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post #31 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by bbexperience View Post

Interesting. Good information. Probably should have made a purchase a couple of months ago before everything was out of stock in anticipation of the new stuff. Now I'm waffling between a 55" LED and a 60" plasma and I CANNOT make a decision. tongue.gif

Unless you're putting it somewhere that light will shine directly on it, shouldn't be a hard decision, get the plasma. Even if you have to pay a few bucks more, the difference is worth it.
post #32 of 69
Agree. I just picked up a 64" Samsung plasma from Paul's TV for $1,997 delivered.
post #33 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by bd2003 View Post

Unless you're putting it somewhere that light will shine directly on it, shouldn't be a hard decision, get the plasma. Even if you have to pay a few bucks more, the difference is worth it.

Hell even then I'd rather get some decent curtains/shades than pay more for LCD and/or deal with its issues. How much tv are you really watching during a sunny day where reflections are that much of a concern. Most of us work from 8-5 during the week and dont get home till after 6pm, where we get a whopping 2-3 hours of daylight at best. Yes its a different story on the weekends but it still not enough to get me to switch to LCD. Just dont put lamps/lighting directly behind the tv and you are fine. The pro's of plasma big screens (50"-65") still outweigh every other flatscreen technology available in those screen sizes in my opinion. And that probably wont change until 50-60" OLED sets are available for under $2,000. Considering a 50" OLED now runs around $10,000.. plasma big screens will continue to dominate my home for the next 5-7 years.

As I type this, I'm watching the March Madness basketball action in HD on my Vizio 720p 50" plasma. I bought this tv 8 years ago from Costco in 2005.. and it still looks too beautiful too replace. Its only worth about $300 bucks, making it a waste to sell or giveaway. Viewing angles are perfect 180 degrees, colours pop, blacks are dark enough, 99% of my viewing material is no greater than 720p and most importantly I've never had issues with motion in games, sports or the infamous "soap-opera" effect.

For the past few years I've been planning to replace this tv with one of the new 65" 1080p Panny plasmas.. but the old Vizio still kicks too much azz to pull the trigger. With a new home on the horizon, I might as well divert those 65" Panny funds towards a projector & huge screen for the basement home theater. I will say the 60" 1080p LG plasma's I've seen floating around Slickdeals for $600-700 has been incredibly tempting. There's a chance one of these might end up in my next living room, as the old Vizio can always go into another room. The 60" LG is available at Sam's club for $700 any day of the week.

There's even a 3D/Smart TV version of it, now available for $880 with FREE shipping, from Newegg via Ebay: http://www.ebay.com/itm/LG-60-Class-59-8-Diag-1080P-600-Hz-Slim-3D-Plasma-TV-with-Smart-TV-60P-/300878833947?pt=Televisions&hash=item460dc6a91b

LG 60" Class (59.8" Diag.) 1080P 600 Hz Slim 3D Plasma TV with Smart TV 60PQty: 1$879.99
Economy services - FREE
Economy Shipping
Est. delivery between Mon. Mar. 25 - Fri. Apr. 5
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Edited by Daekwan - 3/21/13 at 10:11pm
post #34 of 69
I agree with everything you just said....but stay away from LG plasmas, they tend to have bad input lag. I know the cod crew won't stand for that.
post #35 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by bd2003 View Post

I agree with everything you just said....but stay away from LG plasmas, they tend to have bad input lag. I know the cod crew won't stand for that.

I dont understand why the LG plasmas are so unpopular. But it seems nobody likes them. But their price and bang for the buck features seem unbeatable! I'd love to see a head to head comparison of LG vs other brands, in person, using my own source material. Which would be COD on the 360, ESPN HD, Military channel SD and streaming movies to an AppleTV. Thats easily 90% of my viewing.

Ive even read in the plasma world, even Samsung is better than LG. Meaning if you are looking for top notch plasma you should look Panny>Samsung>LG>Everybody else.
post #36 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daekwan View Post

I dont understand why the LG plasmas are so unpopular. But it seems nobody likes them. But their price and bang for the buck features seem unbeatable! I'd love to see a head to head comparison of LG vs other brands, in person, using my own source material. Which would be COD on the 360, ESPN HD, Military channel SD and streaming movies to an AppleTV. Thats easily 90% of my viewing.

Ive even read in the plasma world, even Samsung is better than LG. Meaning if you are looking for top notch plasma you should look Panny>Samsung>LG>Everybody else.

They're around if you dig hard enough, cnet is usually on top of those. The HT mags seem to do less comparisons but go more in depth. Neither of them are gamer focused, but a little googling will usually find you some input lag tests, and the LGs just don't test well.

I've had both Samsung and Panny plasmas. The Samsung C8000 had absolutely perfect color reproduction, great configurability, a ton of apps, and played back anything you could throw at it over DLNA. An excellent anti-reflective coating too. Input lag was good in game mode, and movies looked perfect in 96hz. But it had really bad IR, and a ton of 3D ghosting. The black level was also nothing special, I've seen better LCDs, and it had crazy firmware bugs that made the black level even worse. The cons outweighed the pros and I was never happy with it. I think I paid like 1600 for a 50" on Black Friday at best buy in 2010.

A year or so later I found a deal on a 60" ST30 at Costco for like 1200. I almost didnt buy it cause it wasnt the top end model, but I really didnt like the C8000. The panny has MUCH better black levels, almost as good color, a lot less 3D ghosting, zero IR. Input lag was just as good. The apps and local playback not nearly so much, but a $50 streamer box can handle that. A little more reflective but not a huge deal, and 48hz is a little flickery but its still decent direct 24p. Still way happier overall, and paid much less for a much better and bigger set. I don't really have an itch to upgrade until someone makes a set where black is absolutely positively black, zero light emission.

Based on my own experiences Id probably blindly stick with Panny going forward. It's not like testing or replacing a TV is a simple affair, you really want to do it right the first time.
post #37 of 69
I don't know much about the LG plasmas, but I do know that the current crop of LG LED offerings are besting the Sammy and Panny Plasmas at input lag (using the Bodnar test device). Not sure what is going on with the 2012 models but it seems like Panny did something that doubled their lag readings pushing them up to ~40ms range. Very disappointing.

I don't like the LG LED picture remotely as much as a plasma but I'm now considering the 60" 7200 model as my most likely option for my living room tv. I have a 120" LED DLP in the theater that is calibrated for critical watching and my 4yo son loves 3d, so I'm leaning towards the option that will let him watch all the 3d tv he can handle and not worry about the glasses. Plus we have a ton of kids sized passive glasses from the theaters laying around.
post #38 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by bd2003 View Post

Unless you're putting it somewhere that light will shine directly on it, shouldn't be a hard decision, get the plasma. Even if you have to pay a few bucks more, the difference is worth it.

I went to check out some tv's this weekend and I must be missing something. Obviously the sets in stores aren't calibrated properly, but that should be the case with all of them. The LED's looked brighter, which was expected, but they also displayed comparable black levels. The sets were all showing college basketball and there were some commercials that had an entirely black screen with some white words. On the LEDs there was some flashlighting present in a few of the sets to varying degrees but these also had the backlights kicked all the way up, and in most of them it was very minor where it was present. So, like I said, I think I'm missing something on this plasma bandwagon. For those that are really pro-plasma, have you seen modern LED sets and if so, what do you think makes plasma better? Not trolling here, I'm still more or less on the fence. I just don't get the plasma love after seeing everything.
post #39 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by bbexperience View Post

I went to check out some tv's this weekend and I must be missing something. Obviously the sets in stores aren't calibrated properly, but that should be the case with all of them. The LED's looked brighter, which was expected, but they also displayed comparable black levels. The sets were all showing college basketball and there were some commercials that had an entirely black screen with some white words. On the LEDs there was some flashlighting present in a few of the sets to varying degrees but these also had the backlights kicked all the way up, and in most of them it was very minor where it was present. So, like I said, I think I'm missing something on this plasma bandwagon. For those that are really pro-plasma, have you seen modern LED sets and if so, what do you think makes plasma better? Not trolling here, I'm still more or less on the fence. I just don't get the plasma love after seeing everything.

You'd never be able to notice the difference in black level in a brightly lit showroom. Way too much ambient light. It's like trying to see stars in the day - they're there, but they're completely drowned out by the light. At home, at evening or night, you'd def notice the difference, especially with dark scenes. And as you say, they're not calibrated. When they are, even with a basic test disc, the plasma will look as good or better. Motion will still be better, 3D much, much better.

LEDs have some things going for them - higher max brightness particularly, which isn't a big deal at home, but an advantage in the showroom.
post #40 of 69
Does anything rumored with the new game consoles coming out in the next year or two change any of this advice?
post #41 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by rmalbers View Post

Does anything rumored with the new game consoles coming out in the next year or two change any of this advice?

Not at all, unless you want to get into 3D, where the plasma advantage is far from subtle.
post #42 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by rmalbers View Post

Does anything rumored with the new game consoles coming out in the next year or two change any of this advice?

If anything "next-gen" consoles will have even faster refresh rates than they do now. Faster rates & 1080p support for all games should be the biggest changes from a display standpoint. Which will make plasma an even more clear choice. Big screen LCD's have problems with fast motion. Pretty much all of them. Low refresh rates, motion artifacts, ghosting, soap-opera effect. LCD tech simply was not designed to be as fast as Plasma.

Both technologies have their pro's & con's. But from a gamer's standpoint unless you have a specific reason to go LCD on a big screen, my suggestion is still to avoid them. LCD's are great at producing super bright whites, colours that pop, stagnant image memory concerns, lowest power consumption, matte/non-reflective screens. If those things are most important to you then its good reason to go LCD. If you are more concerned with best overall picture, darkest blacks, fast motion, sports, gaming, best viewing angles & most bang-for-the-buck. Go plasma.

A pretty popular ISF calibrator who's well known on AVS kept a "chart" of sets that he has worked on. He gave a numerical value to various LCD/LED/PLASMA sets that were pretty popular among consumers. His "chart" hasnt been updated since 2011. But it still gives you a good idea how each technology & manufacter compares to others. Be sure to scroll down to look for the chart. Would be awesome if this chart was constantly updated somewhere on AVS comparing the latest sets: http://hdtvbychadb.com/resources/tv-reviews
Edited by Daekwan - 3/26/13 at 8:55am
post #43 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Daekwan View Post

If anything "next-gen" consoles will have even faster refresh rates than they do now. Faster rates & 1080p support for all games should be the biggest changes from a display standpoint. Which will make plasma an even more clear choice. Big screen LCD's have problems with fast motion. Pretty much all of them. Low refresh rates, motion artifacts, ghosting, soap-opera effect. LCD tech simply was not designed to be as fast as Plasma.

Both technologies have their pro's & con's. But from a gamer's standpoint unless you have a specific reason to go LCD on a big screen, my suggestion is still to avoid them. LCD's are great at producing super bright whites, colours that pop, stagnant image memory concerns, lowest power consumption, matte/non-reflective screens. If those things are most important to you then its good reason to go LCD. If you are more concerned with best overall picture, darkest blacks, fast motion, sports, gaming, best viewing angles & most bang-for-the-buck. Go plasma.

A pretty popular ISF calibrator who's well known on AVS kept a "chart" of sets that he has worked on. He gave a numerical value to various LCD/LED/PLASMA sets that were pretty popular among consumers. His "chart" hasnt been updated since 2011. But it still gives you a good idea how each technology & manufacter compares to others. Be sure to scroll down to look for the chart. Would be awesome if this chart was constantly updated somewhere on AVS comparing the latest sets: http://hdtvbychadb.com/resources/tv-reviews

The biggest knock on plasma for a gamer is IR. Most people say it's more or less a non-issue now but there are others who still experience it. And then there's this ridiculous procedure of running slides for the first 100-200 hours to prevent it. On the LCD team the biggest issue is motion blur. I think most of them do it well now but in many cases you're taking the "soap opera effect" as a trade off, which I couldn't do. However, I think LCD tvs have come a long way in that area from all the research that I've done. Check one out that's got the motion "enhancements" turned off and sports like basketball are not the blurry mess that they used to be. Also, the 3D is really more of an active vs passive question and there are some LCD's out there that do it very well. I don't care at all about 3D but if I did I would be looking for a passive set, which I think are all LCD.

So all that being said, I ended up going with a 60" Panny plasma that I found. It's still sitting here, not hooked up yet, so I'll report back when I get it set up and running. I'm looking forward to it being awesome. It better be since you guys talked me into it. biggrin.gif
post #44 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by bbexperience View Post

And then there's this ridiculous procedure of running slides for the first 100-200 hours to prevent it.

I don't think that's the case anymore. There was a lot of misinformation going around that running slides was the cure for IR, but in reality it was merely used to age the phosphors quicker and evenly so you could calibrate it ASAP. But honestly, IR isn't even worth mentioning anymore when buying a plasma considering most people play in a bright room. Even in a dark room with proper backlighting, IR is a non-issue as far as I'm concerned.
post #45 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big Brad View Post

I don't think that's the case anymore. There was a lot of misinformation going around that running slides was the cure for IR, but in reality it was merely used to age the phosphors quicker and evenly so you could calibrate it ASAP. But honestly, IR isn't even worth mentioning anymore when buying a plasma considering most people play in a bright room. Even in a dark room with proper backlighting, IR is a non-issue as far as I'm concerned.

The 2010 Samsung had really bad IR, you didnt need to look for it...it's always there. Dunno if theyve gotten better. The 2011 Panasonic has effectively zero, so I guess it depends on the set.

Never ran slides for either.
post #46 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by bbexperience View Post

The biggest knock on plasma for a gamer is IR. Most people say it's more or less a non-issue now but there are others who still experience it. And then there's this ridiculous procedure of running slides for the first 100-200 hours to prevent it. On the LCD team the biggest issue is motion blur. I think most of them do it well now but in many cases you're taking the "soap opera effect" as a trade off, which I couldn't do. However, I think LCD tvs have come a long way in that area from all the research that I've done. Check one out that's got the motion "enhancements" turned off and sports like basketball are not the blurry mess that they used to be. Also, the 3D is really more of an active vs passive question and there are some LCD's out there that do it very well. I don't care at all about 3D but if I did I would be looking for a passive set, which I think are all LCD.

So all that being said, I ended up going with a 60" Panny plasma that I found. It's still sitting here, not hooked up yet, so I'll report back when I get it set up and running. I'm looking forward to it being awesome. It better be since you guys talked me into it. biggrin.gif

3D isn't just active vs passive. Crosstalk is still a major issue for games.

On active LCDs, there is a delay in the pixel from changing color to color - for active to work effectively, a pixel might need to change from full black to full white and back 120 times a second. It's challenging even for a top of the line LCD, the end result is that you can see a faint ghost of the image intended for one eye in the other eye. It's *very* distracting, and on an LCD, you can see it even in bright scenes with high contrast.

Passive usually has less ghosting than active on LCD since the pixels are dedicated to each eye, but the polarizing filters in the glasses aren't 100% perfect. And the leader in passive in LG, which are **** for games anyway. Plus, with 3D gaming even on the next gen consoles likely to stay at 720p, the resolution won't be great to begin with, and passive will drop it further to 1280x540.

Plasma still has crosstalk/ghosting, particularly in dark scenes. It's still tough for a plasma to go from full white to black in under 1/120 sec, you'll still see a faint afterglow in dark scenes from any little high contrast object. It doesn't sound like a big deal but it really is, it can be incredibly distracting. You'll see three of everything whitish, like your crosshairs - the object and a ghost on each side. You rarely see it in movies because they check for this stuff and make sure they don't put things in scenes that cause too much of it, but you can't avoid it in a real time game. At least with plasma its limited to the dark scenes.

Which Panasonic did you end up getting?
post #47 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by bd2003 View Post

Passive usually has less ghosting than active on LCD since the pixels are dedicated to each eye, but the polarizing filters in the glasses aren't 100% perfect. And the leader in passive in LG, which are **** for games anyway.
Curious why you say this, LG has some of the lowest input lag times recorded (even besting 2012 Pio Plasma models) which for me is the top priority. Is it the motion blur? Some of their sets in store look awful but I've seen them look better at different stores. My mom has a LG that I game with whenever I visit and I have no problems with it once I got it into game mode (the SOE that I can't seem to turn off on her set makes movie watching intolerable, but that's another story). I just picked one up since BB had a 1 or 2 day sale on the 60" LM7200. Picture quality is sub par, but I'll get a free calibration that might help. But everything else seems pretty decent. It's not going to be my critical viewing set anyway, its going over the fireplace and will be the set my son uses to watch his pop out movies and play Kinect on.
post #48 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by CoreyM View Post

Curious why you say this, LG has some of the lowest input lag times recorded (even besting 2012 Pio Plasma models) which for me is the top priority. Is it the motion blur? Some of their sets in store look awful but I've seen them look better at different stores. My mom has a LG that I game with whenever I visit and I have no problems with it once I got it into game mode (the SOE that I can't seem to turn off on her set makes movie watching intolerable, but that's another story). I just picked one up since BB had a 1 or 2 day sale on the 60" LM7200. Picture quality is sub par, but I'll get a free calibration that might help. But everything else seems pretty decent. It's not going to be my critical viewing set anyway, its going over the fireplace and will be the set my son uses to watch his pop out movies and play Kinect on.

It's just that every LG TV I've ever been interested in has been rated to have bad lag. The first was the original passive 3D LCD set, I forget the model. Then recently, a friend of mine was about to buy an LG plasma on sale, looked up the lag, and it rated poorly again. Maybe I've just had an unlucky sampling, but every time I've cared to look, they've rated poorly. Could be I just was interested in the odd ones out, just goes to show you how you need to check each individual model out.
post #49 of 69
2012 Sammy Plasma smile.gif
post #50 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by bd2003 View Post

It's just that every LG TV I've ever been interested in has been rated to have bad lag. The first was the original passive 3D LCD set, I forget the model. Then recently, a friend of mine was about to buy an LG plasma on sale, looked up the lag, and it rated poorly again. Maybe I've just had an unlucky sampling, but every time I've cared to look, they've rated poorly. Could be I just was interested in the odd ones out, just goes to show you how you need to check each individual model out.
I've been using http://www.displaylag.com/display-database/ as my go to lately.
post #51 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by CoreyM View Post

I've been using http://www.displaylag.com/display-database/ as my go to lately.

That's what I use as well, and LG is rated highly.

The one I got was the P60U50. Last year's low end model but it still rated really well for what I needed and I got a good price.
post #52 of 69
For gaming, I personally prefer monitors. There are too many factors in gaming and environment, as a whole, to recommend a single tech. It comes down to personal preference and gaming habits.
post #53 of 69
So, I have a problem here. On 30 fps games (playing Red Dead Redemption right now) the judder when panning side to side is pretty bad. Reminds me of my pc gaming days when you'd have a video card that couldn't handle the graphics. Those of you that game on plasmas, is this something inherent to the tech or do you think it's this set? I've got all the noise reduction and extra stuff turned off. I'm coming from a dlp which showed no signs of this so it's really distracting.
post #54 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by bbexperience View Post

So, I have a problem here. On 30 fps games (playing Red Dead Redemption right now) the judder when panning side to side is pretty bad. Reminds me of my pc gaming days when you'd have a video card that couldn't handle the graphics. Those of you that game on plasmas, is this something inherent to the tech or do you think it's this set? I've got all the noise reduction and extra stuff turned off. I'm coming from a dlp which showed no signs of this so it's really distracting.

DLPs have a little blur, you're probably just used to it. Frames come out much cleaner on plasma, like CRTs. Its something inherent to the tech, kind of how good speakers make low bitrate MP3s sound worse, because you can actually hear how bad they are. I'm pretty sure RDR has a shaky frame rate to begin with though. And its not like a locked 30 is all that great anyway.
post #55 of 69
Beyond auto racing telecast and widescreen videogames, I primarily watch 4:3 television shows from earlier decades and Academy ratio movies from the Golden Age of Hollywood (Which is very close to 4:3). And much of my time when I am on my PS3 or Xbox 360, it's playing classic videogames with either black pillarboxing or static recreations of arcade game artwork to fill the sides of the screen.

I was always under the impression that a lot of pillarboxing could be a problem over time with a plasma. Particularly in the winter when series like Formula One take a break, I can go weeks with the only 16:9 material being the channel guide on my cable box, some fast forwarded commercials and such when watching things recorded on the DVR off channels like Turner Classic Movies and Me-TV (Which is a classic tv station like TVLand started out to be and Nick at Nite before it), and some widescreen menus on DVD/HD-DVD/Blu-Ray discs before getting to what I want to watch that's pillarboxed.

So there's no risk (If there ever was) these days that the black pillarboxing could lead to IR and possibly become permanent over time? Stretching things to fill the screen when I'm playing 4:3 and 3:4 arcade games on something like Midway Arcade Origins or watching a classic movie or TV show isn't an option since it's original aspect ratio only as far as I'm concerned (And sometimes with something like Mrs. Miniver on Blu-Ray, there's no way to make the player or HDTV stretch it even if I wanted to).

I figure that 75% to 90% of the time, the outer side edges of my tv aren't displaying anything but black pillarboxing.
Edited by Leo_Ames - 3/27/13 at 3:51pm
post #56 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leo_Ames View Post

Beyond auto racing telecast and widescreen videogames, I primarily watch 4:3 television shows from earlier decades and Academy ratio movies from the Golden Age of Hollywood (Which is very close to 4:3). And much of my time when I am on my PS3 or Xbox 360, it's playing classic videogames with either black pillarboxing or static recreations of arcade game artwork to fill the sides of the screen.

I was always under the impression that a lot of pillarboxing could be a problem over time with a plasma. Particularly in the winter when series like Formula One take a break, I can go weeks with the only 16:9 material being the channel guide on my cable box, some fast forwarded commercials and such when watching things recorded on the DVR off channels like Turner Classic Movies and Me-TV (Which is a classic tv station like TVLand started out to be and Nick at Nite before it), and some widescreen menus on DVD/HD-DVD/Blu-Ray discs before getting to what I want to watch that's pillarboxed.

So there's no risk (If there ever was) these days that the black pillarboxing could lead to IR and possibly become permanent over time? Stretching things to fill the screen when I'm playing 4:3 and 3:4 arcade games on something like Midway Arcade Origins or watching a classic movie or TV show isn't an option since it's original aspect ratio only as far as I'm concerned (And sometimes with something like Mrs. Miniver on Blu-Ray, there's no way to make the player or HDTV stretch it even if I wanted to).

As long as you use grey bars instead of black bars, you dont need to worry about it. I've seen plasmas with widescreen burn-in in showrooms, so its possible....how much effort it takes to get there, I'm not sure. But the grey bars are there for a reason. If you really do spend the majority of your time watching 4:3, I wouldnt use black bars.
post #57 of 69
I've never noticed the option to select the color of pillarboxing (Or letterboxing) for anything. How would I go about doing that if I were to acquire a plasma?
post #58 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by bd2003 View Post

DLPs have a little blur, you're probably just used to it. Frames come out much cleaner on plasma, like CRTs. Its something inherent to the tech, kind of how good speakers make low bitrate MP3s sound worse, because you can actually hear how bad they are. I'm pretty sure RDR has a shaky frame rate to begin with though. And its not like a locked 30 is all that great anyway.

I still have the DLP so I went back and did an A/B comparison of the two sets in the same scene, panning back and forth. The DLP does have blur, it's just different. On the DLP it's more of a true 'blur'. On the plasma it's more of a doubling effect. It's hard to explain. The plasma seems more juddery I guess. Right now it's a little hard on the eyes but maybe I'll get used to it. I'm going to take the box over to my in-laws this weekend to test it on an LCD, just to see what the difference is.

On the plus side, the plasma picture is much improved over the old DLP. Blacks are much deeper and even and everything looks crisper. I think that's due in part to the glass panel vs the plastic screen on the DLP. If it weren't for this motion thing right now I would have no issue with it whatsoever.
post #59 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by bbexperience View Post

I still have the DLP so I went back and did an A/B comparison of the two sets in the same scene, panning back and forth. The DLP does have blur, it's just different. On the DLP it's more of a true 'blur'. On the plasma it's more of a doubling effect. It's hard to explain. The plasma seems more juddery I guess. Right now it's a little hard on the eyes but maybe I'll get used to it. I'm going to take the box over to my in-laws this weekend to test it on an LCD, just to see what the difference is.

On the plus side, the plasma picture is much improved over the old DLP. Blacks are much deeper and even and everything looks crisper. I think that's due in part to the glass panel vs the plastic screen on the DLP. If it weren't for this motion thing right now I would have no issue with it whatsoever.

Yup....that's definitely what happens when you take a 30fps game, and put it on a quality display. It looks like there's a doubling because an object moves so far across the screen in 1/30th of a second, that your brain isn't fooled into seeing it as a single object in motion. The difference is that without the blur, you can see it clearly.

You don't really notice it in movies because there's natural motion blur (which is a very good thing, not all blur is created equal). Current gen consoles generally don't have the power to put out high quality motion blur, but it'll but much less a problem next gen, even at 30fps.
post #60 of 69
Real late to the party here, but why are LCDs so unpopular? All this talk of inaccurate blacks, bad motion resolution/blur...

I own a 2008 Bravia LCD, and I frikking love it! My primary use is X360 gaming, and watching regular DVDs, upscaled to 1080p of course. Just love it!

Just my 2.
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