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The Stonewater Cinema Build Thread - Page 18

post #511 of 897
Thread Starter 
Side-Project Update, not theater related

As I said before, I had some mandatory projects on my "honey-do" list before I could realistically continue work on the theater without risking my own health, safety and well-being in the eyes of my wife. Husbands, you know what I mean.... biggrin.gif Anyhow, the first update is constructing the nursery for our little one. I know what you are saying . . . this should have been done before our child was born. And you're right, it should have. But right after I finished the major construction on the room, my wife was ordered on mandatory bedrest because she was having a difficult high-risk pregnancy. So I couldn't spray the oil-based primer in the room without feeling there would be some sort of detrimental odor of curing fumes that a pregnant woman shouldn't be near, no matter how much I tried to block off and force-ventilate the room. And of course the same fumes wouldn't be friendly for an early term baby either, so I was stuck waiting until the wife and baby could stay overnight with a local friend for a weekend.

One quick note on the room design and a warning to all those with significant others....Pinterest is the most evil website known to man and will have your weekends filled with 'great ideas' before you know it. We were originally just going to paint, so I thought my involvement level in the nursery project was going to be confined to a long day of painting two coats. But my wife saw an entryway wainscot design someone had put together in an afternoon with MDF and said she "would like me to do this in the nursery." Of course I opened up my big mouth and saw an opportunity to improve on the design with more trim moldings. *SIGH* sometimes my filter just doesn't work when I need it to. Anyhow, 6 different moldings plus the MDF later, the following is what I ended up with. My wife is ecstatic the way it turned out and loves to show it off to visiting friends and family, which really made all of the effort worthwhile in the end.

Ironically I never took a 'before' pic, but you'll just have to use your imagination of a plain, empty room with nothing in it, painted the standard builder's white. There was no crown molding, only base and case. On to the pics....

First, I ripped sheets of 1/2" MDF into rails and stiles. I wanted a 5.5" reveal which meant the bottom piece had to be just under 11" so once I applied the base molding I would have a consistent reveal. The top piece was also a bit taller to accommodate the cove molding and still leave the same 5.5" reveal on top. Sorry for the crappy cell phone pic, but it's literally the only one I have and I took no in-process pics.


Once the MDF was finished, I modified and re-installed the base molding and started installation of base cap molding on the inside of every MDF frame. Here's a pic where you can see the panel with and without the molding.




The nursery has a funky neo-angle wall which required 22.5 degree rip cuts on the MDF. If you look closely, you'll see the original outlets and the original switch locations had to be moved. In fact, all but one electrical box had to be moved in the entire room. Two had to be moved so significantly that it required a full-on drywall patch job before even installing the MDF. I thought I could get away with these two....but I ended up having to move them slightly and using a couple of old work electrical boxes.


You can slightly see one of the full patch jobs here as the original outlet was directly behind the vertical stile to the left:


Cove and a custom cap molding made from window stool mold was added:


All small imperfections with either sanded and/or caulked. Painters tape was tucked underneath the base mold so I had a nice edge to attach my 3 mil plastic to protect the carpet while spraying:


You can see I moved the switch box and receptacle in this picture. Switch box was also expanded to a 2-gang so I could add a switch for a new ceiling fan. Naturally, it was 95 degrees outside in July when I ventured up into the attic to add the bracing and ceiling box for the new ceiling fan. mad.gif


Other side prepped and ready to go:


Crown molding was installed in the room, nail holes filled, caulked and sanded:




Room plastic'd off and force-ventilated with a standard box fan with a 20x20 filter taped to it:


First coat of primer. After drying, I hand-sanded 100% of these surfaces, wiped them off and applied a second coat of primer. My sanding fingers and shoulders were sore!!!




The whole room was in a fog when spraying, but cleared out reasonably quick




After the second coat of primer dried, I again hand-sanded 100% before applying the first coat of paint:


Here is after the second coat of paint. That filter was getting clogged by the second!!




A picture showing the kind of "fog" that hung heavy in the room with the overspray. Not the most fun of days....


Room cleaned up, upper walls painted, crown molding painted. You can see the new ceiling fan box. I hadn't originally planned to paint the ceiling, but the original builder "antique white" made it look like there was a 10 pack a day smoker imprisoned in the room. So I ended up mixing about 15% of the wall color into a new gallon of flat white paint to give the ceiling a slight matching tint and to provide a bit more contrast against the semi-gloss white crown moldings:








I blended the edge of the 1/2" MDF with the drywall return of the window to make it look like one solid piece. I think it turned out pretty well!




It didn't take long to move our little man in to the room. He was kickin' away in his new digs!!


I'll edit this post with the final pics of the room which I can take once everyone is up this morning.
post #512 of 897
Just wait until he's big enough to start painting and scratching the walls... wink.gif


Great job. Very nice method, more solid and probably much cheaper than the fake kits I've used once. Good reference if I ever attempt this.
post #513 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by just jim View Post

To replicate them with a wood veneer, try covering MDF. If the steps are 1/4", start with a strip of 5/8" MDF and seal the edge (slightly diluted carpenters glue (10% water) and let dry) then edge band it with a 1/4 x 3/4" strip of solid. Use a edge trimmer to router the solid flush with the MDF faces. Install the veneer onto the two good faces and trim. Now run this edged strip through a good table saw with a good blade (so the cut is smooth) to split it into two 1/4" strips. MDF is very stable, as I think you already know. Look at the MDF mouldings at a large moulding supplier/manufacturer, I'm sure I've seen a large Cove moulding that you could rap and even edge with a piece of solid. For the the curve, I'd use spray contact adhesive and as many hands as you can round up. Use a strip of kitchen wax paper on the cove to prevent accidental contact! After touching the leading edge, pull the wax paper out about an inch and roll a 1"-ish dowel back and forth to make a smooth bond and pull the paper out another inch...

OR, use the foam and find someone who can paint a faux finish grain on it! Seriously! If done in place the grain could span over the joints! I've seen faux walnut grain that you could not tell from real. In bright light and close-up. It even had depth because of the alternating layers of paint and shellac.

Thanks for the suggestions, Jim. I'll have to continue to mull it over a bit. Using your proposed method, I could get a crisp 90 degree edge on the stepped molding, but couldn't get the rounded over part. I was thinking about this problem yesterday and came up with a plan that would involve four pieces of solid stock. I would have to have solid stock ripped lengthwise with a bandsaw in 1/4" strips and then brought over to the table saw to be cut to final dimensions. There seems to be no way around making the solid pieces progressively deeper to provide the necessary backing for each layer. True, I could probably cheat a bit and have Baltic Birch or similar form the rest of the pack-out, but I don't know if that's worth all of the extra fuss.

The other problems with this polyurethane molding are cost, cost and scale. The molding itself is nearly $12 per foot and I had called a faux painter who wanted quite a bit to custom-match the African Mahogany finish, essentially doubling my price. If I use my neighbor's awesome workshop with band saw, planer, router table, table saw, etc., it is conceivable for me to make these moldings at a scale that fits my theater space. The molding is just over 10" wide, which is way too much for my skinny soffit width, so I will probably go with this design and scale it by half(ish). That should save a lot of material as well.

I guess I'll just have to think about it a bit more before proceeding. Fortunately I have some time on this decision, though.
post #514 of 897
Nursery looks awesome! Well done.
post #515 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nightlord View Post

Great job. Very nice method, more solid and probably much cheaper than the fake kits I've used once. Good reference if I ever attempt this.

Thanks. I never did an exact tally of all the costs...but all of the moldings, MDF, nails, construction adhesive, wood glue, etc. were around $400. Paint and all of the ancillary supplies (thinner, plastic, blue tape, caulking, sanding sponges, etc.) was about $200. All of the new receptacles, screwless wall plates, Lutron Maestro switches, ceiling fan box, romex and the ceiling fan itself were about $175. So all-totaled it was a $750 - $800 transformation for the room. Not too bad for such a dramatic change. I can only imagine what it would have cost to hire out all the professionals needed to complete this room and all of its various steps....$2 - $3k in total labor costs in addition to the materials? I'm not sure because it's been so long since I actually hired a contractor!

I also just spent another $350 on a fancy schmancy closet system with drawers and built-in hamper that will be delivered next week. This will give us more storage for "stuff" and allow triple hanging levels of all the baby clothes. It should be delivered and installed next week and then the room is officially DONE! biggrin.gif
post #516 of 897
Nice work.................looks like a happy baby! cool.gif
post #517 of 897
Looks terrific. Nice job.
post #518 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by J_P_A View Post

Oh, and don't forget. WD-40 works miracles for getting Green Glue off of...... well, just about everything!
Quote:
Originally Posted by cw5billwade View Post

agree also use it when ever the dispencer starts getting hard to fill. Found out the hard way I am like man this stuff is thick. After WD40 not so much easier to apply as well.

Oh yeah, I forgot to mention....WD40 fixes everything!!

post #519 of 897
Fantastic transformation and general class-up of that room! Lucky little guy... smile.gif
post #520 of 897
Great job on the nursery! How difficult was it to move all of the electrical boxes? If the original box only had enough slack in the romex to wire up the existing duplex, what did you end up doing when the box had to move 1' or 2' down the wall? Did you have to pull new wire to avoid hidden splices?
Edited by Spaceman - 8/21/13 at 7:16pm
post #521 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spaceman View Post

Great job on the nursery! How difficult was it to move all of the electrical boxes? If the original box only had enough slack in the romex to wire up the existing duplex, what did you end up doing when the box had to move 1' or 2' down the wall? Did you have to pull new wire to avoid hidden splices?

Thanks Spaceman! Moving the electrical boxes was not easy for 3 of them. Fortunately I took a zillion pictures of the house during construction, just before they closed up the walls. This allowed me to see how the lines were run and which direction it appeared I had more slack to move the receptacle. Worked like a charm for two of them, but for the last I ended up slightly tugging on the romex itself within the wall to free it from the Romex staple to get the needed slack. I cheated the outlet up a bit to make sure I had enough wire for my connections to be fully in the box. For the hot line to the main switch, I went into my attic and moved piles of blown-in insulation around to identify potential slack I could capture from more efficient routing. I ended up getting the 3 or 4 inches I needed, so that was a big relief. I was fortunate to avoid running new lines, that's for sure.
post #522 of 897
Thread Starter 
Side-Project #2 - Coffered Ceiling - not theater related

The other large project that kept me out of theater was a big coffered ceiling project my wife wanted installed in our main living area.

This was the original plan from the builder. It looks nice, but is made of painted drywall and was a $4800 option. Plus it was a standard tic-tac-toe board which is a bit boring.


A neighbor in our development has the same house style we do and forked over the $4800 for their drywall ceiling:


So I said if I was going to do a coffered ceiling, I was going to do it out of stain-grade wood and set it at a diagonal. So I drew up a quick hand-sketch....er.....I mean engineering drawing....


I rarely, if ever, hire professional help. But this was a case where I needed skilled help and not just a second set of hands, so I hired a finish carpenter who was willing to allow me to work alongside instead of having him bring in even more professionals. I ordered all the material based on my design and spent the next week or so staining all of the lumber (no picture of the setup, sorry!). Once complete, we scheduled a time to get the job going where I could take off from work.

Here's a few before pics after I emptied the room of everything, removed the ceiling fan and stacked our furniture anywhere I could find a spare foot of space


Make note of the HVAC duct locations....that will come up later....




First, we discussed and almost immediately ditched the perimeter beam I was showing in my drawing and instead decided to run everything right to the drywall. We then recalculated the size of the boxes, squared the room and started snapping some lines for the layout. Right out of the gate we f'ed up where were snapping the lines, so we had all kinds of extra lines, adding to the hilarity of constantly looking to see which red line was the correct one (sigh)


Then, it was on to attaching some #2 grade 1x6 pine to the ceiling with a dab of adhesive and 2.5" finish nails into the studding where we could




Remember those HVAC ducts? Yeah, the layout couldn't have been more over top one of the ducts and far too close for the other. In short, they both had to be moved. Pics on that later.


Once the ceiling blocking was complete, we moved on to cutting 7.5" base mold which I was installing upside down. We had five full boxes, so we cut 20 pieces identically with 45 degree mitered corners and glued / finish nailed them together perfectly on the ground


Then it was just a matter of both of us lifting them to the ceiling and firing nails into the side of the 1x6 ceiling strapping to attach


Before moving further, we had to move the supply lines. After I removed the diffuser, it was apparent that there were large metal flanges that extended between the drywall and studding, making removal impossible.....or so we thought. After debating it over a cup of coffee, we decided to cut holes large enough that I could crawl up inside my ceiling with a battery powered sawzall to cut the metal tabs. So that's what we did. Thankfully I had a bunch of extra HVAC supplies on-hand from the basement so I was able to reuse everything and just remove 4' or so of ducting length from each supply line. I then blocked for the new vent and patched the holes to immediately get the compound drying




And since my luck was running hot, I come to find out that the ceiling fan box was also four inches off center in the room. So I ended up tearing into that, moving the box and patching


All the boxes installed


Next, we moved on to the legs of each area that abuts the drywall




Completed the base molding


Next, it was on to the crown. I chose 5.25" Curtis Crown molding. The procedure was the same....make the crown molding "box" on the floor out of mitered pieces and lift into position


Now here is where hiring the pro became VERY helpful. We had an incredibly tight miter with a 123 degree interior angle. Well, nobody's saw goes that high, so we had to make a jig. After more than a few attempts (before we discovered the jig was moving in relation to the blade), we had our final jig template. The length of this miter cut was almost 11 inches long!! eek.gif







There were a couple of other funky dimensions to figure out as well, but nothing my digital protractor couldn't handle with aplomb


Crown almost complete, all of my bad chalk lines primered, 2nd coat of mud on all the drywall patches. I had a long night wiring for recessed lighting inside the coffers, taking care to either trim or bend away the hundreds of finish nails. Even being careful, my hands looked like I fought off 5 wild cats.


So after finishing the crown the following morning, we moved on to the stain grade 1x6 pine, cutting holes for recessed lighting where needed. In total, I added 12 lights to the coffered ceiling and 2 3" gimbel lights that aim toward the fireplace




You'll notice more clearly in this picture that I recessed the 1x6 slightly. The reason for this is I wanted to add some visual interest and not just have a flat coffer. I therefore bought and stained some door stop moldings and I used a little 6" piece to set the depth of the 1x6 entirely by feel, stopping when the door stop was even with the baseboard.




Door stop installed on the right side of this beam, not the left to illustrate the difference in look


Ran short on door stop by two sticks mad.gif


Ceiling carpentry complete!


Next, I moved on to painting. I quite literally just found my wall paint color and chose a shade exactly two shades lighter on the little paper color thingys. There was NO WAY I was risking bumping any of the finish carpentry, especially since I didn't have the nail holes filled or the wood polyurethaned. I normally never tape and can cut in well, but this was my insurance policy against bumps. It was a nice change to fire paint to the edge with reckless abandon! Taping took forever, fyi.




I cut the holes in the drywall for the two gimbel lights


Fully taped and ready for paint


You can see the dramatic difference between the original white and the tan color




I painted two coats and removed the tape


Tape free!


No pictures, but I then filled thousands of nail holes and gave all the wood a first coat of satin polyurethane Next, I sanded and the spray painted with high-temp paint 12 recessed trims and installed the the lighting. The flash is showing unstained areas you cannot see in real life.




The final result!!





So now you know what else had been soaking up all my time. There was a third, smaller project - a new gas fireplace in the Master Bedroom. Everything is framed, electrical installed, drywall, durock but I haven't got to finishing the drywall or adding the marble tile to the hearth and surround. Probably over the next several weeks I'll tidy that one up as well and post some pics.
Edited by TMcG - 8/22/13 at 8:31am
post #523 of 897
Wow! Nice job. Great ceiling biggrin.gif
post #524 of 897
First the nursery. Then a coffered ceiling. And now, a master bedroom fireplace. You have to stay focused, man. There is a theater to finish!
post #525 of 897
Well done in there. This is very similar to what my wife wants to do in our basement. I too am mired in the 'get the rest done before the theater' situation. I like it when people take a moment to show off other work they are doing. Its a nice change of pace and can spur ideas for others to even use in their theaters or other spaces.
Good work!
post #526 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spaceman View Post

First the nursery. Then a coffered ceiling. And now, a master bedroom fireplace. You have to stay focused, man. There is a theater to finish!

More like photographic evidence that after my foot injury and in between my busy work travel schedule and the new baby I had two very sizable projects on my mandatory "honey-do" list that I had to take care of before my wife freaked out. The nursery is the easy project to understand....the coffered ceiling, not so much. But it was one of those things that my wife has been asking me to do for the better part of two years and it was the final project on the entire first floor of our home. With all the family coming into town for the new baby, I guess this was part of feathering the nest. All I know is that she doesn't ask for a lot, was hormonal and really wanted me to finish the two top floors with every little project before finishing the basement and theater. This probably doesn't make any sense to anyone but my wife, but ....you know....happy wife, happy life! biggrin.gif

The master bedroom fireplace is *nothing* to finish from a time perspective compared to the basement, that's for sure.

As a bit of a progress update, I went down into the basement right after dinner with all kinds of fire and brimstone to install the wall brackets. At the first sign of my impact driver securing lumber between the joists for mounting the bracket, my wife said that the noise was disturbing the baby. ARGH!!! mad.gif I might have to push everything to the weekend because I have no other time to work on it other than in the evening during the week.
post #527 of 897
Quote:
Originally Posted by TMcG View Post

but ....you know....happy wife, happy life! biggrin.gif

+1
post #528 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skip-B View Post

Well done in there. This is very similar to what my wife wants to do in our basement. I too am mired in the 'get the rest done before the theater' situation. I like it when people take a moment to show off other work they are doing. Its a nice change of pace and can spur ideas for others to even use in their theaters or other spaces.
Good work!

Thanks Skip! And you're right - wainscot and coffered ceilings are commonly found in theaters....these projects just happen to be in different rooms of my house.

I don't know if you've gone through the whole thread or not, but a lot of folks have expressed the same opinion that they like to see all of the other little side-projects. To that end, once the theater shell, baffle wall, screen wall and soffit work are complete, I plan to turn the theater into a giant storage room for all the "stuff" while I finish the rest of the basement. My guess is there will be a 4-6 week hiatus on the theater while the rest of the basement gets finished (i.e. another mandatory project to have complete by Thanksgiving when family comes), but then it's right back to the theater's riser, finish carpentry, soundproof door, carpet and fabric panels to finish things up. And, oh yeah, two DIY subwoofers.

The other thing I'll mention is that I am doing a whole-home audio/video distribution system with Savant home automation. I considered a separate thread, but I'm just going to roll with it here since everything will be fully integrated and tied together.
post #529 of 897
Holy cow! Very impressive (again) and I love how you don't settle for just "good enough". Tackling that 45-degree pattern definitely kicked it up a notch (or three), but the results certainly justify all the work!!

Nicely done. Hopefully with the fireplace done soon, you'll get a full-time hall pass for the HT! smile.gif
post #530 of 897
I really like that ceiling. Good job! smile.gif
post #531 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by cowger View Post

Holy cow! Very impressive (again) and I love how you don't settle for just "good enough". Tackling that 45-degree pattern definitely kicked it up a notch (or three), but the results certainly justify all the work!!

Nicely done. Hopefully with the fireplace done soon, you'll get a full-time hall pass for the HT! smile.gif

Thanks Cowger! Honestly, I don't even hold a candle to your level of woodworking expertise which is truly a step above. In fact I'd be perfectly comfortable hiring you out for the finish carpentry for my theater!! biggrin.gif

And I told my wife straight-out that the fireplace would be moving forward, but as a concurrent project and not the highest priority to finish at break-neck speed. Besides, I am using "EMPERADOR DARK" marble tiles since slabs were not available. To make the tiles look like a slab, I sent them to an outside fabricator to be bullnosed and polished at certain cut points while lining up all the graining to complete the look, so I won't even have the tiles back for a couple of weeks. When I get them back, I'll be installing with no to minimal grout lines.

Quote:
Originally Posted by NickTheGreat View Post

I really like that ceiling. Good job! smile.gif

Thanks Nick. I have one more coffered ceiling to go in my basement above the 9' slate pool table.....
Edited by TMcG - 8/23/13 at 3:37am
post #532 of 897
Really nice! I was going to construct my coffered ceiling using a different method.. but I like your method wayyyy better. Congrats, everything looks awesome.

Tim
post #533 of 897
TMcG might have all of you guys fooled, but I'm on to him. I think he's practicing for the theater in the rest of the house. Practice makes perfect and all.

Looks great, BTW!
post #534 of 897
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr.Tim View Post

Really nice! I was going to construct my coffered ceiling using a different method.. but I like your method wayyyy better. Congrats, everything looks awesome.

Tim

Thanks Tim. Glad you were able to pick up a couple of tips....I've certainly learned from your build and posts, that's for sure.

Quote:
Originally Posted by J_P_A View Post

TMcG might have all of you guys fooled, but I'm on to him. I think he's practicing for the theater in the rest of the house. Practice makes perfect and all.

Looks great, BTW!

Shhhhhhhhhhhh!!! smile.gif
post #535 of 897
Amazing!!! .... Not only are you Injured, Coping wonderfully with a beautiful new born, and found a way to please a hormonal wife with a pin interest addiction, but you've managed to do so with absolutely "STELLAR" results.eek.gif

Personally, I felt a serious wave of inadequacy wash over me after reading your recent update's. tongue.gif

Can't wait for more..biggrin.gif

Brad

P.S. The rail on the wainscoting looks like the perfect place to start the Hotweels collection!! & My wife quit showing me Pin interest ideas after the pearlite garden container fiasco-which permanantely stained her favorite sweats and a garage floor somewhere.... sometimes it pays not to be a perfectionist....wink.gif
post #536 of 897
Wow! There's build posts and then there is just plain showing-off!!! smile.gif amazing work. Looking forward to more.
post #537 of 897
Thread Starter 
Update:

As much as I hate to do it, I am going to be swapping my 44 sheets of 7/16" OSB that I was going to use as the first layer in the theater to thicker 19/32" sheets. When I originally bought my OSB, the price per 7/16" sheet was $13.42 and the 19/32" was over $27. Fast forward to today and those prices have fallen greatly to where the 19/32" stuff is just under $17 per sheet. I talked with the manager of Home Depot this morning and he said that they would be happy to exchange my material at the price I paid for the thicker OSB at current pricing. All totaled it will cost me about $200.....$170 for the difference in materials and $20 for the rental truck, plus fuel.

I am sick to my stomach at the thought of hauling more sheet goods, but I know I'd kick myself if I didn't take advantage of this opportunity to go that extra "nth" degree. Plus the mass will help with soundproofing and the extra thickness will allow for significantly more grip. So guess what I'll be doing tonight or tomorrow morning???
Quote:
Originally Posted by KNKKNK View Post

Amazing!!! .... Not only are you Injured, Coping wonderfully with a beautiful new born, and found a way to please a hormonal wife with a pin interest addiction, but you've managed to do so with absolutely "STELLAR" results.eek.gif

Personally, I felt a serious wave of inadequacy wash over me after reading your recent update's. tongue.gif

Can't wait for more..biggrin.gif

Brad

P.S. The rail on the wainscoting looks like the perfect place to start the Hotweels collection!! & My wife quit showing me Pin interest ideas after the pearlite garden container fiasco-which permanantely stained her favorite sweats and a garage floor somewhere.... sometimes it pays not to be a perfectionist....wink.gif

Thanks Brad, that's an overly-generous comment, especially coming from someone who has (had) among the best hand-crafted theaters on this forum and puts most pro builds to shame! I'll try to live up to your expectations and I hope to get your feedback for my finish carpentry to turn out even 1/2 as good as yours...

Quote:
Originally Posted by gdfein View Post

Wow! There's build posts and then there is just plain showing-off!!! smile.gif amazing work. Looking forward to more.

Thanks gdfein! Glad to have you following along.
post #538 of 897
my back just shed a tear for you....
post #539 of 897
just saying want to see the cat scratch hands eek.gif

Great work makes me kind of wish I went the wood route on my coffers but drywall will have to do. Going to paint them red to match carpet.
post #540 of 897
Holy Moley!

You have been a busy, busy boy! I'll cut you some slack on the theater progress seeing your handy work in the other two rooms. Fantastic work my friend, well done. Looks like you are well on your way to meeting the Thanksgiving deadline set by the Mrs.

Regards,

RTROSE
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