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future proofing?

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
I am building a mancave - 16' X 24' X 9' in the basement with a flat screen at one end and a bar at the other. I have all the speakers, equipment and wiring figured out. But what should I put in for future-proogfing? Power and wire for a projector? Extra wire or optical for 4k or 8k, etc.?
Thanks, Tom
post #2 of 7
Flex conduit from the display area (and from the future PJ mount location) to the A/V gear area. Lots of extra cat5e/cat6, too (outside the conduit - leave it empty).
post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 
2" or so? Maybe pass a string through for future ease? Any brands recommended?
TIA, Tom
post #4 of 7
Carlson Resi Gard is a popular brand, but your local electric supply store may carry a different line of flexible PVC conduit. 1.5 inch minimum. Again, leave it empty of cables, until you need it, 5 years from now.

Decide on lighting control, before wiring electric. Wire a few spots for subwoofers, as you may not know the best position, and you may elect for 2 down the road.

I like in-wall speakers for surround speakers, for a better appearance.
post #5 of 7
The future is cat 6 and fibre.

Run cat 6 alongside fibre in your walls. Terminations will come down in time. Its cheaper than throwing conduit in the walls and a hell of a lot easier.

HDMI 1.4a will support 4k 3d resolution so your probably safe as far as that goes for the next 10 years.

The future of TV content is the internet. Make sure you have a direct pull from your tv to your router and from your receiver to your router. (I ran cat 6 and fibre).


If you want to go nuts, try to get your hands on cat 7. Cat 7a is rumored to handle 40G to 100Gbit/sec.
post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by cnd_beancounter View Post

The future is cat 6 and fibre.
Run cat 6 alongside fibre in your walls. Terminations will come down in time. Its cheaper than throwing conduit in the walls and a hell of a lot easier.

Sorry, going to 100% disagree. Fiber in-the-home has "been the future" for 20 years. Stll may be, but probably not. The ubiquity and capability of category cable surpasses what can reasonably be expected for residential A/V and home networking in the years to come. Conduit may be more expensive than fiber, per foot, but it's the only thing that can be truly future-proof.
Quote:
HDMI 1.4a will support 4k 3d resolution so your probably safe as far as that goes for the next 10 years.
The future of TV content is the internet. Make sure you have a direct pull from your tv to your router and from your receiver to your router. (I ran cat 6 and fibre).

And hence why we won't need fiber, as this can all be accomplished easily by cat6 (really mostly by cat5e, too). If TV comes from the Internet, the service provider will deliver that to your house (perhaps by fiber, doesn't matter as we're not the ones installing it). Those services, in order to be successful in the marketplace, will HAVE to work with the wiring in the majority of homes - which means RG6 (or 59) and Cat5e. So ensure you can handle what those products are expecting you to have (in other words - don't be weird!).

Running flex conduit to *key* locations for futureproofing, IMO, is the best tradeoff of cost vs. function. Probably don't need to run flex conduit to every possible display location, as most of them will be served well with RG6+category (x2-3), using either local, remote, or provider/streaming content.
Quote:
If you want to go nuts, try to get your hands on cat 7. Cat 7a is rumored to handle 40G to 100Gbit/sec.

Probably doesn't hurt anything except the wallet, but I believe that will be overkill as well. Even if we had cheap 40G/100Gb networks in our homes (or from the Internet), what are we going to do with that bandwidth? Even if we go 8x the Blu-ray bandwidth for 4K, that's still not even 500Kb per stream. I could see some of us doing >1Gb (maybe 2.5Gb, maybe 10Gb) for crazy stuff in the house, but that would stil be pushing it.

The other consideration is that most Americans move within 7 years. Trying to plan for 10+ years out on this front, and you're likely doing it for the next guy...


Jeff
post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 
Good to know that HDMI 1.4 will handle 4k.
I think I'll run some Cat6, RG6 and empty conduit to a couple of places.
Cheers,
Tom
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