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Best Matching to Quality Receiver for Sonus Faber Speakers - Page 2

post #31 of 36
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NorCalJason View Post


Yes. Today's receivers have mics included and run an automated setup. Audyessy, ARC, Ypao, etc. They're all different methods of auto calibration.

Sweet ! And the ones included in the box, are they as good as ones you would go buy as a separate unit ? (you know how that is - usually, they give you cheesy quality stuff compared to whats available in the real world for separate purchase, etc..) Would you recommend just using what they give me ? Or buying one ?
post #32 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoelxD View Post

Sweet ! And the ones included in the box, are they as good as ones you would go buy as a separate unit ? (you know how that is - usually, they give you cheesy quality stuff compared to whats available in the real world for separate purchase, etc..) Would you recommend just using what they give me ? Or buying one ?

I have no clue.

I've had a few different setups in my HT. At one point, I had an Onkyo Receiver. It had a microphone (cheap) and an automated setup program. It was not a receiver with Audyessy, Arc, Ypao, or anything special. Just an auto setup. It's supposed to set distance, levels, and speaker size.

It did an okay job.

I was able to get better results with a real mic while playing test tones.

I do not know how accurate the latest generation of room correction is.
post #33 of 36
The ones in the box are dedicated to the AVR, not for stand-alone testing. You could get your own SPL meter to check levels if you wish. I would start by seeing how the AVR does before starting down the "I wanna' do my own measurements" rabbit hole.

If you really want to do your own measurements, you'll need a calibrated mic or SPL meter (range from ~$100 up; I paid ~$600 for my earthworks measurement mic, but that is not a hobbyist item, I used it for work) and SW (again, free like REW up to $100k analysis programs).

To start with just get the AVR and set it up. You might find yourself liking the music and movies enough to spare yourself the incessant need to measure and upgrade.
post #34 of 36
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonH50 View Post

The ones in the box are dedicated to the AVR, not for stand-alone testing. You could get your own SPL meter to check levels if you wish. I would start by seeing how the AVR does before starting down the "I wanna' do my own measurements" rabbit hole.

If you really want to do your own measurements, you'll need a calibrated mic or SPL meter (range from ~$100 up; I paid ~$600 for my earthworks measurement mic, but that is not a hobbyist item, I used it for work) and SW (again, free like REW up to $100k analysis programs).

To start with just get the AVR and set it up. You might find yourself liking the music and movies enough to spare yourself the incessant need to measure and upgrade.

Good point. Will do. Makes sense too, I of all people have a problem always starting down a rabbit hole with 5 cans of preopened worms ! biggrin.gif 2 weeks and 14 pizzas later (and no shower or leaving house during whole time) I slowly come to, and realize I've "obsessed" again and also wasted my time - Ha ! Thanks for saving me this time !

Funny you mentioned Earthworks. I have one of their Drum Mic Kits (DFK2). The absolute BEST mics for drums IMO (other than maybe a occasional switch up to a Tube mic on the Snare, Hat and/or Kick), but seriously, I now hardly ever even do that. Them Earthworks are no joke... (and so small !!)

Didn't even know they made testing mics. Interesting.
post #35 of 36
"2 weeks and 14 pizzas later (and no shower or leaving house during whole time)"

Too much information. Way too much... smile.gif

Sennheiser and B&K used to make good test mics but I've no idea where they stand now. Earthworks is one of the "go-to" test mics, as well as mics for many other applications, so a while back I picked up one. I have been lusting after their piano mic kit, but it is way out of my current budget, alas....

I have used all sorts of schemes over the years to mic drums. Not sure I ever found one good for all drums, or drummers... Still annoyed with the one who decided to spin his sticks and let fly, taking out a pair of SM-81's in the process.
post #36 of 36
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonH50 View Post

"2 weeks and 14 pizzas later (and no shower or leaving house during whole time)"

Too much information. Way too much... smile.gif
biggrin.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonH50 View Post

I have used all sorts of schemes over the years to mic drums. Not sure I ever found one good for all drums, or drummers... Still annoyed with the one who decided to spin his sticks and let fly, taking out a pair of SM-81's in the process.

This is true, very true. As with anything, I have had to slowly learn, unfortunately, there is no "holy grail" in anything. Ever.

Wow ! We have the same taste, before these EW mics, SM-57's and 81's were part of my go-to drum mic set up. Not the best sounding always, BUT always sounded good on any drummer/set I threw at them. The mics that sounded better on certain things, were exactly that, only sounded better on certain things and circumstances - hit and miss. SM-81's man, just always at least sounded good. And all SM's are affordable too, seriously the best bang for buck. I still own and still use them... just not as much lately due to me being super pumped on using my EW's.
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