or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › HDTV › HDTV Programming › The Creeping of Bleeping
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The Creeping of Bleeping - Page 5

post #121 of 164
Thread Starter 
Now even Beyoncé is swearing and getting bleeped on television. If you are not bleeping, you are not being seen or heard.....or getting laughs. If you are not bleeping, you are not trying. The key to success in modern TV is bleeping. Remember those good old days of 2006 when a bleep on prime TV was as rare as a Northern Hairy-nosed Wombat?
post #122 of 164
Thread Starter 
And now.........AN ENCORE.....we have a 88-year old granny getting massive air play for her one liner......"I could dance all f---- day." Of course, it's bleeped. I rest my case.
post #123 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by igreg View Post

Now even Beyoncé is swearing and getting bleeped on television. If you are not bleeping, you are not being seen or heard.....or getting laughs. If you are not bleeping, you are not trying. The key to success in modern TV is bleeping. Remember those good old days of 2006 when a bleep on prime TV was as rare as a Northern Hairy-nosed Wombat?
Even BEYONCE?????? Oh dear god it's the apocalypse.
post #124 of 164
Thread Starter 
For more evidence of the cultural shift toward the use of bleeping, check out the last thirty seconds of this early 2000's E! Special called "Halle Berry Revealed." You will see and hear three instances of profanity.....but the swear words are EDITED out....not BLEEPED out. Can ANYONE here disagree with the fact that these swear words would be bleeped out today? Why the change? Who was responsible for the shift from editing out swear words to bleeping them out? Nobody as of yet has an answer to that question.

And it is not that some programs edit and some bleep; they ALL bleep with the exception of live programming. And even then, if the live programming is replayed, even thought the profanity was edited out, the damn producers replaying the live event will not just replay the original edited version, but will insert a bleep where no swear word existed in the original! This editing technique must now be taught in school? How can it be so consistenly applied?

Here is the link; remember the last thirty seconds:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KGQmqSFVYz8
post #125 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by igreg View Post

You will see and hear three instances of profanity.....but the swear words are EDITED out....not BLEEPED out. Can ANYONE here disagree with the fact that these swear words would be bleeped out today? Why the change?
It would have sounded better with the beeps. The jarring silence makes me think there's something wrong with the audio. The bleep is the universal signal for "somebody said a bad word and we can't air it."
post #126 of 164
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeremy W View Post

It would have sounded better with the beeps. The jarring silence makes me think there's something wrong with the audio. The bleep is the universal signal for "somebody said a bad word and we can't air it."

Bleeping is jarring; not silence. If editing out swear words was the norm, your brain would be trained to know that the reason for the silence. Watch 99+ percent of video where swear words are edited out, and you know the reason. You can even figure out the word. Given that you have to go back at least 10 years before the onslaught of bleeping began. But bleeping is now used for much more than covering up swear words; writers and producers actually seek out opportunities to use the bleep in scripts, in the selection of interviews, and they are encouraged on talk shows. An extremely dramatic shift from the 90's when bleeps were seldom heard. And did bleeps even exists prior to the 90's. I still want to know how this occurred. For example, we can trace modern music to Elvis and The Beatles. Who pushed the bleep censor into its ubiquitous state? Anyone know? Heck, I have old episodes of Jerry Springer with no bleeps!
post #127 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by igreg View Post

Heck, I have old episodes of Jerry Springer with no bleeps!
Just curious, but why?
post #128 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by squeakybirnbaum View Post


Just curious, but why?

 

I think you might be asking for too much if you're trying to make any sense of this thread. wink.gif

post #129 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rammitinski View Post

I think you might be asking for too much if you're trying to make any sense of this thread. 
wink.gif
LOL, very good point. I was also going to ask why he was watching an early 2000's E! Special called "Halle Berry Revealed" but I don't think I'll bother.
post #130 of 164
Thread Starter 
Have you heard of YouTube? Try it some time. You will find archived material back to the 50's, let alone the early 2000's. What you will not hear is bleeps from more than 15 years ago. It's a continuum that is accelerating; yet, nobody in this forum can point to either its origination or the reason for its unanimous use today in place of swear words.
post #131 of 164
Thread Starter 
There are many people who are irritated by the sounds of the bleep, especially the freaking producers who try and make them as high-pitch and extended in length as possible. I have cited articles prior with authors with these same sentiments, and I can cite forums with many others not happy with this cultural shift.
post #132 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by igreg View Post

Bleeping is jarring; not silence.
For you. I'm telling you that for me, it's the other way around. I'm going to start writing letters of support to the most notorious bleepers, using this thread as a guide.
post #133 of 164
Thread Starter 
I am expanding this a bit.. I don't like bleeps because of their loud high-pitched shrill nature. I developed tinnitus for an extended period after being exposed to a home alarm. Latest trend in commercials? High-pitch smoke alarms....all over the place. FedEx just put one on the air.


In addition, marketing loves to have high-pitch EKG in the foreground, and, of course, microphones must have feedback. You can book the preceding every year. 100%. Anybody on this forum in marketing? Please change your freaking strategy. Nobody wants to hear fingernails on a chalkboard.
post #134 of 164
So if the sound used for the bleep were less cacaphonous, you wouldn't object to it?  Your issue is with the specific noise used to substitute for a profanity?  You weren't insisting on a silent audio dropout instead?

Either I missed something, or until now you hadn't made that clear.  The only thing I was sure of was that you weren't advocating letting the expletives rip, because you were praising the old practice (without specifying what about the old practice you preferred).
post #135 of 164
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dattier View Post

So if the sound used for the bleep were less cacaphonous, you wouldn't object to it?  Your issue is with the specific noise used to substitute for a profanity?  You weren't insisting on a silent audio dropout instead?

Either I missed something, or until now you hadn't made that clear.  The only thing I was sure of was that you weren't advocating letting the expletives rip, because you were praising the old practice (without specifying what about the old practice you preferred).

Correct. No good reason exists why producers cannot make the bleep less obtrusive, less high-pitched, less jarring, Studies have shown that people generally do not like loud, high-pitch noises. That is one reason that cell phone manufactures offer less jarring rings, and most people use them. Every month that passes, the frequency of bleeps increase. Can you watch an episode of Showbiz Tonight or Inside Edition, or ET, or more than an hour or two of CNN, or any of the late night television shows without hearing a bleep? No.

And now the bleeps, for the first time, are becoming common on primetime television.

As I have stated before, I can hear a bleep from a far bedroom when I didn't even realize the television was on, and if I fall asleep while watching television, a bleep will wake me up. If people can complain about loud commercial or clutter on their HD screen, I think it is reasonable for me to have a point of view on this subject. HLH: Warning about language.......then repeated bleeps, even as cursory intros to programming. It's so offensive that we are going to make sure we repeat it for you over and over and over again.
Edited by igreg - 5/14/13 at 11:11pm
post #136 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by igreg View Post

Studies have shown that people generally do not like loud, high-pitch noises.
What's funny is that the low-pitched intermittent buzz of a telephone busy signal was supposedly chosen because it was disliked and unpleasant and would get people's negative attention.
post #137 of 164
As a UK dweller, I have found really very few instances over here where the bleep button has been used recently.

A lot of the music video channels that are on FreeSat just remove the offending word and leave the background track playing (although often only the very central part of the word in question, so you can still easily guess the word itself).

With regards to television content, we have the 9pm watershed, before which the unwritten (and probably written) rule is you shouldn't swear. After 9pm you can pretty much say what you want, as long as it's not OTT or at 9.01pm! A lot of late night, often satirical comedy has been dropping in a certain 'final taboo' word here and there when it has suitable comic effect, which I assume is a very rare event in the USA... lol
post #138 of 164
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by MemX View Post

As a UK dweller, I have found really very few instances over here where the bleep button has been used recently.

A lot of the music video channels that are on FreeSat just remove the offending word and leave the background track playing (although often only the very central part of the word in question, so you can still easily guess the word itself).

With regards to television content, we have the 9pm watershed, before which the unwritten (and probably written) rule is you shouldn't swear. After 9pm you can pretty much say what you want, as long as it's not OTT or at 9.01pm! A lot of late night, often satirical comedy has been dropping in a certain 'final taboo' word here and there when it has suitable comic effect, which I assume is a very rare event in the USA... lol

Sounds like a great culture. I know in the UK the producers of commercials are forbidden from using bleeps. Not common in commercials here except for promos where they are used all the time. However, for the first time (another creeping of bleeping) two corporations are using bleeps in their commercials: Jack-in-The Box and a nameless corporation that sells combat videos for PS3.

What makes it even more infuriating is that the cable stations here do self censorship! No requirement for them to bleep out words, but they do. Heck, they even bleep words that can be said on over-the-air television.

As I am writing this, my television just bleeped. Literally hundreds of times a day now, probably thousands if you include every channel. And they all use the same high-pitch irritating sound, although some are more high-pitched and prolong (the worst I have ever heard is the Jeff Probst Show). There must be policies and procedures in how to do a bleep. Only exception is Craig Ferguson, who uses barn animal sounds - sometimes. His rabbit bleeps dozens of time when it appears.
post #139 of 164
Thread Starter 
Another example of the creeping (to put it mildly) of bleeping. DirecTV is now bleeping out swear words on its promos for movies. Didn't do that in the past. And CNN this morning has a segment on swearing at work.....dozens of bleeps there. CNN alone has more than a hundred bleeps every day.

And then there is Jimmy Fallon who is slated to take over from Leno. Leno never swore in twenty years as host. Never had to be bleeped. Carson never swore in decades.. Fallon.....swears just about every show. Bleeped every show. He says the most asinine, unfunny stuff, but because he tosses a swear word in their he gets an awkward laugh. He is the most untalented to the late night performers. NBC again showing its poor judgment.
post #140 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by igreg View Post

Another example of the creeping (to put it mildly) of bleeping. DirecTV is now bleeping out swear words on its promos for movies. Didn't do that in the past. And CNN this morning has a segment on swearing at work.....dozens of bleeps there. CNN alone has more than a hundred bleeps every day.

And then there is Jimmy Fallon who is slated to take over from Leno. Leno never swore in twenty years as host. Never had to be bleeped. Carson never swore in decades.. Fallon.....swears just about every show. Bleeped every show. He says the most asinine, unfunny stuff, but because he tosses a swear word in their he gets an awkward laugh. He is the most untalented to the late night performers. NBC again showing its poor judgment.
Yeah I was hoping Carson Daly would get the Tonight Show. The guy just oozes talent. He really knows how not to get bleeped, which is exactly what I look for in a replacement for Jay Leno.
post #141 of 164
Thread Starter 
Why do 99% of the television commercials HAVE TO HAVE FEEDBACK WHEN THEY SHOW A MICROPHONE!! I don't recall that axiom in my marketing classes.
Now even the American Cancer Society just ran a commercial that began with Jeri Ryan speaking into a mic....and of course, loud, very high-pitched feedback...chalk against the blackboard. Why? And usually it is at the beginning of the commercial so you have no warning to turn the channel. Please.....knock of the feedback when you feature a mic in an ad!

I would not like it but could see it happen every once in a while..but really should not happen at all since the commercial is not live...but freaking 99% of the time. Getting attention by causing irriation is not the way to get a postive reaction.
Edited by igreg - 6/29/13 at 5:47pm
post #142 of 164
Forgive me if this has been covered, but how about how Craig Ferguson's swear words get covered (visually} by a flag and a catch phrase (ooh la la. what's a-comin-a-goin, etc}?
No bleep, no silence, some comedy value.
Edited by crabboy - 6/29/13 at 9:40pm
post #143 of 164
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by crabboy View Post

Forgive me if this has been covered, but how about how Craig Ferguson's swear words get covered (visually} by a flag and a catch phrase (ooh la la. what's a-comin-a-goin, etc}?
No bleep, no silence, some comedy value.

Yes, I like that...but he has plenty of the expletive bleeps in his bunny intros. Heck, I don't even mind the bleeps if they are mild as they are infrequently....but most of the time they are very high-pitch and extended for no good reason.
post #144 of 164
Thread Starter 
Arsenio Hall back after almost two decades, and what does the show have that it never had before? You guessed it.....bleeps. After having no obscenities bleeped out from 1989-1994, Arsenio let loose with two bleeped-out obscenities in the first ten minutes of his second show. More bleeps in ten minutes than in five years. Huh? Why? Apparently he doesn't have the talent to carry the show anymore. Show will be gone before the new year.

I wonder if NBC will continue to let Fallon swear in his monologues when he moves to 11:30? It would be a first after no obscenities uttered by Allen, Parr, Carson, and Leno over six decades. Will Fallon smash that record in one show???
post #145 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by igreg View Post

I wonder if NBC will continue to let Fallon swear in his monologues when he moves to 11:30? It would be a first after no obscenities uttered by Allen, Parr, Carson, and Leno over six decades.
You're overlooking the outrage and flap when Paar said "W.C." during a taping.
Edited by dattier - 9/11/13 at 9:02am
post #146 of 164
I find it intriguing how David Letterman goes about it. When referring to the anal aperture, "Ass" gets through, but "hole" gets bleeped! is there ANY body who can't figure out what he said?
Recently he did a bit on Assad reading an eye chart: "A" "S" "S" (aooga), (aooga), (aooga) (aooga). I happened to have closed captioning on, and after the first three letters, there was nothing.
What's a captioner to do?
post #147 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by crabboy View Post

I find it intriguing how David Letterman goes about it. When referring to the anal aperture, "Ass" gets through, but "hole" gets bleeped! is there ANY body who can't figure out what he said?
Recently he did a bit on Assad reading an eye chart: "A" "S" "S" (aooga), (aooga), (aooga) (aooga). I happened to have closed captioning on, and after the first three letters, there was nothing.
What's a captioner to do?
Since the show is recorded and edited, I would assume they simply blanked over the captioning line at that point...
post #148 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by NetworkTV View Post

Since the show is recorded and edited, I would assume they simply blanked over the captioning line at that point...
This isn't analog video, there's no captioning line. tongue.gif
post #149 of 164
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeremy W View Post

This isn't analog video, there's no captioning line. tongue.gif
In the final program no, but line 21 data is still often used as the source - just converted to CEA-708.

Either way, the principle is the same: just tell the equipment not to pass the captioning for whatever portion you need blanked out.
post #150 of 164
Supposedly the broadcast networks are hurting so badly that they have the FCC proposing to drop the "obscenity" rules. Which is what this bleeping is about. It would bring the US up to date with other counties.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: HDTV Programming
AVS › AVS Forum › HDTV › HDTV Programming › The Creeping of Bleeping