438 of 8544
Guy's it is probably a good idea to just keep the debate on calibration merit out of the thread as that discussion usually gets ugly and we don't need to beat a dead horse. wink.gif

Jason
post #3439 of 8544
Quote:
Originally Posted by coderguy View Post

Before you go changing settings randomly to slightly adjust to how your eyes like the image, well OPTIMALLY you would need to start at a reference level calibration.

It is not NECESSARILY wrong to POST-ADJUST the image after a calibration to your own liking (sharpness, color saturation, whatever), but you should have one mode in the projector calibrated if possible. I understand it is too expensive for some of you to calibrate a sub-$1000 projector with decent equipment (like a D3 + ChromaPure), but it's still nice to do if you can.

It just makes more sense. Some movies were just shot poorly or have issues and you could in some cases improve the image by post-adjusting away from a calibrated image. However, in most cases it's easier just to leave it alone, but possibly change the GAMMA slightly on a movie as some movies have bad gamma mastering causing problems.

As far as what looks right BY EYE, well that is SORT OF impossible because most movies are not filmed with neutral D65 overhead lighting. The neutral white point is actually only if the camera is perfectly balanced itself (or post-corrected in editing) such as being filming outside under the noon-day sun (or using a non-natural D65 source). Furthermore, you are only adjusting what looks right in that one scene even if you are watching "perfectly filmed" reference level D65 color neutral whitepoint camera work.

I said some confusing things there, but basically:

1) I wrote a post for newbies / layman people to easily understand how the color works on our projectors:
http://www.avsforum.com/t/1298652/viewsonic-pro8200-it-exists/660#post_22294228

2) If you don't have calibration equipment, then at least use the AVS Rec 709 Disk which is a free download from this Forum. Some other disks you can purchase include the Disney one, the Spears and Munsil, and the DVE calibration disk. I own all of these except the Disney one (well probably have that one just never used it). Use these disks to do whatever you can, but you won't be able to get the color perfect without calibration equipment.

3) After Step 1, just do whatever you want to the image, who cares smile.gif

4) Eventually buy calibration equipment and do it right, then hit yourself and say DOH!

Thanks Coderguy - much appreciated. I understand the point of "reference level calibration" and do appreciate the science behind it and will eventually calibrate myself.

My main point was and will always be - - a 100% accurate calibration does not 100% equate to the best picture quality in the viewer's eye - -albeit subjective. The forums are littered with folks who have spent big dollars on a calibration and the results were not what they expected - - i.e. unsatisfied!

And I won't go into the "Best Buy" or "Geek Squad" calibrators because they, in my estimation and from everything I've read, are really not a professional calibration compared to fine folks out there they spend a couple hours or more to fine tune the PQ. Not trying to be negative towards Best Buy - - just from what I've read.

Lastly - - the main benefit of the forums (thanks AVS!!!) is to exchange ideas, understand your TV or projector better and to squeeze the last ounce of PQ quality you can get - - especially if you can't afford a truly professional calibration. The reference to Katzmaier's settings for my Samsung was an attempt to correct what was, initially, "out of the box" lousy settings from Samsung - - which they have corrected with multiple firmware updates and now, I keep everything pretty much "Default" and the PQ is amazing.

I've used the WOW disk and it helps - - but I'm waiting when I can spend the time to learn and calibrate myself - - which is not easy but will be rewarding.
post #3440 of 8544
well, speaking of calibrating ourselves. did they fix the ISF setting not saving yet? is this on all units or just a few?
post #3441 of 8544
Quote:
Originally Posted by brian6751 View Post

well, speaking of calibrating ourselves. did they fix the ISF setting not saving yet? is this on all units or just a few?

Not sure if they did, but even if they didn't, that wouldn't hinder you from doing a calibration.

The White Balance and CMS controls are all in the user menu for every Picture mode of the Projector. There really isn't any reason to use the ISF mode at all.
post #3442 of 8544
Quote:
Originally Posted by brian6751 View Post

well, speaking of calibrating ourselves. did they fix the ISF setting not saving yet? is this on all units or just a few?

Unless you have the ISF password to unlock it you cannot access the ISF calibration controls. This is not to be mistaken for the CMS which is full accessible by everyone.

It is claimed the ISF save fix has been released with firmware 1.05.

Jason
post #3443 of 8544
post #3444 of 8544
ISF password is: up, down, up, down, left, right. In the service manual that was posted earlier.
post #3445 of 8544
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ricoflashback View Post

Thanks Coderguy - much appreciated. I understand the point of "reference level calibration" and do appreciate the science behind it and will eventually calibrate myself.

My main point was and will always be - - a 100% accurate calibration does not 100% equate to the best picture quality in the viewer's eye - -albeit subjective. The forums are littered with folks who have spent big dollars on a calibration and the results were not what they expected - - i.e. unsatisfied!

I've used the WOW disk and it helps - - but I'm waiting when I can spend the time to learn and calibrate myself - - which is not easy but will be rewarding.

I agree, besides calibrating THIS projector isn't even as important as it was on older projectors. On some of the older projectors people's faces were pink and purple OOTB literally.
Close enough for govt if you tweak it as-is.

Not to mention calibrating it yourself would just cause headaches and cost more money if you've never done it before. I wasn't inferring to start a debate, I was just posting everyone's options if they did want to calibrate it. One reason I've actually been pointing people to this projector is because it has decent OOTB settings, though calibrating still helps some.
post #3446 of 8544
Quote:
Originally Posted by brian6751 View Post

What's the best way to attach these filters?

i bought a 67mm lens filter. it fits into the grooves but not snug. not secure at all. ho do you guys secure these filters?
post #3447 of 8544
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nimoy View Post

ISF password is: up, down, up, down, left, right. In the service manual that was posted earlier.

Ah, good catch! wink.gif

* Too bad they don't stick for those of us on 1.04.

Jason
post #3448 of 8544
Well I'm going to attempt a firmware upgrade shortly. I'm armed with a USB to rs 232 cable so hopefully should be able to restore the settings also. Wish me luck.
post #3449 of 8544
Good luck! you're doing us all a service brave soldier!
post #3450 of 8544
ok how the heck do you turn on 3d on this machine ?

I cant get into the menu to turn 3d on to auto. i have it hooked up to a ps3 and am trying to play a movie and it keeps saying it isnt connected to a 3d display
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