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Disney buys Lucasfilm! - Page 3

post #61 of 476
Always fun to dig som stuff from wikipedia.
Quote:
Abandonment of sequel trilogy (1997–2012)

In publicity interviews relating to the release of the 1997 Special Editions of Episodes IV to VI and the planned Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace, Lucas began to convey that it was unlikely that he would make the sequel trilogy. At a 1997 Special Edition press conference Lucas remarked, "[E]veryone said, 'Well, are you going to do sequels to the first three?' But that was an afterthought; I don't have scripts on those stories. The only notion on that was, wouldn't it be fun to get all the actors to come back when they're 60 or 70 years old and make three more about them as old people. That's how far that has gone, but the first six will definitely get finished."[13] In a 1997 issue of Star Wars Insider, Lucas said, "The whole story has six episodes.... If I ever went beyond that, it would be something that was made up. I really don't have any notion other than, 'Gee, it would be interesting to do Luke Skywalker later on.' It wouldn't be part of the main story, but a sequel to this thing."[23] In an online Q&A hosted by Leonard Maltin and published in December 1997, Lucas was asked "Will we ever get to see Episodes 7, 8 and 9?", to which he answered, "Right at this moment, the answer is no. Once the prequel trilogy is complete I plan to put Star Wars on the shelf and walk away from it for good. There are many other kinds of films I would like to make."[24]

This was confirmed in an interview Lucas gave to Vanity Fair, published in its February 1999 issue. "When you see it in six parts, you'll understand," he said. "It really ends at part six." He added, "I never had a story for the sequels, for the later ones."[25][26][27] (In 2008, after all six films had been released, Lucas clarified that it was the resolution of the Anakin Skywalker / Luke Skywalker storyline that represented the saga's end: "The movies were the story of Anakin Skywalker and Luke Skywalker, and when Luke saves the galaxy and redeems his father, that's where that story ends."[28]) Asked about the possibility of someone else making Star Wars films, Lucas said, "Probably not, it's my thing."[25][26][27] In August 1999, at a press conference in New York City to discuss The Phantom Menace, Lucas was categorical. The following exchange at the press conference was reported by Starlog magazine[29]:


Q: Does that mean you won't do Episodes VII, VIII and IX?
Lucas: I will not do VII, VIII and IX.

Q: You will not? Will they be made by somebody else?

Lucas: No. They will not.

Q: So this trilogy ends it?
Lucas: This is it. This is all there is.
A further comment Lucas made at that 1999 press conference noted the "nine year commitment" required to make a Star Wars trilogy. The theme of the commitment required, and his age, were the subject of his remarks in following years about why his position had changed about the sequel trilogy. In 2002, he described his past answers about the sequels in this way: "Basically what I said as a joke was, 'Maybe when Harrison and Carrie are in their 70s, we'll come back and do another version.' The thing I didn't realize then, and that I do realize now very clearly, is that not only would they be in their 70s, but I would be in my 70s too." In 2007 Lucas described making the films at that age as "An idea that seemed amusing at the time, but doesn't seem realistic now", and suggested that 'off-the-cuff' comments he had made in earlier years about the sequel trilogy had been misconstrued as absolute statements.[30] In relation to his decision to begin work on the prequel trilogy when he did, he also said: "To start Star Wars when you're 65, the chances of finishing it are diminished" (a remark that could equally refer to the sequel trilogy).[31]

As late as January 2012, as part of an interview with The New York Times, discussing negative fan reactions to the prequel trilogy and to alterations made to the original trilogy (such as Ewoks blinking and the bar scene where Greedo now shoots first) Lucas said, regarding further Star Wars films: "Why would I make any more, when everybody yells at you all the time and says what a terrible person you are?"[32]

In an interview published in Total Film in May 2008, Lucas also ruled out anybody else ever making the sequel trilogy (or other future Star Wars features). Asked if he was happy for new Star Wars tales to be told after he was gone, Lucas replied: "I've left pretty explicit instructions for there not to be any more features. There will definitely be no Episodes VII–IX. That's because there isn't any story. I mean, I never thought of anything. And now there have been novels about the events after Episode VI, which isn't at all what I would have done with it. The Star Wars story is really the tragedy of Darth Vader. That is the story. Once Vader dies, he doesn't come back to life, the Emperor doesn't get cloned and Luke doesn't get married..."[33] The phenomenon of the Star Wars 'Expanded Universe', with stories told in novels, comic books and other media, also appears to have been a factor in Lucas seeing no need to produce a sequel trilogy: "Whatever it is that happens afterward, that isn't the core Star Wars story that I like to tell," he said in 2008. "There really isn't any story to tell there. It's been covered in the books and video games and comic books, which are things I think are incredibly creative but that I don't really have anything to do with other than being the person who built the sandbox they're playing in."[28]
post #62 of 476
Thread Starter 
Here's what he had to say a few days ago about future Star Wars movies :


only a fool doesn't change his mind... wink.gif
post #63 of 476
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Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

everything above this is wrong:p

That was actually a very funny response.
post #64 of 476
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Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

I wouldn't count on Fox being too agreeable when it comes to Star Wars. I am sure they have some ill feelings that Lucas didn't bring his deal to them instead of Disney.

Oh, I'd place a large wager that Fox has a bad taste in their mouth about this. But $$$$ has a way of killing that taste when you're talking about Star Wars kind of dough. I just believe that 10 or so years from now Disney will hold quite a bit of leverage to not get Fox to the negotiating table. Fox will still command and demand big dollars and ongoing rights of some form but nothing that Disney can absorb. Heck, it quite possibly might be a situation where Fox decides to sell outright to Disney to take the money and run. That would take an awfully big number though.
post #65 of 476
Quote:
Originally Posted by Closet Geek View Post

Oh, I'd place a large wager that Fox has a bad taste in their mouth about this. But $$$$ has a way of killing that taste when you're talking about Star Wars kind of dough. I just believe that 10 or so years from now Disney will hold quite a bit of leverage to not get Fox to the negotiating table. Fox will still command and demand big dollars and ongoing rights of some form but nothing that Disney can absorb. Heck, it quite possibly might be a situation where Fox decides to sell outright to Disney to take the money and run. That would take an awfully big number though.

And that "awfully big number' could be better spent as far as ROI on making new Star Wars films which is exactly what Disney has in mind for the franchasie.
post #66 of 476
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

And that "awfully big number' could be better spent as far as ROI on making new Star Wars films which is exactly what Disney has in mind for the franchasie.

Oh I agree that is their absolute intent. A "buyout" of Ep IV from Fox would only make sense after the new films are produced, which would also have to be successful. At that point Ep IV would have it's highest value and Fox might be inclined to sell at that point....notice I said might....to which on the other end there would also be value in Disney possessing the complete franchise assets in whole or in part.
post #67 of 476
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lee Stewart View Post

15 Potential Writers for the New 'Star Wars' Films
http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/15-potential-writers-new-star-wars-385434
That makes me realize how many possibilities there are now, as opposed to the rather rigid, calcified situation with Lucas.
post #68 of 476
+1.

The best thing Lucas did were Episodes IV and V, the rest were just plain greed. Glad to see he got his money and move on for good. Not bad for a guy with a one-trick pony.
post #69 of 476
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Originally Posted by dragonbud0 View Post

+1.
The best thing Lucas did were Episodes IV and V, the rest were just plain greed. Glad to see he got his money and move on for good. Not bad for a guy with a one-trick pony.

Dont be so disrespectful.

Lucas is NOT a one trick pony.

Every heard of the Indiana Jones trilogy?
Willow?
THX 1138
Land before time
Kagemusha
Tucker

Lucas is one of the greatest story tellers of the 20th Century.
post #70 of 476
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

Dont be so disrespectful.
Lucas is NOT a one trick pony.
Every heard of the Indiana Jones trilogy?
Willow?
THX 1138
Land before time
Kagemusha
Tucker
Lucas is one of the greatest story tellers of the 20th Century.

I was right there with you until the last sentence.

And you left out probably his best film...
post #71 of 476
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Originally Posted by lonwolf615 View Post

I was right there with you until the last sentence.
And you left out probably his best film...

StarWars and Indiana Jones are HUGE movies.
Tell me who else wrote two bigger franchises for the big screen?
Can you name 10 people? Probably not.
That makes Lucas one of the best story tellers of the 20th century for film.
post #72 of 476

Kagemusha? Really?

post #73 of 476
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Originally Posted by iamian View Post

Kagemusha? Really?
Yeah, Kagamusha really! And if you thought that was good, you should see Rashomon, which is widely regarded as Lucases best movie.
post #74 of 476
and, it's a 3 hour movie! smile.gif
post #75 of 476
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Originally Posted by iamian View Post

Kagemusha? Really?

Lucas was one of the producers of the movie. The other person said Lucas was a one trick pony, so i corrected him. Lucas wrote, directed, or produced many sucessful movies. He is not a one trick pony.
post #76 of 476
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

Lucas wrote, directed, or produced many sucessful movies.
Was Tucker really "successful"? It had a $23 million budget, and grossed less than $20 million. BTW, you're eager to credit Lucas for being a "producer", but you conveniently left out his producing credit for Howard the Duck.
post #77 of 476
An interesting essay from someone I would never have expected:

Camille Paglia Calls George Lucas ‘World’s Greatest Living Artist’

Full artcile here.
Quote:
It’s the first book ever to place George Lucas in the direct line of great artists such as Titian, Bernini, Monet, Picasso, and Jackson Pollock. Paglia’s chapter on Lucas, which surveys his career and analyzes Revenge of the Sith, is the final chapter and climax of the book.

She says, “I was shocked to discover during my research how few serious books there are about Lucas in many university and college libraries, even the ones with collections of film studies. Lucas has been outrageously marginalized—he’s often dismissed as a creator of blockbuster entertainments for children. Also, he’s a very private person who avoids the Hollywood scene. Like any true artist, he doesn’t care about glitz and show—he just focuses on his work.”

Paglia found evidence in many scattered and obscure sources about Lucas’ lifelong orientation as a visual artist. She says, “It’s absolutely scandalous that the art world and art critics have failed to recognize Lucas’ importance and influence as a visual master as well as the creator of a vast mythology that has entranced millions of people for several generations around the world.”

In the introduction to Glittering Images, Paglia writes: “Nothing I saw in the visual arts of the past thirty years was as daring, beautiful, and emotionally compelling as the spectacular volcano-planet climax of Lucas’s Revenge of the Sith.”

It looks like most, if not all, of the essay can be read here.

Some excerpts:
Quote:
Who is the greatest artist of our time? Normally, we would look to literature and the fine arts to make that judgment. But Pop Art's happy marriage to commercial mass media marked the end of an era. The supreme artists of the half century following Jackson Pollock were not painters but innovators who had embraced technology—such as the film director Ingmar Bergman and the singer-songwriter Bob Dylan. During the decades bridging the 20th and 21st centuries, as the fine arts steadily shrank in visibility and importance, only one cultural figure had the pioneering boldness and world impact that we associate with the early masters of avant-garde modernism: George Lucas, an epic filmmaker who turned dazzling new technology into an expressive personal genre.
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No one has closed the gap between art and technology more successfully than George Lucas. In his epochal six-film Star Wars saga, he fused ancient hero legends from East and West with futuristic science fiction and created characters who have entered the dream lives of millions. He constructed a vast, original, self-referential mythology like that of James Macpherson's pseudo-Celtic Ossian poems, which swept Europe in the late 18th century, or the Angria and Gondal story cycle spun by the Brontë children in their isolation in the Yorkshire moors. Lucas was a digital visionary who prophesied and helped shape a host of advances, such as computer-generated imagery; computerized film editing, sound mixing, and virtual set design; high-definition cinematography; fiber-optic transmission of dailies; digital movie duplication and distribution; theater and home-entertainment stereo surround sound; and refinements in video-game graphics, interactivity, and music.
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Criticism of the Star Wars series has centered on its limited female roles and avoidance of sex; its paucity of black actors and its caricatured accents perceived as racist; and its sometimes wooden dialogue. Lucas says, "My films are basically in the graphics": "Everything is visual." He views dialogue as merely "a sound effect, a rhythm, a vocal chorus in the overall soundtrack." In structure, Star Wars unfolds as dynamic action sequences alternating with grand panoramic tableaux, including breathtaking cityscapes stacked with traffic skylanes. Lucas declares, "I'm not really interested in plots." And elsewhere: "To me, the script is just a sketchbook, just a list of notes." Plot details (like the origin of a facial scar) are sometimes supplied from outside the films in the gargantuan cosmos of Star Wars serial cartoons, video games, novels, handbooks, action figures, plastic kits, and Web sites. Lucas's pictorial orientation as a director is unmistakable in his mission statement: "Movies are a mass of objects moving across a large surface." His main task, he says, is to decide where the viewer's eye should be and for how long. Lucas calls digital technology "a new color": "It's a whole different way of making movies. It's painting now; it's not photography anymore."
Quote:
"Expand our universe!" Lucas commands his artists and technicians. He is a man of machines yet a lover of nature, his wily persona of genial blandness masking one of the most powerful and tenacious minds in contemporary culture.

There's a follow up interview with Paglia below, with the Star Wars content starting at about 8:38. Warning: There is some strong language included, and some unrelated political discussion at the end.
post #78 of 476
Quote:
Originally Posted by RobertR View Post

Was Tucker really "successful"? It had a $23 million budget, and grossed less than $20 million. BTW, you're eager to credit Lucas for being a "producer", but you conveniently left out his producing credit for Howard the Duck.

I never said my list was his complete lifes work. I just gave a list to show Lucas was NOT a one trick pony. Tucker was a pretty good movie.
post #79 of 476
Quote:
Originally Posted by srw1000 View Post

An interesting essay from someone I would never have expected:
Camille Paglia Calls George Lucas ‘World’s Greatest Living Artist’
Full artcile here.
It looks like most, if not all, of the essay can be read here.
Some excerpts:
There's a follow up interview with Paglia below, with the Star Wars content starting at about 8:38. Warning: There is some strong language included, and some unrelated political discussion at the end.

You know why Lucas does not get the respect he deserves?

Because he does not play the kiss azz game of hollywood. Its all hollywood politics. Looks who laughing now with $4,000,000,000.
post #80 of 476
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

You know why Lucas does not get the respect he deserves?

He had alot of respect, until somewere between The Extended Editions and The Phantom Menace. After that people saw that his golden days were over.

Now when he have stopped to run Lucasfilm and can concentrate being a artist again, maybe he can reedem himself. Its alot easier when you dont have a large company on your shoulders and have a large amount of cash in your wallet.

Either way, I still salute the guy for the achievements he has done. Star Wars and Indiana Jones were two well needed entries in the world of cinema, and a large part of my childhood.
post #81 of 476
Quote:
Originally Posted by MovieSwede View Post

He had alot of respect, until somewere between The Extended Editions and The Phantom Menace. After that people saw that his golden days were over.
Now when he have stopped to run Lucasfilm and can concentrate being a artist again, maybe he can reedem himself. Its alot easier when you dont have a large company on your shoulders and have a large amount of cash in your wallet.
Either way, I still salute the guy for the achievements he has done. Star Wars and Indiana Jones were two well needed entries in the world of cinema, and a large part of my childhood.

I agree that Lucas did stumble quite a bit lately. But it still should not discount his masterworks of Starwars and Indiana.

He hasn't even gotten an Academy Honorary Award. Even James Earl Jones won the honorary oscar in 2011. Just shows how political the oscars and the media is.
post #82 of 476
THX 1138 opened doors for Lucas from an industry standpoint and American Graffiti put him on the map. But let's face it, Star Wars propelled him into the stratosphere and Indiana Jones kept him there. Throw in the development of ILM and LucasArts, among other entities, and the reality is no one comes close to touching this guy on a whole. Sure, there are better writers, better directors and possibly even better personalities (never met the guy) but what Lucas brought to film making and the big screen can never be denied nor to date is there a close comparison.

With the "one-trick pony' comment, I may be speaking out of turn here but I think the notion here may have been, NONE of Lucas' achievements would have been possible without Star Wars. No way do you go to a studio with a Howard the Duck concept and get it to production without Star Wars clout behind you. There are other "bombs" of note too along with some other decent films written by Lucas. But add Indiana Jones to the mix and basically who's gonna tell you no? Again, this status and clout is possible ONLY because of Star Wars. His one great "trick" allowed him to pull some other things off and takes some risks along the way. Some paid off, some didn't.
post #83 of 476
Quote:
Originally Posted by Closet Geek View Post

THX 1138 opened doors for Lucas from an industry standpoint and American Graffiti put him on the map. But let's face it, Star Wars propelled him into the stratosphere and Indiana Jones kept him there. Throw in the development of ILM and LucasArts, among other entities, and the reality is no one comes close to touching this guy on a whole. Sure, there are better writers, better directors and possibly even better personalities (never met the guy) but what Lucas brought to film making and the big screen can never be denied nor to date is there a close comparison.
With the "one-trick pony' comment, I may be speaking out of turn here but I think the notion here may have been, NONE of Lucas' achievements would have been possible without Star Wars. No way do you go to a studio with a Howard the Duck concept and get it to production without Star Wars clout behind you. There are other "bombs" of note too along with some other decent films written by Lucas. But add Indiana Jones to the mix and basically who's gonna tell you no? Again, this status and clout is possible ONLY because of Star Wars. His one great "trick" allowed him to pull some other things off and takes some risks along the way. Some paid off, some didn't.

but Indiana was his second trick.

The Matrix dudes are one trick ponies. Or even one Movie ponies. Matrix was the only good work they have done.

Lucas is no Wachoscky Brothers (or siblings, I'm confused with the whole situation)
post #84 of 476
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

but Indiana was his second trick.
The Matrix dudes are one trick ponies. Or even one Movie ponies. Matrix was the only good work they have done.
Lucas is no Wachoscky Brothers (or siblings, I'm confused with the whole situation)

Yes, Lucas had a few "tricks" so to speak but few people think of Lucas being associated with anything other than Star Wars at first. Case and point, when the headline "Disney buys Lucasfilm" was posted the first thing everyone thought about was Star Wars. The second thing most thought about was what about the Star Wars revisions. And the third thing was "more Star Wars movies?". I doubt anyone thought "more Indiana Jones (or insert any other GL title here) movies?". Don't get me wrong, I'm actually "arguing" both sides here. Sure, Lucas has done several things or "tricks" if you will. But it's his one world changing biggie that made the difference. The poster basically said $4B isn't a bad deal for one little idea about a farm boy in space. Willow didn't get Lucas $4B, nor did Red Tails, American Graffiti or THX 1138. As a comparison, if I say Spielberg, most likely we will all think of different movies. If this were a Spielberg deal then we'd be talking about a whole lot of movies or tricks if you will. Again, having said all of that, Lucas has also put out some good stories in addition to Star Wars.
post #85 of 476
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sog35 View Post

but Indiana was his second trick.
The Matrix dudes are one trick ponies. Or even one Movie ponies. Matrix was the only good work they have done.
Lucas is no Wachoscky Brothers (or siblings, I'm confused with the whole situation)

The Wachowskis also produced/wrote (or adapted for instance) one of my favorite films V For Vendetta, and well, they just released their new little flick Cloud Atlas. They're 45 and George Lucas is alsmot 70. Their career is far from over so I wouldn't call them one trick ponies just yet.
post #86 of 476
And then there are the Coen Brothers.....
post #87 of 476
Quote:
Originally Posted by srw1000 View Post

An interesting essay from someone I would never have expected:
Camille Paglia Calls George Lucas ‘World’s Greatest Living Artist’

Of course, it must be acknowledged that Camille Paglia is completely wackadoodle. Have you read any of her books? She even describes herself as a "feminist bisexual egomaniac."

Don't get me wrong, I find Paglia's audio commentary for Basic Instinct (which she describes as one of the most profound pieces of art in the history of human endeavor) hugely entertaining. If I hadn't listened to that, I never would have heard the phrase "wet tumescent sexual attraction," and my life would have been poorer for it. smile.gif
post #88 of 476
Mass exodus for the door over in Marin? I've heard that Disney isn't exactly wonderful to work for.
post #89 of 476

Just a FYI, Matrix dudes are no longer the Matrix dudes.

post #90 of 476
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Z View Post

Of course, it must be acknowledged that Camille Paglia is completely wackadoodle. Have you read any of her books? She even describes herself as a "feminist bisexual egomaniac."
I was kind of hoping that posting the links and sections of her essay might have produced more than an ad hominem attack.

But, since you mention it, I found it surprising that a "feminist bisexual egomaniac" would select Lucas as the World's Greatest Living Artist, out of all the other possibilities out there.
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