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Official OPPO BDP-105 Owner's Thread - Page 232

post #6931 of 10056
Quote:
Originally Posted by gelly View Post

Correct. I meant to say SBT hooked into the oppo via coax. Oppo connected ( for music via analog into my AVR.. Thx.

Coax can't handle HD audio. Need HDMI for that.
post #6932 of 10056
Ended up going with the 105....too many nagging thoughts that i would regret not having bought it in the first place. In terms of source material i Have a mostly 192/320 kbps digital music collection with a few ripped cds. Will the Dac improve on those or should i invest in cds of my few favorites for higher quality source material. I have seen a lot of back and forth on what is a good minimum line to draw with lossy and lossless audio for space/quality.
post #6933 of 10056
So i was playing xbox today when i thought of this...with all the video processing the oppo can do and the input and dual outputs....i would love to see a software mod that allows the xbox scren to be pslit when playing 2player Modern warfare for example. How awesome would that be? Essentially being able to crop the single input into two screens for the split output.
post #6934 of 10056
So from the previous answers that I got, it sounds to me like I *would* be able to utilize the analog outputs on the 105, sending that to the Analog inputs on my Onkyo 809 for both the HTPC and Oppo player itself.

Guess the only other thing I should ask is, do you find this to be "worth" it for me? I mean I know it'll be an improvement, and I know most everyone here owns one of these so the answer will most likely be yes, I'm just trying to ensure that I will get a noticeable difference switching from HDMI audio out of the Onkyo to Analog audio out of the Oppo, to the Onkyo, and out my speakers.
post #6935 of 10056
Quote:
Originally Posted by mva5580 View Post

So from the previous answers that I got, it sounds to me like I *would* be able to utilize the analog outputs on the 105, sending that to the Analog inputs on my Onkyo 809 for both the HTPC and Oppo player itself.

Guess the only other thing I should ask is, do you find this to be "worth" it for me? I mean I know it'll be an improvement, and I know most everyone here owns one of these so the answer will most likely be yes, I'm just trying to ensure that I will get a noticeable difference switching from HDMI audio out of the Onkyo to Analog audio out of the Oppo, to the Onkyo, and out my speakers.
One thing you need to be absolutely sure of is that the signals from the Oppo into the analog inputs of the Onkyo do not utilize the Onkyo DACs. If the Onkyo allows any signal processing at all with that setup (setting speaker distances for example) then the Onkyo DACs are being used.
post #6936 of 10056
To All Canadians with 103's and 105's,

If you would like to see the CinemaNow app activated for your player please contact CinemaNow's support and request they get working on it for Oppo players in Canada. Their response to me after I pressured them was that they would be working on it but had no official date for release. A few more "squeaky wheels" like me and we may get some grease. Being that Oppo has smaller volume than some of the other Blu-ray player manufacturers it seems CinemaNow has put it on the back burner.
post #6937 of 10056
Quote:
Originally Posted by Process53 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by mva5580 View Post

So from the previous answers that I got, it sounds to me like I *would* be able to utilize the analog outputs on the 105, sending that to the Analog inputs on my Onkyo 809 for both the HTPC and Oppo player itself.

Guess the only other thing I should ask is, do you find this to be "worth" it for me? I mean I know it'll be an improvement, and I know most everyone here owns one of these so the answer will most likely be yes, I'm just trying to ensure that I will get a noticeable difference switching from HDMI audio out of the Onkyo to Analog audio out of the Oppo, to the Onkyo, and out my speakers.

One thing you need to be absolutely sure of is that the signals from the Oppo into the analog inputs of the Onkyo do not utilize the Onkyo DACs. If the Onkyo allows any signal processing at all with that setup (setting speaker distances for example) then the Onkyo DACs are being used.

Well I can set speaker distances in the Onkyo, but are you referring to those sorts of options changing/disabling when I'm running the analogs from Oppo to Onkyo? Would the Onkyo manual answer this for me?
post #6938 of 10056
Quote:
Originally Posted by Process53 View Post

One thing you need to be absolutely sure of is that the signals from the Oppo into the analog inputs of the Onkyo do not utilize the Onkyo DACs. If the Onkyo allows any signal processing at all with that setup (setting speaker distances for example) then the Onkyo DACs are being used.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mva5580 View Post

Well I can set speaker distances in the Onkyo, but are you referring to those sorts of options changing/disabling when I'm running the analogs from Oppo to Onkyo? Would the Onkyo manual answer this for me?

My worries for you will be that you cannot hear any discernible sonic differences to your liking between running analog or digital out the 105 to your Onkyo. The Onkyo is still in your audio path, and will have an effect to your overall, final audio signal running to your power amp. It's really a crapshoot, with all the processing(analog and dacs) your receiver adds to your overall signal path. If you're feeding an analog signal into your Onkyo, the only way your Onkyo's dacs would come into play is if that analog signal were to be first converted back to a digital signal (by an analog to digital converter), then back to analog again by a dac....a nightmarish scenario for sure. I don't even know if that is a possibility. That certainly wouldn't be a desirable outcome. The analog signal coming out of the 105 should be as unadulterated as possible before going into your power amp stage.
post #6939 of 10056
Quote:
Originally Posted by mva5580 View Post

Well I can set speaker distances in the Onkyo, but are you referring to those sorts of options changing/disabling when I'm running the analogs from Oppo to Onkyo? Would the Onkyo manual answer this for me?
I'm not sure what the actual scenario might be but my point is that you do not want the Onkyo to be converting the analog input back to digital and then back to analog out. Because if it is then you will lose the advantage of the Oppo DACs. DanF8500's post above highlights the same issue I am talking about. It may be possible to "pass-through" the analog signal through the Onkyo without using the Onkyo DACs. In this scenario maybe only Volume, Tone, and Balance are active. That's a lot of maybe's. You definitely need to know what is going on inside the Onkyo before buying the Oppo 105. You may want to contact Onkyo Support for the answer.
post #6940 of 10056
Quote:
Originally Posted by Process53 View Post

I'm not sure what the actual scenario might be but my point is that you do not want the Onkyo to be converting the analog input back to digital and then back to analog out. Because if it is then you will lose the advantage of the Oppo DACs. DanF8500's post above highlights the same issue I am talking about. It may be possible to "pass-through" the analog signal through the Onkyo without using the Onkyo DACs. In this scenario maybe only Volume, Tone, and Balance are active. That's a lot of maybe's. You definitely need to know what is going on inside the Onkyo before buying the Oppo 105. You may want to contact Onkyo Support for the answer.

A quick glance at the Onkyo manual suggests that perhaps "Direct" mode is what I'm looking for? The manual states (these are just the ones I found, at least) that the following settings are disabled in Direct mode:

- Bass/Treble settings
- Dolby Volume
- Audyssey
- Dynamic EQ
- Dynamic Volume
post #6941 of 10056
Quote:
Originally Posted by mva5580 View Post

A quick glance at the Onkyo manual suggests that perhaps "Direct" mode is what I'm looking for? The manual states (these are just the ones I found, at least) that the following settings are disabled in Direct mode:

- Bass/Treble settings
- Dolby Volume
- Audyssey
- Dynamic EQ
- Dynamic Volume

That doesn't mean you avoid the process of A-D-A conversion. Many AVRs simply eliminate extra processing, and all stereo analog inputs still get digitized. Consult the appropriate forum for that AVR to get answers. Usually you expect to see it labeled "analog direct" or the like if it's eliminating A-D-A conversions.
post #6942 of 10056
Quote:
Originally Posted by mva5580 View Post

A quick glance at the Onkyo manual suggests that perhaps "Direct" mode is what I'm looking for? The manual states (these are just the ones I found, at least) that the following settings are disabled in Direct mode:

- Bass/Treble settings
- Dolby Volume
- Audyssey
- Dynamic EQ
- Dynamic Volume
That looks promising. If it were me I'd still want some authority (the manual or Onkyo Support) saying that the DACs are not in use. The other thing is with all that disabled what controls do you have left to control the signal the way you want (like Volume for instance)?
post #6943 of 10056
Quote:
Originally Posted by anteroth View Post

Ended up going with the 105....too many nagging thoughts that i would regret not having bought it in the first place. In terms of source material i Have a mostly 192/320 kbps digital music collection with a few ripped cds. Will the Dac improve on those or should i invest in cds of my few favorites for higher quality source material. I have seen a lot of back and forth on what is a good minimum line to draw with lossy and lossless audio for space/quality.

To me it seems to be strange to be feeding a high quality DAC with compressed, lossy files. I would expect CD quality files on a moderate or even lower end DAC or player to sound better than MP3's through the best DAC.

Hard drives are cheap and getting cheaper, and a typical album would have ~500MB in full uncompressed WAV or AIFF form, so you can get ~2,000 albums per 1TB. I have recently got an inexpensive NAS and put in 2, 2TB drives. I run the NAS in RAID1, so one drive will automatically mirror the other, so I would not lose my rips if one of the drives crashes (you should still perform backups to protect against accidentally erasing files). This cost me ~$300. I hook this into my houses network using Ethernet to computers, OPPO 103, Onkyo AVR, and Marantz NA7004.

I have just ripped my ~1,000 CD library into uncompressed WAV files, which only uses about 25% of my 2TB drive. I ripped into WAV because all my devices can decode these files without any problems. Also, a Absolute Sound series on computer audio from last year came to the conclusion that uncompressed files (WAV or AIFF) sound a little better than lossless compressed files (FLAC or ALAC). This conclusion will cause a little controversy with the "bits is bits" and "it is just like a Zip file" arguments. I have NOT done any conclusive listening tests to draw my own conclusion, but with my "cheap hard drive" argument and the my reasoning that it would be impossible that uncompressed files to sound a worse than lossless compressed files, I thought the safe choice would be to rip uncompressed.

Also, I believe iTunes does NOT work w/ FLAC, and I have heard of instances in which WAV files will play gapless, but FLAC's will not. If there is any SQ differences in WAV vs. FLAC, I would think the difference to be caused by something analogous to "jitter", and be due to the realtime computing requirements of converting the FLAC's to PCM. I have noticed my NA7004 sounded better when fed uncompressed WAV files via Ethernet instead of digital input from the disc transport, with the difference being more of the relaxing and focusing more on the music and not the "sound", even though both have identical "bits".

If I were to do it again (since I have plenty of excess hard drive space), I would rip in AIFF (equivalent of WAV with imbedded metadata) to serve as my source files, and use S/W such as JRiver or dBPoweramp to convert to a duplicate directory for WAV's to feed my downstream equipment. That would give me the most future "flexibility", and possibly save many hours of reripping if I were to change music management S/W (I am currently demoing JRiver).
post #6944 of 10056
Quote:
Originally Posted by SilverLitz View Post

To me it seems to be strange to be feeding a high quality DAC with compressed, lossy files. I would expect CD quality files on a moderate or even lower end DAC or player to sound better than MP3's through the best DAC.

I have just ripped my ~1,000 CD library into uncompressed WAV files, which only uses about 25% of my 2TB drive. I ripped into WAV because all my devices can decode these files without any problems. Also, a Absolute Sound series on computer audio from last year came to the conclusion that uncompressed files (WAV or AIFF) sound a little better than lossless compressed files (FLAC or ALAC). This conclusion will cause a little controversy with the "bits is bits" and "it is just like a Zip file" arguments. I have NOT done any conclusive listening tests to draw my own conclusion, but with my "cheap hard drive" argument and the my reasoning that it would be impossible that uncompressed files to sound a worse than lossless compressed files, I thought the safe choice would be to rip uncompressed.

If I were to do it again (since I have plenty of excess hard drive space), I would rip in AIFF (equivalent of WAV with imbedded metadata) to serve as my source files, and use S/W such as JRiver or dBPoweramp to convert to a duplicate directory for WAV's to feed my downstream equipment. That would give me the most future "flexibility", and possibly save many hours of reripping if I were to change music management S/W (I am currently demoing JRiver).

I am also demoing Jriver and while there is definetely a learning curve it seems to be chock full of better features. Seems to be easier to change file data(artist album etc) in batches. Unfortunately i am of the younger generation and downloaded media is a large portion of my collection. I am familiar with HDTracks and intend to get a few of my favorite albums off of there but otherwise I have a mix of FLAC files and 320kbps, 16bit /44 Mp3s. Hard Drive Space is not an issue. Just harder to find the flac versions of my favorite albums. Also looking for a new receiver, I have the pioneer sc-55 and both the 57, and 68 models have 7.1 inputs so id better be able to utilize the oppo's saber dac.
post #6945 of 10056
Quote:
Originally Posted by mva5580 View Post

So from the previous answers that I got, it sounds to me like I *would* be able to utilize the analog outputs on the 105, sending that to the Analog inputs on my Onkyo 809 for both the HTPC and Oppo player itself.

Guess the only other thing I should ask is, do you find this to be "worth" it for me? I mean I know it'll be an improvement, and I know most everyone here owns one of these so the answer will most likely be yes, I'm just trying to ensure that I will get a noticeable difference switching from HDMI audio out of the Onkyo to Analog audio out of the Oppo, to the Onkyo, and out my speakers.

You should go with the 103 and upgrade your Onkyo processor/receiver and/or speakers if you are not satisfied with the sound. The 105 is designed for audiophile purists. Because you are unsure if using the DACs and analog section of the 105 is worth it, you are not (yet) an audiophile purist. And this is OK. In fact, it is better than OK because almost every AV product on the market will be designed to easily integrate into your processor centric system.

Contrast that with fully utilizing the 105. To do so, you'll need to re-architect your system and live with/work-around the limited number of digital inputs and no analog inputs. I have done this and have no hesitancy recommending the 105 to a fellow audiophile. But the 105 is not a mass market product and many will find it lacking as the central control point of their AV system.

Styln
post #6946 of 10056
Reading the specs of this receiver, might this be a better option for me? It looks as if the dac in this receiver is similar to the one in the 105.

http://www.amazon.com/Yamaha-RX-A3030-9-2-Channel-Aventage-Receiver/dp/B00D1VX38G/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1377466831&sr=8-1&keywords=Rx-3030
post #6947 of 10056
Quote:
Originally Posted by Styln View Post

You should go with the 103 and upgrade your Onkyo processor/receiver and/or speakers if you are not satisfied with the sound. The 105 is designed for audiophile purists. Because you are unsure if using the DACs and analog section of the 105 is worth it, you are not (yet) an audiophile purist. And this is OK. In fact, it is better than OK because almost every AV product on the market will be designed to easily integrate into your processor centric system.

Contrast that with fully utilizing the 105. To do so, you'll need to re-architect your system and live with/work-around the limited number of digital inputs and no analog inputs. I have done this and have no hesitancy recommending the 105 to a fellow audiophile. But the 105 is not a mass market product and many will find it lacking as the central control point of their AV system.

Styln
Those are great comments. You touch on a core philosophy: all the pieces of your system need to make sense in terms of complementing one another. Just because a piece is getting rave reviews (like the 105) does not necessarily mean it is the right piece for a person to buy. It has happened to me where I have been caught up in whatever the latest and greatest audio component happens to be. Euphoria can be a deceiving thing. And very costly if the wrong purchase is made. It is tricky finding the right solution. Buying audio equipment no different than any other process that a person engages in. Rewards are generally proportional to effort.
post #6948 of 10056
Hello guys,as the thread says,has anyone tried to play music by connect an usb from NAS to oppo usb dac? I have a large library on my computer (FLAC files) which the HDD's are full now and im trying to find out if is possible to play music in that way,i know NAS is acting like a litle computer on its own, and it needs own software media player to play the music filles to oppo usb dac but i was thinking of play those files with windows media player from my computer (like i do now) through NAS. Is it possible?

Thanks

Regards Meffy
post #6949 of 10056
Should work
post #6950 of 10056
Quote:
Originally Posted by Meffy View Post

Hello guys,as the thread says,has anyone tried to play music by connect an usb from NAS to oppo usb dac? I have a large library on my computer (FLAC files) which the HDD's are full now and im trying to find out if is possible to play music in that way,i know NAS is acting like a litle computer on its own, and it needs own software media player to play the music filles to oppo usb dac but i was thinking of play those files with windows media player from my computer (like i do now) through NAS. Is it possible?

Thanks

Regards Meffy
You're thinking about using a NAS all wrong. The beauty of a NAS is that you need just one cable to communicate with all components (other pc's, tv's, media players, etc.) on your home network.....IT'S ATTACHED TO YOUR HOME NETWORK via an ethernet cable. That's why its called Network Attached Storage. Your usb connector on the NAS is typically for connecting a printer, but now most printers these days can be connected directly to your router for network printing. Your computer will see your NAS as a mounted drive. Your Oppo will see your NAS via the SMB/CIFS protocol. You can now stream all your music files on your NAS via a network interface, utilizing either Oppo's networking interface sw or using any of the popular dlna media center/server software on the market.
Edited by DanF8500 - 8/26/13 at 7:31am
post #6951 of 10056
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanF8500 View Post

You're thinking about using a NAS all wrong. The beauty of a NAS is that you need just one cable to communicate with all components (other pc's, tv's, media players, etc.) on your home network.....IT'S ATTACHED TO YOUR HOME NETWORK via an ethernet cable. That's why its called Network Attached Storage. Your usb connector on the NAS is typically for connecting a printer, but now most printers these days can be connected directly to your router for network printing. Your computer will see your NAS as a mounted drive. Your Oppo will see your NAS via the SMB/CIFS protocol. You can now stream all your music files on your NAS via a network interface, utilizing either Oppo's networking interface sw or using any of the popular dlna media center/server software on the market.


Thanks DanF8500 for your reply, if i understand correct i can keep the usb cable attached to oppo usb dac(i want to take the advantage of the usb dac) from my pc and then play the songs that are storaged on NAS with windows media player (the software that i play my music from) from my computer?since my pc sees the NAS as a mounted drive? If the case is so,how do i copy/transfer my music library and films from my PC to the NAS,via ethernet cable? Or can i attach the NAS to my computer with eSATA/USB cable and transfer/copy everything i want to to it from my PC?

Thanks in advance

Regards Meffy
Edited by Meffy - 8/26/13 at 10:51am
post #6952 of 10056
^ Yes, Meffy. All I/O (input/output) operations involving your NAS will be via ethernet. Once your pc sees your NAS as a mounted drive, simple Windows file operations (drag/drop/move/cut/paste, copy, etc) will be used. Very simple. Once you get that up and running, you really won't need to use Oppo's usb dac interface. Like I mentioned above, it will be all network streaming of your music. If you start collecting dsd audio files, you won't be able to play them via the usb dac interface anyways.
post #6953 of 10056
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanF8500 View Post

^ Yes, Meffy. All I/O (input/output) operations involving your NAS will be via ethernet. Once your pc sees your NAS as a mounted drive, simple Windows file operations (drag/drop/move/cut/paste, copy, etc) will be used. Very simple. Once you get that up and running, you really won't need to use Oppo's usb dac interface. Like I mentioned above, it will be all network streaming of your music. If you start collecting dsd audio files, you won't be able to play them via the usb dac interface anyways.


Thank you very much DanF8500, i got it now. Talking about " (drag/drop/move/cut/paste, copy, etc) " how is the speed for file transfer via ethernet (wired in my case)? Is it as fast as it would be when you transfer files via eSATA or USB cable from your pc if the NAS would be connected to it?


Thanks.
Regards Meffy

PS. I really like the sound quality via USB DAC.It is simply amaizing wink.gif
post #6954 of 10056
^Speed is dependent on your hardware, both for networking and for serial interfaces. Just make sure to use a wired ethernet connection from your 105 to your router for best performance.....Cat5e or Cat6 cable is fine for your home network.
post #6955 of 10056
I've had the 105 for a little over one week now coming over from a BDP 83 which I was very happy with. I was surprised to see that the unit had vents on top of it. Has anyone bothered to get a 3rd party exhaust fan to keep dust out? Sorry if this has already been brought up but the search thread function isn't working for me.

Thanks
post #6956 of 10056
Quote:
Originally Posted by steady teddy View Post

I've had the 105 for a little over one week now coming over from a BDP 83 which I was very happy with. I was surprised to see that the unit had vents on top of it. Has anyone bothered to get a 3rd party exhaust fan to keep dust out? Sorry if this has already been brought up but the search thread function isn't working for me.

Thanks
I believe the vents on top of the 105 were needed due to its fan-less design, unlike the earlier oppo models which had a built in fan. I've owned many pieces of audio equipment over the years. I've never been worried about dust collecting inside of a piece of equipment. Here's an excerpt from the 103 faq:

Both the BDP-103 and BDP-105 are fanless.

This is a change in the BDP-105 as compared to the earlier BDP-95. OPPO says:

When we designed the BDP-105, we made it our goal to use passive cooling only. This was accomplished in two ways:

reducing heat generation
improving heat dissipation
The new dual-core SoC produces less heat than the previous decoder chip thanks to its advanced semiconductor fabrication process.

We added a separated winding to the new Toroidal transformer so we can get +5V and +3.3V power for the analog section from low voltage drop regulators instead of from the +15V rail.

The BDP-105 chassis is taller so it has more volume for air space and is slower to heat up. The ventilation grilles on the top, bottom and back of the player complete the passive cooling design by allowing cool air to come in and warm air to escape.
post #6957 of 10056
A fan would have been a drawback. Dedicated listening to high-res music is a passion for me - please "no fans required".
post #6958 of 10056
^^ Thanks for the info
Edited by steady teddy - 8/26/13 at 4:35pm
post #6959 of 10056
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanF8500 View Post

^Speed is dependent on your hardware, both for networking and for serial interfaces. Just make sure to use a wired ethernet connection from your 105 to your router for best performance.....Cat5e or Cat6 cable is fine for your home network.


Thank you very much sir for all your help, you really saved my day smile.gif. And now im goin to enjoy my OPPO and my new NAS server Synology DiskStation DS412+tongue.gif
Edited by Meffy - 8/26/13 at 4:51pm
post #6960 of 10056
^ You're welcome, Meffy. We're all on here to help each other. Enjoy your NAS. I have a Synology also.
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