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Official OPPO BDP-105 Owner's Thread - Page 87

post #2581 of 10074
Quote:
Originally Posted by darthkringle View Post

Guys- I take delivery on a BDP-105 and have read through the whole thread and don't see an answer on this one. If I want to use the Stereo DAC on the BDP -105, I know that I can apply bass management which is an advantage over other dedicated DAC's, but in my particular room, setting my mains as Large AND having the sub active for content below 80Hz does not appear to be an option correct? Basically in this scenario it replicates what many AV receiver have that offers doubling the bass below 80hz since it is being reproduced by both the mains and the subs. Can this be done in the Oppo's bass management?


Thanks guys!!

There's good news and bad news. The bad news first: The Asynchronous USB DAC input on the 105 goes STRAIGHT to the DACs, so no bass management is possible.

The good news is that if you play your stereo content by some OTHER means, such as off a hard drive connected to one of the regular USB ports, then you CAN get the bass doubling you want although that's not a configuration I would recommend. The need for bass doubling usually means you don't have your sub positioned properly, with correct Crossover and Phase selected.

Anyway the way you do it is to wire the Dedicated Stereo Analog outputs and also the Sub output from the multi-channel Analog set.

Set Stereo Signal DOWN MIX STEREO so the Dedicated L/R get the full frequency range of your stereo content. Meanwhile, in the multi-channel Analog speaker configuration, set Sub ON and LF/RF SMALL and set your desired 80Hz Crossover. Nothing is actually wired to the LF/RF outputs -- just the Sub output.

The Sub output will get bass steered to it below the Crossover which will then duplicate the bass already in the Dedicated L/R outputs.

The Sub output will need +15dB boost external to the player (e.g., raise the Sub's volume knob) to match the Dedicated RCA outputs (21dB boost to match the XLR outputs). Use a calibration disc to check levels.
--Bob
Edited by Bob Pariseau - 1/8/13 at 11:04am
post #2582 of 10074
Quote:
Originally Posted by darthkringle View Post

Guys- I take delivery on a BDP-105 and have read through the whole thread and don't see an answer on this one. If I want to use the Stereo DAC on the BDP -105, I know that I can apply bass management which is an advantage over other dedicated DAC's, but in my particular room, setting my mains as Large AND having the sub active for content below 80Hz does not appear to be an option correct? Basically in this scenario it replicates what many AV receiver have that offers doubling the bass below 80hz since it is being reproduced by both the mains and the subs. Can this be done in the Oppo's bass management?
Thanks guys!!

The simplest way to look at it is:

- The Oppo 105 multi-channel outputs do bass management on any speaker you set to small in the Oppo configuration; these outputs are for connecting to a Pre/Pro or amplifier's multi-channel inputs (that typically don't provide bass management). The Oppo bass management for the multi-channel outputs applies to any source played through them from 2.0 up to 7.1. So if you want bass management for stereo sources, use the multi-channel outputs.

- The Oppo Stereo Outputs are like any other stereo outputs on any player or stereo source - they send full-range stereo to your Pre/Pro or amplifier. If the Pre/Pro does bass management from there, that's what you get.

- The Oppo digital outputs don't do any bass management; they send the source streams (stereo or multichannel) to the Pre/Pro to sort out.

The only wrinkle that is different from most other players is that the higher quality Stereo DAC outputs can be substituted for the FL/FR multi-channel outputs. You lose the full-range down-mixed Stereo Output option when you do this.

And...no bass management at all with DSD-to-analog and no bass management with the Async USB to DAC connection.

If you want to double the level of bass below 80Hz, the easiest way is to turn up the sub woofer amp 3dB. That or, if your sub supports it, also connect the speaker level inputs to your amp FL/FR and set the sub crossover to 80Hz and dial up the level.

That AVR trick - Fronts set to LARGE and SUB set to LFE+MAIN that doubles up the bass is a really bad idea in almost any scenario.
post #2583 of 10074
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff Baker View Post

Sounds like the same issue I'm having with my Roku. I think it's funny that people will try to ascribe these problems to WiFi problems when the equipment works perfectly fine in the absence of the the Oppo, and then doesn't work when you insert the Oppo. Looks like there's some kind of problem that is causing multiple people to report periodic audio dropouts when using the digital inputs of the Oppo.

I use the digital inputs (COAX) continuously for Sonos and have no dropouts - not ever so far.
post #2584 of 10074
The OPPO UK web site now offers the "Official" 1220 firmware for the European model players (BDP-103EU and BDP-105EU):

http://www.oppo-bluray.co.uk/customer-services/bdp-103-105eu/

--Bob
post #2585 of 10074
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevepow View Post

I use the digital inputs (COAX) continuously for Sonos and have no dropouts - not ever so far.

It works fine with my Sonos ZP80, over either coax or optical.
post #2586 of 10074
Home Cinema Choice (Feb. 2013): New Review of the BDP-105EU by Richard Stevenson

http://www.oppo-bluray.co.uk/UserFiles/Docs/PDF/HCC_105EU_Reference.pdf


AWARDED: 5 Stars -- Home Cinema Choice Reference Status




HEADLINE: Big, brooding and bloomin' brilliant!

Quote:
I'd go so far as saying the BDP-105EU is the most significant evolution of the Blu-ray player since the format was developed.
Quote:
If there are BD players out there that deliver a better picture than this, I am yet to test them.
Quote:
Using the Oppo as a processor connected directly to a power amplifier is a revelation. The setup for speaker size and distance is straightforward and the result is a crisp, precise sound with breathtaking dynamics. Soundtracks soar out of the speakers, clean and polished with fabulous detailing. The noise-floor is ridiculously low, making swells from quiet to loud simply stunning.



--Bob
post #2587 of 10074
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Pariseau View Post

Film is recorded at 24 frames per second. TV is recorded at 30 frames per second (displayed as 60fps in modern displays). The process of raising the frame rate of film to TV frame rates is known as "telecine". Ignoring some details, it is a pretty straightforward process which you've been seeing all your life -- any time you watched a move on broadcast TV. But because 24 does not go evenly into 30 there's a problem. Some portions of the film imagery will have to be held on screen slightly longer than other portions to make it work.
The result is what is known as "cadence judder" -- a very slight "ratcheting" of motion which the brain is quite good at ignoring, which is why they can get away with it.
But suppose instead of using a TV that put up 60 images a second you could make a TV that put up 48 or 72 or 96 frames a second -- some multiple of 24? Well in that case you could display you movie WITHOUT cadence judder!
Many modern TVs are able to accept 1080p/24 input (1920x1080 video frames 24 times a second) and automatically switch to a "refresh rate" which is a multiple of 24. Some of those TVs even manage to do that without screwing up!
Movies on Blu-ray are recorded on disc at 1080p/24. The player has the ability to output those at 1080p/24 or at 1080p/60 (i.e, the player applies the telecine). During the HDMI handshake, the TV (or AVR -- whichever is next in the HDMI cabling chain) tells the player whether it is willing TO ACCEPT 1080p/24 input.
1080p/24 OFF means the player takes 1080p/24 content and produces 1080p/60 output.
1080p/24 AUTO means the player takes 1080p/24 content and produces 1080p/24 output if the next device says it can accept that, otherwise 1080p/60
1080p/24 ON means the player takes 1080p/24 content and produces 1080p/24 output EVEN IF the next devices says it CAN'T accept that! This is for certain displays which are known to be able to accept 1080p/24 but which fail to publish that fact properly during the HDMI handshake.
Note that not all Blu-ray discs have 1080p/24 content. MOVIE discs have that. But Blu-ray programs produced using TV cameras are recorded on disc as 1080i/60. Such discs are never output by the player as 1080p/24, even if you have 1080p/24 ON selected. (If using 1080p output resolution, they are output as 1080p/60.)
Which brings us to standard DVDs. SD-DVDs of movies are recorded at 480i/60. That means that telecine HAS ALREADY BEEN APPLIED as part of making the "transfer" of the movie to the disc.
DVD 24p Conversion will attempt to extract the original 24 frames per second of the movie and output that as 1080p/24.
Obviously if you know your TV can't take 1080p/24, or doesn't "do the right thing" with it, there's no point in attempting DVD 24p Conversion.
But in addition you need to know that many SD-DVDs will not convert cleanly. First off, if the SD-DVD is of a program (perhaps a TV show episode) that was originally recorded at /60, then there IS no /24 stream to recover. Indeed you can't force /60 down to /24 in any useful fashion because there's no safe way to choose which portions of the moving video to discard.
And there are also true movie discs where DVD 24p Conversion won't produce good results because of the way the disc was recorded. Either the method of producing the master for the disc, or the editing of the master have left the original /24 stream in such confusion that the player will not be able to extract it cleanly.
In either case you will get "frame drop stutter" which is an easily noticed jerkiness of motion -- most obvious in pans because so much of the image is moving on screen.
If you know your AVR or TV can accept 1080p/24, then you may very well want to leave 1080p/24 AUTO set. However DVD 24p Conversion should be used judiciously. Use it with newer discs of newer movies to maximize the chance of a well recorded transfer. But at the first sign of frame drop stutter, go turn DVD 24p Conversion OFF (you can get into Setup and do that even while the movie is playing) and leave it off for the balance of the film.
Color Space and Deep Color refer to two different characteristics of the video data format presented on the HDMI cable.
RGB Color Space presents a Red, Green, and Blue value for each pixel. YCbCr Color space presents a gray scale brightness or luminance (the Y value) and two "Color Differences" (the CbCr values) which tell how to color that otherwise black and white pixel. Cb and Cr tell how much to add or subtract the Blue or Red coloration respectively. If you remove all the Blue and all the Red from a black and white pixel what results is a Green pixel. So these 3 components give you all the information for a pixel just like the 3 RGB components.
Why you would want to use one of the other is complicated. As a starting point, YCbCr 4:4:4 is the "default" format for HDMI connections, and the content on disc is also recorded in YCbCr (with added complications that I'll blithely pass over).
Meanwhile Deep Color refers to how many bits are used to represent each of the 3 components. Deep Color OFF means 8 bits per component (24 bits per pixel). The other choices are 10 bits per component (30 bits per pixel), and 12 bits per component (36 bits per pixel).
The data on disc is always 8 bits per component -- even for Blu-ray. That means 30 and 36 bit output don't really have true content data in those extra bits. They contain either padding zeroes or the result of rounding in the intermediate video processing.
The real problem for someone getting into this is that there is no pat answer to the question, "Well heck! Which combo is best?"
That's because AVRs and Displays have quirks (read "bugs") in there video processing implementations and because Displays really aren't physically capable of rendering 12 bits per component such that all the combos are distinguishable.
So the reality is that you either have to trust the recommendation of someone who's already tried this stuff with YOUR AVR and Display or you have to try it yourself and see if you can find a reason to prefer one combo over another.
If you check for a post by me in the Official OPPO BDP-93 Owner's Thread discussing "Ratatouille", Blu-ray, you'll find one suggested way of checking for whether there's a reason to prefer any of these combos over another.
--Bob

Thanks, Bob! Finally, took the time to read your whole post and the one a couple below this. Truly an education for us.

Under "what else-rain-with 'heavy rain' promised" Seattle skies, Gill
post #2588 of 10074
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff Baker View Post

I don't think the bass management does anything at all to the dedicated 2-channel outputs (which I assume is what you'd want to be listening to in a DAC application).
it is true until you assign the source to the Dedicated Stereo Signal as "FL/FR" channels.
post #2589 of 10074
Many (most?) of the questions on this forum about LFE concern stereo, downmix, and small speakers.

I wanted to understand why even with multichannel, no downmix, and large speakers, the LFE channel is attenuated 10 dB, so I asked Bob, and he explained.

For the benefit of others who might be curious about this, here's our conversation:

Jim: The discussion about 15dB seems to be related to downmix. Can you clarify what happens with LFE when all speakers are set to large and the dedicated stereo outputs are used for L and F including in multichannel?

Bob: Any speaker channel that's asked to carry the contents of more than one content channel (due to down mix) has to be attenuated to provide headroom.

In addition, LFE content is *recorded* -10dB down to begin with.

When the Dedicated Stereo outputs are used with Stereo Signal FRONT LEFT/RIGHT -- so they can be used in place of the normal LF/RF outputs of the multi-channel set -- all the settings and rules that would normally apply to LF/RF apply to them as well. In addition there is the extra factor that the XLR outputs are +6dB hotter than the RCA outputs.

When the Sub is ON and all speakers are Large, then no bass steering (a type of down mix) is happening into the Sub and so its output is -10dB down compared to the multi-channel RCA outputs -- the result of the way LFE is recorded.

When the Sub is ON and any speakers are Small then the Sub output is -15dB down compared to the other RCA outputs. The extra -5dB is a form of down mix attenuation.

When the Sub is OFF and LF/RF are Large then LFE gets fed into LF/RF. As a result LF/RF have to be attenuated -- because they have to be matched in volume to LFE before the mixing can happen (-10dB) plus an additional amount of attenuation for headroom in the mix (because max LFE alone could max out the allowed voltage for the channel). But if you are playing multi-channel content and the other speaker channels are also being down mixed into LF/RF, then even more attenuation is required so that the the normal LF/RF content, the LFE content (which can max the channel despite being recorded -10dB down), and the down-mixed content from the other speakers can all add together and still fit into those Front channels without risk of clipping the input at the other end of the cable. How this happens is a bit complicated because rear sound stage content is reduced in volume prior to the down mix so that the sound stage stays properly positioned in the front of the room.

There are standard attenuation tables for how this is accomplished -- how much volume from each channel participates in the resulting mix, and how much the mix itself is reduced over all to allow headroom in case all the incoming audio components happen to be max volume simultaneously. But trying to detail all that is a chore.

I believe Dolby Labs may have some white papers on that if you are really interested.

Jim: This is the part I've never understood:

"When the Sub is ON and all speakers are Large then no bass steering (a type of down mix) is happening into the Sub and so its output is -10dB down compared to the multi-channel RCA outputs -- the result of the way LFE is recorded."

That's our configuration--all speakers large, two subs, Oppo configured so multichannel uses the dedicated stereo outputs. Why in that case is LFE reduced by 10 dB?

Bob: Ah! OK. you need to understand that there's a standard range of signal levels for "an audio channel" that's pretty much set in stone by the history of audio processing. You can't, for example, create an audio track with audio of 200dB in the Left Front or Right Front channel. Doing so, in addition to making your ears bleed and getting you sharp looks from the people next door, will clip your audio chain. It is not prepared to deal with a signal that large at all the steps through the audio processing that made the mix on the disc, and all the steps that happen during disc playback.

For most content this is not a problem. But for effects content people want loud. Admittedly it will only be loud for a short while (that next explosion), but they still want it chest thumpingly loud.

Well you can't put that in a normal audio channel because the voltage levels go too high -- that clipping again.

So instead a new channel is created just to carry that loud stuff, a channel which rejoices in the name of LFE.

So why doesn't LFE have this problem? Because LFE is supposed to be only for that loud stuff (below 120Hz and loud)! And so we can all agree that what's in the LFE channel is actually supposed to be played +10dB louder than the content values carried in the channel would imply. Or alternatively, LFE is recorded -10dB down from reality. It has an extra 10dB of headroom built into its definition.

That means you can fit an LFE channel through all the audio processing prior to making the disc and during playback of the disc without screwing up the design limits of the audio channels. Because we'e all agreed ahead of time that eventually that LFE channel is going to get treated to a +10dB boost to get it up to it's full, chest thumping glory.

OK, normally the LFE goes to a speaker purpose-built for that -- your subwoofer. One way or another, the LFE coming off the disc gets boosted the needed +10dB before that Sub plays it. If it hasn't happened ahead of time, the Sub's own volume knob does the trick.

Now if you have any speakers small, bass below the Crossover frequency from those speaker channels goes to the Sub as well. But no problem, because that bass is a pittance compared to what the Sub is already set to do with LFE. You just attenuate the steered bass by -10dB to match the LFE and mix them together and then the +10dB boost happens and all is right with the world. (The attenuation raises the noise floor for that content steered from the mains, but noise floor is essentially a non-issue at bass frequencies.)

Now consider the alternative. Suppose you want to send the LFE to the main speakers instead OF to a sub. Well you still have to volume match the LFE and the main speaker audio before they are mixed together. And there's the rub. Now you have to attenuate the entirety of the main speaker content to match the LFE level, because you still need to maintain that -10dB until you get past the pre-amp. And so now you've raised the noise floor for all of the frequency range of the mains, and that's not good.

Jim: "Now consider the alternative. Suppose you want to send the LFE to the main speakers instead OF to a sub. Well you still have to volume match the LFE and the main speaker audio before they are mixed together. And there's the rub. Now you have to attenuate the entirety of the main speaker content to match the LFE level, because you still need to maintain that -10dB until you get past the pre-amp. And so now you've raised the noise floor for all of the frequency range of the mains, and that's not good."

Got that. But our configuration is five full-range speakers, two subs, and we have no intention of sending LFE to the L and R full-range, only to the subs.

In our case, why would it attenuate bass at all?

Bob: There's no additional attenuation. The LFE is already -10dB down as recorded on the disc. That means a full voltage output signal on the LFE channel represents -- purely by convention -- a sound +10dB louder than would be the case for any other channel. Because that's how it was recorded on the disc.

That max voltage is the same as for all the other channels because of the history of how audio is processed. I.e., an LFE channel signal is supposed to be able to go through a pre-amp the same way any other speaker signal goes through, so it shares the same voltage characteristics. But the LFE channel is special because a given voltage actually represents -- by convention -- a sound +10dB louder than for any other channel.

And at some point that LFE signal has to actually get its +10dB boost, so as to reproduce the true, intended volume of the recorded bass effect.

Again that can't happen in the player because the player's outputs are "line level" outputs which have to live within the specs of what a pre-amp is designed to handle.

In your case, if you are sending that output direct to your Subs, then the Subs provide the needed boost (via increased volume setting in the Sub).
post #2590 of 10074
I hate to be a pain, but no matter what I do, I cannot get the network function to work. Very frustrating!

I get a user/password box whenever I try to get into the music folder. What user and password is it wanting? I have tried my computer name and password that I use to unlock windows 8, but it does not like this.

How do I get it to push a music file from Media Monkey? I have tried to get into Media Monkey and select a music file while being in the Network menu on the Oppo and no luck.

I was able to get the asynchrous USB input working and then my windows 7 laptop broke. I bought a laptop with windows 8 and I cannot wait to be able to download the USB driver. Hurry up Oppo!

I am an old school audiophile and it is so much easier to use the silver disks!
post #2591 of 10074
Quote:
Originally Posted by boyce89976 View Post

Sounds like you may have some buffering issues with the airplay connection. Have you tried to connect directly to the 105 via USB? Or, tried connecting to the AP Express via Ethernet cable? The latter should isolate your issue as buffering or not.

It is not a buffering issue, the setup works just fine with another D/A converter.

I've read that the new airport express optical out has some jitter issues, so perhaps the 105 is having some issues with it.
post #2592 of 10074
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deanhorn View Post

I hate to be a pain, but no matter what I do, I cannot get the network function to work. Very frustrating!
I get a user/password box whenever I try to get into the music folder. What user and password is it wanting? I have tried my computer name and password that I use to unlock windows 8, but it does not like this.

Dean,

Bypass those fields and just press enter. If you still can't get in, this means that you have a username and password set up on your Network file sharing.
post #2593 of 10074
Quote:
Originally Posted by bakerwi View Post

Well, I've had the BDP-105 for about a week and am fortunate enough to still have my BDP-95 (purchaser hasnt' picked it up yet). However, I am also breaking in a pair of Paradigm Signature S8 after a brief stint with a piar of B&W 802 Diamonds. So I need to get accustomed to the BDP-95 through the Paradigms. As previously stated the BDP-105 need only not be a step back and early impressions indicate it will not be.smile.gif
I know a previous poster stated he thought the BDP-105 was better than the BDP-95 and was basically ask to defend his preference.eek.gif I say audition the unit in your setup and let your ears decide.smile.gif

I own a pair of Paradigm S8's and also Oppo 95, and thinking about Oppo 105.

Also considering B&W 800's; since you have had Paradigms and B&W's; can you give me your impression of two speakers.

Thanks.
post #2594 of 10074
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deanhorn View Post

I hate to be a pain, but no matter what I do, I cannot get the network function to work. Very frustrating!
I get a user/password box whenever I try to get into the music folder. What user and password is it wanting? I have tried my computer name and password that I use to unlock windows 8, but it does not like this.
How do I get it to push a music file from Media Monkey? I have tried to get into Media Monkey and select a music file while being in the Network menu on the Oppo and no luck.
I was able to get the asynchrous USB input working and then my windows 7 laptop broke. I bought a laptop with windows 8 and I cannot wait to be able to download the USB driver. Hurry up Oppo!
I am an old school audiophile and it is so much easier to use the silver disks!

The 103 and I assume 105 are apparently not compatible with the newer SMB file system included with WIN 8. It was discussed in the 103 thread a couple of days ago.
post #2595 of 10074
Thanks for all the advices ! Just ordered it, looking to do some tests this weekend smile.gif

* I am reading all the posts about the bass management, real curious. Sounds like the is A LOT of details and controls into it.
post #2596 of 10074
SUMMARY OF 83 TO 105 SQ

I see many people are curious about the sound quality of the 105 compared to.... We have posted about this more extensively but in summary for 2-channel SQ:

1) The 83SE sounded better than the 83.

2) The 83SE was the equal of or better than our Cambridge Azur 840C depending on the recordings.

3) The 93 sounded much like the 83SE.

4) The 95 was clearly better than the 93.

5) The 105 sounds even better than the 95.

6) The 105 direct to amps has kept us spellbound all afternoon!

As always take these observations with the usual caveat that they were made in our stereo system using our ears and our musical preferences. You may prefer a different presentation.

Under “can’t wait for the heavy rain tonight!” Seattle skies, Gill
post #2597 of 10074
BDP-105’s REMOTE

Not much to say here except it is a great improvement over the 95’s. No longer do we have to lean over past the speaker. Just point toward the wall and click!

Under “snow in a couple of days?” Seattle skies, Gill
post #2598 of 10074
Well, after many hour (days) of ripping my CD collection to a couple of of 2TB eSata drives I continue to have audio drop out through the wireless network connection and USB from my HTPC. I ripped the CD's with dBpoweramp in lossless wave format. I then tried a few players and was even going to purchase JRiver Media Center 18 but after trial could not get away from the audio dropouts with bit perfect transfer to the HTPC. I have no problem with any media played directly in player. I really wanted my audio collection now stored on HDD to work. frown.gif I called OPPO and they said I may have to return it. I am going to try to fish some Cat5 cable though my ceiling to a new Ethernet switch and try the network connection that way. Any other idea's would be much appreciated.
post #2599 of 10074
I use a wired connection and so far Oppo's networking has been flawless. No skips or servers vanishing, etc. I have a three windows 7 PCs and a linux pc running XBMCubuntu.

I'm able to access files via Windows Media Streaming, Windows SMB, XBMC UPnP DLNA and Ubuntu Samba/SMB. I'm also running Logitech Media Server on the linux box and can see that on the Oppo.

Additionally using an App called Bubble UPNP I can control all the media streaming with my Android phone. The Bubble app is so tied in, that the volume control on my phone controls the volume on the Oppo. Additionally the Bubble app can handle playlists and enqueue selections, something the Oppo can't do on it's own.

To top it all off, the quality of the audio coming out straight into the power amps is spectacular. My system has never sounded better. smile.gifsmile.gifsmile.gif
post #2600 of 10074
Quote:
Originally Posted by RickS View Post

Well, after many hour (days) of ripping my CD collection to a couple of of 2TB eSata drives I continue to have audio drop out through the wireless network connection and USB from my HTPC. I ripped the CD's with dBpoweramp in lossless wave format. I then tried a few players and was even going to purchase JRiver Media Center 18 but after trial could not get away from the audio dropouts with bit perfect transfer to the HTPC. I have no problem with any media played directly in player. I really wanted my audio collection now stored on HDD to work. frown.gif I called OPPO and they said I may have to return it. I am going to try to fish some Cat5 cable though my ceiling to a new Ethernet switch and try the network connection that way. Any other idea's would be much appreciated.

Hard wiring is a necessary step in troubleshooting network issues, but you can run a temporary cable just to test. Cat5/6 can be up to 300' long and it's cheap.

that said, there may be a setting in your router that will help. If it has a UPnP setting be sure that's enabled. It needs to give priority to streaming traffic, is the point.
post #2601 of 10074
I have read through most of this thread and I am probably going to finally purchase my first oppo player. I have read about them for many years now since the 83 and 83se. I currently use an orginal panasonic dmp-bd30. I know I am living in the dark ages as it goes for blu ray players. I also am using the onkyo pr-sc885 as my pre/pro. I know I can use the oppo 105 and feed my b&k 200.7 amp directly. My question - has anyone discussed anywhere that you will no longer have any post processing, THX etc., and room setup eq. I realize most individuals will use the 105 for mostly the audio enhancements. Any thoughts around this would greatly be appreciated.
post #2602 of 10074
Quote:
Originally Posted by RyanFry View Post

I have read through most of this thread and I am probably going to finally purchase my first oppo player. I have read about them for many years now since the 83 and 83se. I currently use an orginal panasonic dmp-bd30. I know I am living in the dark ages as it goes for blu ray players. I also am using the onkyo pr-sc885 as my pre/pro. I know I can use the oppo 105 and feed my b&k 200.7 amp directly. My question - has anyone discussed anywhere that you will no longer have any post processing, THX etc., and room setup eq. I realize most individuals will use the 105 for mostly the audio enhancements. Any thoughts around this would greatly be appreciated.

Ha! We have a Panasonic DMP-BD55 - it is like the stone age compared to the Oppo....sooooo sloowwww! Load a disc and go do laundry, then come back and it might be ready to play. No matter how you connect it, it will be like stepping into the present. smile.gif I may have to get a 103 now so I can retire than BD-55. rolleyes.gif
post #2603 of 10074
Quote:
Originally Posted by RickS View Post

Well, after many hour (days) of ripping my CD collection to a couple of of 2TB eSata drives I continue to have audio drop out through the wireless network connection and USB from my HTPC. I ripped the CD's with dBpoweramp in lossless wave format. I then tried a few players and was even going to purchase JRiver Media Center 18 but after trial could not get away from the audio dropouts with bit perfect transfer to the HTPC. I have no problem with any media played directly in player. I really wanted my audio collection now stored on HDD to work. frown.gif I called OPPO and they said I may have to return it. I am going to try to fish some Cat5 cable though my ceiling to a new Ethernet switch and try the network connection that way. Any other idea's would be much appreciated.

You should use dBPoweramp to convert a small selection to FLAC and try those. The smaller files will probably transfer OK. The reason I say this is that I am also wireless for the moment and ALAC (lossless compressed) converted on-the-fly to FLAC by AssetPNP server will play fine for me. My large 5.1 FLAC files will nearly play - some will - but most drop out pretty terribly. Lossless FLAC is probably better for you than WAV anyway - much easier tag and artwork management which will be a never-ending nightmare with WAV (been there/done that).

I plan to pull some wire in a week or so, but for the time being I put my 5.1 DVDA rips on a small hard drive hanging off the Oppo's back USB port.
post #2604 of 10074
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deanhorn View Post

I hate to be a pain, but no matter what I do, I cannot get the network function to work. Very frustrating!
I get a user/password box whenever I try to get into the music folder. What user and password is it wanting? I have tried my computer name and password that I use to unlock windows 8, but it does not like this...!
Windows 8 has a new SMB 3.x that is currently incompatible with Oppo user authentication.
But there are ways to make the Windows 8 Media Player understand about mkv and flac so you can use it as DLNA server service mkv and flac.
http://www.hack7mc.com/2009/01/playing-flac-files-in-media-center.html
post #2605 of 10074
Quote:
Originally Posted by Deanhorn View Post

I hate to be a pain, but no matter what I do, I cannot get the network function to work. Very frustrating!
I get a user/password box whenever I try to get into the music folder. What user and password is it wanting? I have tried my computer name and password that I use to unlock windows 8, but it does not like this.
How do I get it to push a music file from Media Monkey? I have tried to get into Media Monkey and select a music file while being in the Network menu on the Oppo and no luck.
I was able to get the asynchrous USB input working and then my windows 7 laptop broke. I bought a laptop with windows 8 and I cannot wait to be able to download the USB driver. Hurry up Oppo!
I am an old school audiophile and it is so much easier to use the silver disks!

There are multiple issues here:

1) There is typically no "Music" folder shared by a Windows Computer. When I look at the list of "devices" the Oppo shows, I see my Computer listed as XPS15 (that's what I named it). If I click on it, I see Music, Videos, Photos folders. The problem is, those shared folders are nonsense - they don't exist and no matter what name and password I supply, I get errors - likely because the shares are bogus - I have no idea where the Oppo is getting this from. The SMB problems mentioned above must be causing it. I have a NAS SMB server that works fine.

Moreover, none of the shared folders I have created or those shared by Windows show up in the list....So DO NOT click on your_computer_name or the Music, Videos, Photos folders that show up under it - it's all fake.

OK, so what then....

2) The correct and easy way to share Music with Win7/Win8 (and I just tried this with both systems) is to (and this may all be setup by default for all I know - I don't remember doing it specifically):

- "Open Network and Sharing Center"
- "Change Advanced Sharing Settings" (should be near top left)
- "All Networks" section
- "Choose Media Streaming Options..."
- You will see a name for You Media Library - by default it is your username, for me "stevepow" - you may change this if you want to
- You will also see a box with a list of all devices on your network - if you do not see "OPPO BDP-105" in that list, then the Oppo and your PC may not be on the same network - it has to show up in that list or nothing will work. You may need to go back to the previous page and make sure Network Discovery is ON. Then come back to this list. The list may take a moment to populate - give it a few seconds....
- Check the box "Allowed" for the Oppo.
- Click NEXT
- Now you get to choose what is shared to other devices - at the least, you will want to share Music....maybe videos and pictures as well.
- Click NEXT
- You may see something about a HomeGroup Password or be asked to create one - do this and continue. This information though is not needed by the Oppo

Now that all of this is done. Go back to the Oppo and select the network. There should be a name in the list like this: XPS15:stevepow: (but it will be your_computer_name:username: - or the name of the Media Library if you changed it above). Select that and you should be able to browse and play your music files.

3) To use MediaMonkey as a DLNA Server, read this: http://www.mediamonkey.com/wiki/index.php/WebHelp:Setting_UPnP/DLNA_Media_Servers/4.0

4) Media Monkey cannot "play to" or push a file to the Oppo. But it can be a server like the Windows server you set up above and the Oppo should be able to browse the MediaMonkey Server and play the audio files.

Let me know if you have any questions - this should be really easy to set up.
Edited by stevepow - 1/9/13 at 12:13am
post #2606 of 10074
Quote:
Originally Posted by stevepow View Post

1) There is typically no "Music" folder shared by a Windows Computer. When I look at the list of "devices" the Oppo shows, I see my Computer listed as XPS15 (that's what I named it). If I click on it, I see Music, Videos, Photos folders. The problem is, those shared folders are nonsense - they don't exist and no matter what name and password I supply, I get errors - likely because the shares are bogus - I have no idea where the Oppo is getting this from. The SMB problems mentioned above must be causing it. I have a NAS SMB server that works fine.
Moreover, none of the shared folders I have created or those shared by Windows show up in the list....So DO NOT click on your_computer_name or the Music, Videos, Photos folders that show up under it - it's all fake.

yeah, they aren't real shares, but they are not really fake either. They behave like filters. So when you click on Music it will list files that are .mp3, .flac, .wav, etc. Movies will be .mpeg, .mkv, .avi. etc and photos jpg, jpeg, tif, etc. So they all operate on the same share(s).
post #2607 of 10074
Is anybody using the optical output of Apple TV to feed the BDP-105? Does it work?
post #2608 of 10074
Was wondering if any owner of the 105 has experienced issues like HDMI handshake,audio pop's or lip sync when using HDMI,or some audio problem's when using analogue?
I've been reading in forum's that a lot of 103 owner's are having these problem's.
post #2609 of 10074
My 95 and 105 both have intermittant HDCP handshake issues using their HDMI 1 outputs in my config (Oppo -> Radiance -> RS66). The Oppo's HDMI 2 out seems more stable. That output bypasses the Qdeo video processing.
post #2610 of 10074
Quote:
Originally Posted by henrich3 View Post

My 95 and 105 both have intermittant HDCP handshake issues using their HDMI 1 outputs in my config (Oppo -> Radiance -> RS66). The Oppo's HDMI 2 out seems more stable. That output bypasses the Qdeo video processing.
Can it be solved through a F/W update or changing the HDMI port?
Is oppo aware of it ?
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