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New Ruling Confirms Copying DVDs is Illegal - Page 3

post #61 of 491
Quote:
Originally Posted by chevychad View Post

Its also illegal to go 1 mph over the speed limit... rolleyes.gif

The difference is you wont spend 5 years in jail, and $250,000 fine not worth it from my perspective. Plus the only system I would like is Kaleidescape and that is way too much money for me.

The studio now are trying to push ultra violet = Total crap. At least itunes you can download anywhere on Apple TV, Mac, iPod i Pad Iphone....
Edited by wse - 11/1/12 at 4:27pm
post #62 of 491
Quote:
Originally Posted by Veeper View Post

I hate to tell you this jack, but the fact that you're posting here on a computer puts you in the top 1% of the world. Please though, keep enlightening us on this "circle" of wealth.

Veep - The top 1 percent includes people who made many hundreds of millions of dollars and perhaps some with incomes of more than $1 billion, I don't think I'm in that range, yet! In the United States, wealth is highly concentrated in a relatively few hands and those few hands may have something to do with discussions such as these. Regardless, I'm a consumer purchasing retail packaged discs and should be able to make at least one back-up and stream away privately. biggrin.gif
post #63 of 491
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeBlow74 View Post

The law is the law. Deal with it. I am I am not playing devils advocate, but the law is the law. You have to make a decision when you all purchase a movie. Do I buy disk? Do I buy digital? If the big bad movie studio wants to prevent people from ripping movies, stop selling internal and external disk burners. If the major electronics company quits making blank disks and burners the whole issue would be solved.
You do realize that DVD and BluRay burners and disks have legitimate, legal uses too? That was essentially the same argument the studios tried to use to get Beta and VHS banned and the other side also had the same arguments as mine - that videotape could also be used for legitimate uses: recording home movies and non-copyrighted programs, for two.
post #64 of 491
Quote:
Originally Posted by rakuen.now View Post

Ripping a blu-ray as we speak. Oops.

Didn't they say DVDs? Not BDs? biggrin.gif
post #65 of 491
Stupidest thing I ever heard. If I buy the movie I own it. I paid for the right to watch it as I wish, if that means on my PC or my DVD driveless tablet... why can't I ?

Advances in modern electronics make this idea idiotic.

It basically will just put a nail in coffin for disc media.

I don't want to get up and put a disc in as it is since I am lazy - or suffer menu or such and loading times. I imagine this will only promote digital downloading more and further reduce DVD/bluray purchases and movie company profits.
post #66 of 491
Quote:
Originally Posted by wse View Post

The difference is you wont spend 5 years in jail, and $250,000 fine not worth it from my perspective. Plus the only system I would like is Kaleidescape and that is way too much money for me.
The studio now are trying to push ultra violet = Total crap. At least itunes you can download anywhere on Apple TV, Mac, iPod i Pad Iphone....

it's stupid the penalty for ripping a movie you bought and paid for is more than if you download and steal a movie online illegally.

Does that make sense?
post #67 of 491
Quote:
Originally Posted by aaronwt View Post

Didn't they say DVDs? Not BDs? biggrin.gif
It was a Copyright Office ruling so I take it that it applies across all media, unfortunately. It's a symbolic victory unless someone decides to take action and press some charges.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mfusick View Post

it's stupid the penalty for ripping a movie you bought and paid for is more than if you download and steal a movie online illegally.
Does that make sense?
5 years and $250,000 is the maximum penalty for illegal distribution. The thing is no one is going to know what you're doing within the confines of your own home, so you've probably done something pretty stupid if you got on FBI's radar in the first place. In other words, as long as you're not passing out copes at the local flea market...
post #68 of 491
Quote:
Originally Posted by halgameguru View Post

We need to get a lawyer on this, because if what we bought was a license to play the content on DVD players rather than the disc and what it contains that means they must now replace any damaged or defective discs in perpetuity. Forever...

That is precisely how I see it as well. If their position is you did not purchase a right to the physical product, but only a license to use that product, they have essentially made thier bad and have said that any disk you buy for which you can show proof of purchase, they are obligated forever to replace that disk for free should it become damaged because refusing to do so would prevent you from exercising your indefinite licensing rights. Sorry but you dont get to have your cake and eat it too. biggrin.gif:D
post #69 of 491
Quote:
Originally Posted by cctvtech View Post

"Internet users" does not equal computer owners.

The original poster who started this mularkey with his 1 percent comment crapola had no clue whether the other poster actually owns a PC or a Mac. He just ASSumed so. tongue.gif
post #70 of 491
If you're using PowerDVD 12 Ultra, you can stream the playback to any uPnP device directly from the drive. This way you're still following the letter of the law in that you are playing the disc, but you can use the movie on any screen you want without a direct cable connection.

It sucks, but until movie studios pull their heads out of their butts and start keeping up with the current technologies, then it is your only legal option for non-optical drive devices.

Edit: Meant to quote a question on the front page about a user with a laptop wtih BD and no other disc players in the house.
Edited by FZTali - 11/1/12 at 8:12pm
post #71 of 491
wow --- this is moving into a very gray area.

Case in point. I wanted to do P90x --- and I did. But I didn't want to bring my laptop to the gym every time I worked out. Instead I wanted to use my PSP with a video out attachment that links to the HDTV on the wall at the gym. Easier to carry - less risk of theft than dragging a laptop around.

I bought the P90X set on DVD legitimately. I ripped them all to the PSP using one of the freeware tools. I used the PSP at the gym with the videos instead of a laptop. I have since purchased a tablet and would do that same thing to the tablet instead of a PSP. That apparently is now illegal? I can't get the P90X content legally for PSP or tablet --- however I do own the DVDs and purchased the content for my consumption. Why should I not be able to chose how I consume the content I purchased?


Seems very gray and I don't think the courts should have favored on the side of the studios in this instance. There is a difference in making a backup copy or moving your purchased media to a format you wish to consume in personal use --- and that of pirating the media without purchasing it -- or selling pirated media. It seems they are outlawing the wrong thing and once again hurting actual legit customers by making rational things illegal.
post #72 of 491
Guess I wont bother buying any discs anymore. All the better for streaming services, and all the more reason not to go legal. That is my favorite part about DRM it makes it such a pain to go legal alot of people just don't bother.
post #73 of 491
This is all part of a push to turn the consumer from a person who owns things to a person who leases things. I like to own a movie. By owning a movie, I can sell my disc for some sort of financial gain. By leasing a movie, the only thing owned is your money by every copyright holder out there with nothing in exchange.
post #74 of 491
It is our legislators who are to blame the most. They passed the DMCA because the content owners bought them and paid them to. Remember who keeps extending copyright terms? The legislators. Why? they were paid. Copyright used to be 25 or 30yrs I believe, before they realized the Beatles catalog as an example would be free to all. Now copyright is more like 80 years, and royalties are passed onto estates and heirs. Why do you think Elvis' daughter doesn't have a job.
Legislators avoid responsibility by hiding in the herd. If a court ever rules on this "interpretation" they may have a narrow view of the encryption issue but it could go either way.
post #75 of 491
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Hampton View Post

It's always been illegal.
If you pay attention there is some information on those FBI warning screens to let you know that.
People want to say its legal,... That doesn't exactly work though.

the FBI screens that some software allows you to remove when ripping? lol
post #76 of 491
Quote:
Originally Posted by Flavius View Post

Real men do it anyway.

Warning: Real men go to prison or pay fines.
post #77 of 491
I guess this means that from now a lot of us are going to be in the criminal field.

I'm strongly against laws that pushes normally law abiding citizens into criminal behaviour. mad.gif

And, I guess I won't get a new disc from the distributors when my shiny disc refuses to play for some reason...
post #78 of 491
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoshTerk View Post

Ok, so can I now purchase digital copies of movies at a significant price reduction over the disk version? Now they don't have to manufacture, package, ship, distribute, and market the disks. Just let me download for about $2-5 and we'll call it even!

+1,000

But ONLY as long as the downloads are the SAME quality, bit for bit, as the disc medium I bought!
post #79 of 491
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mfusick View Post

it's stupid the penalty for ripping a movie you bought and paid for is more than if you download and steal a movie online illegally.
Does that make sense?

So if we're criminals for paying them and ripping to our hard drive now, why bother even paying them for the movie in the first place? Morally, I felt I needed to buy the movie and rip it. Now, I think the moral high ground they had is almost gone. If they can put me in jail for doing what I want with something I legally purchased in my own home, I don't see any reason to purchase in the first place.
post #80 of 491
Quote:
Originally Posted by NK215 View Post

If I buy a disk and got it scratched, would the company send me a replacement? Since I bought the right to play and the disk is no-longer playable

Disney will. You have to register the disc with them and pay shipping.
post #81 of 491
Can I duplicate my house key for personal use or will I be violating some rights?
post #82 of 491
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeBlow74 View Post

The law is the law. Deal with it. I am I am not playing devils advocate, but the law is the law. You have to make a decision when you all purchase a movie. Do I buy disk? Do I buy digital? If the big bad movie studio wants to prevent people from ripping movies, stop selling internal and external disk burners. If the major electronics company quits making blank disks and burners the whole issue would be solved.

lol. hilarious. I bet you dont take off the tags on your mattress either
post #83 of 491
Quote:
Originally Posted by Freniata View Post

Can I duplicate my house key for personal use or will I be violating some rights?

Its says do not duplicate, right their on the key.

KEY.jpg 7k .jpg file
post #84 of 491
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbailey75 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Freniata View Post

Can I duplicate my house key for personal use or will I be violating some rights?

Its says do not duplicate, right their on the key.

KEY.jpg 7k .jpg file

LOL... smile.gif
post #85 of 491
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daniel Chaves View Post

so does that mean Walmart is going to get sued and have to stop its DVD ripping service?
They tried to stop people from ripping before, then they changed their mind, now they are trying again but soon will go wow this is useless and go back to letting people... I know I wont stop...

When did Walmart get a DVD ripping service? I know they have a disc to digital service through VUDU, but this does not involve ripping any discs.
post #86 of 491
[SIZE] 4[/SIZE] The best everyone can do anymore and everyone has to do it is BOYCOTT.... It use to work great back in the days that was the only way these big companies woke up and did what the consumer wanted. Now days nobody gives a flying crap about anything they just complaine and comply and they all know it and get away with it all. The first thing to do is let all the actors, singers etc know you don't need to get paid that much to do a gig they already get royalites so why should anyone get paid $50 million to do a gig plus royalties? It's time that everyone look out for each other, not themselves, and stand up to these greddy people tell them enough is enough. If it ain't selling nobody is making money. We out number them billions to a few thousand and all I see is the few thousand winning and the billions whining.
post #87 of 491
Quote:
Originally Posted by rakuen.now View Post

Ripping a blu-ray as we speak. Oops.

Same here. Only have about 5TB of space left on my NAS, guess I'll stop when it's full...

lol Nah, just buy bigger HDD's for it.
post #88 of 491
Maybe it is already here, have not read all the posts but, if I can't back up my DVDs to a computer how is it legal for me to take my DVDs to Walmart and let them put them on the "cloud" for me at a price???
post #89 of 491
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeBlow74 View Post

The law is the law. Deal with it. I am I am not playing devils advocate, but the law is the law. You have to make a decision when you all purchase a movie. Do I buy disk? Do I buy digital? If the big bad movie studio wants to prevent people from ripping movies, stop selling internal and external disk burners. If the major electronics company quits making blank disks and burners the whole issue would be solved.

You must be a cop.

The Law is the Law: Womans Suffrage
The Law is the Law: Slavery
The Law is the Law: Segregation

Keep it up sport.
post #90 of 491
Honestly the MPAA has to much political influence for one the courts should not be allowed to tell us how we consume legally bought media. If anything they should not be allowed to limit our use with DRM. Also I think the whole license idea is just a way for them to do what's happening in the gaming industry right now. You buy the disk but you only buy part of whats on disk then you have to pay extra to unlock access to additional material that's already on the disk. So it really comes down to you bought a movie but you only licensed the theatrical cut with stereo audio to unlock the extended cut with 7.1 sound you have to buy the additional license for that. so as you can see from my example the whole licensing concept is really bad and can become very costly for the end user.
Edited by necroticart - 11/2/12 at 8:11pm
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