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New to DIY? FAQ's in here - Page 3

post #61 of 105
Wow, I hadn't looked at this FAQ in a while, and I must say it's looking mighty good! Congrats and thanks to Gorilla83 and all other contributors.

Here's something to add to the WinISD troubleshooting section:


Q: I'm running WinISD on Windows 7, and when I try to exit the program, I get the error message "Access violation at address 00000000. Read of address 00000000". I have to use Task Manager to shut it down.

A: Download the latest version at http://www.linearteam.org/download/winisd-07x.exe. This version is not linked from the Linear Team home page, but WinISD author Juha Hartikainen links to it from his Twitter account.
post #62 of 105
Very good thread Gorilla. I agree that it should be a sticky.
post #63 of 105
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by popalock View Post

Haven't seen this mentioned yet and it looks like it would fit nicely under the "wiring section" of your consolidated post.

Need an idea of the size of wire you need for your application?

Speaker Wire Size Selector Assistant

*Credit - This post by Bill Fitzmaurice.

Thanks PL - added the link to the wiring section.

Quote:
Originally Posted by filtor1 View Post

Today I went searching for threads about router bit selection. Is there any way, maybe under the router section, you could add recommendations for manufacturers of quality bits? I found several threads on the subject and thought it may another idea to add to an already very comprehensive FAQ page.

I've been meaning to elaborate in the woodworking section. The bit selection for each user will vary by how often they will use it, and of course their budget. At the lower end of the price spectrum, the MLCS bits (amazon has them) work very well. I've used many of my MLCS bits dozens of times without a single hiccup. Get 1/2 shank whenever possible - assuming your router supports them. If the bits will be used for more of a profession than a hobby, check out something by Freud. Woodcraft sells a great selection of very high quality bits as well.
Quote:
Originally Posted by rock_bottom View Post

Wow, I hadn't looked at this FAQ in a while, and I must say it's looking mighty good! Congrats and thanks to Gorilla83 and all other contributors.

Here's something to add to the WinISD troubleshooting section:


Q: I'm running WinISD on Windows 7, and when I try to exit the program, I get the error message "Access violation at address 00000000. Read of address 00000000". I have to use Task Manager to shut it down.

A: Download the latest version at http://www.linearteam.org/download/winisd-07x.exe. This version is not linked from the Linear Team home page, but WinISD author Juha Hartikainen links to it from his Twitter account.

Thanks - I wasn't aware of that new version so I'll be installing that myself. smile.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by A9X-308 View Post

Very good thread Gorilla. I agree that it should be a sticky.

Thank you sir - it's becoming more comprehensive each week thanks to the members here. cool.gif
Edited by Gorilla83 - 2/11/13 at 5:29am
post #64 of 105
Sticky !!!
post #65 of 105
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dstew100 View Post

Sticky !!!

Dave - You ready to enter into the DIY world yet? biggrin.gif
post #66 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtbdudex View Post

Bump - Mod sticky please, these get buried in the daily posts.....

mtbdudex, I reported your post to the moderators - never done that before. Under selections like "profanity" etc. I chose "other" and quickly also asked if they could make this thread a sticky, I hope enough other people do something similar because you are right, if any thread deserves to be a sticky it's this one.
post #67 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by carp View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by mtbdudex View Post

Bump - Mod sticky please, these get buried in the daily posts.....

mtbdudex, I reported your post to the moderators - never done that before. Under selections like "profanity" etc. I chose "other" and quickly also asked if they could make this thread a sticky, I hope enough other people do something similar because you are right, if any thread deserves to be a sticky it's this one.

Good idea - I just did the same for your post, with this comment to Mod for the reason "other" [edit] I deleted my original request post, as it's a stick now, will keep this on just for fun.
Quote:
Make sticky please ASAP

Edited by mtbdudex - 3/16/13 at 4:01pm
post #68 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtbdudex View Post

Bump - Mod sticky please, these get buried in the daily posts.....

I added it to my sig a few weeks ago because I got sick if waiting...lol

I think this quick tutorial should be added on installation of custom 12v triggers for amps.
post #69 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by popalock View Post

I added it to my sig a few weeks ago because I got sick if waiting...lol

I think this quick tutorial should be added on installation of custom 12v triggers for amps.

Austin, how do you add a thread to your signature. Obviously I've done it before but I forgot how and can't find it.
post #70 of 105
Thread Starter 
Looks like we made sticky status! Woohoo.

Austin - Thanks for the link. I add that as well as 'not's guide to building an external box. wink.gif

Also - thanks to those linking in their signatures to help spread the DIY spirit. smile.gif
post #71 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by carp View Post

Austin, how do you add a thread to your signature. Obviously I've done it before but I forgot how and can't find it.

Maybe, we should add this to the FAQ's...lol

Step 1: Click My Profile
Step 2: Locate 'Your Forum Signature
Step 3: Click on the "Edit Signature" hyperlink
Screen Shot for reference:


Once in your signature if you want to hyperlink to a specific thread here are the steps:

Step 1: Type in your text (i.e. - New to DIY? FAQ's in here)
Step 2: Highlight the text
Step 3: Click the "Link" button (located right next to the Italics button)
Step 4: Paste the thread url (i.e. - http://www.avsforum.com/t/1443078/new-to-diy-faqs-in-here/0_100)

Voilà!

Some may be wondering why the hell I just went through so much detail to post something most people probably already know about. Well, I was at a loss a few weeks ago because I hadn't updated my sig since before the AVS platform update. For some reason I simply could not figure out where I could edit my signature under my profile even though it was CLEARLY staring me directly in the face! I had to reach out to Andrew for assistance, so I figured if one person benefits from this, it's worth it.

biggrin.gif

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gorilla83 View Post

Looks like we made sticky status! Woohoo.
Much deserved!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gorilla83 View Post

Austin - Thanks for the link. I add that as well as 'not's guide to building an external box. wink.gif

Also - thanks to those linking in their signatures to help spread the DIY spirit. smile.gif

Awesome man. I'm going to keep it on my sig block anyway. Fall's inline with what I preach to the masses...
post #72 of 105
Clamps - I need a few more....., or can I get a Bessey strap clamp instead?
I've got an odd assortment of clamps, (2) 18" bar type, (4) 24" bar type, (2) 36" wood type, (2) 12" bar, plus c-clamps and hand clamps, see picture here;
(I've also got 2 pipe clamp's, those are on 6 ft pipes and heavy/bulky)
.


Has anyone tried and liked these Bessey strap clamps?
Seems ideal to grab 4 corners and squeeze the box/odd shape firmly together as glue dries, $30.
http://www.lowes.com/pd_186520-1073-VAS-23_0__?storeNumber=0779&Ntt=bessey+clamps&selectedLocalStoreBeanArray=%5Bcom.lowes.commerce.storelocator.beans.LocatorStoreBean%40227e227e%5D&pl=1&productId=1053233&ipTrail=205.144.100.200&currentURL=%3FNtt%3Dbessey%2Bclamps
Quote:
•Gentle clamping of miter joints, picture frames and endless odd-shaped projects
•Up to 260 lb (120 kg) of clamping force , 15' strap clamp opening: 23 ft (7 m)
•Tensile strength up to 1100 lb (500 kg) , Pulls evenly form both sides for distortion-free clamping
•Swivel pads on corner slips adjust automatically to any angle from 60 to 180 degrees , 23 ft (7 m) strap exerts constant pressure on each angle at every corner


[edit]
good articles I've found as needed during my build::
What is Fiberfill and how does it affect a subwoofer enclosure?

Now, some what I call "best practices" - things to think about - as I've read others build threads.
Best practice: "zip ties to keep the series connection wire from bouncin", from http://www.avsforum.com/t/1453468/stereo-integrity-18-d2-build-sealed#post_22860754


Also from same thread, simple DIY 90deg jig to keep holes square when drilling:


Best practice: Cover your fill with thin netting, from http://www.avsforum.com/t/1415823/2-dayton-titanic-mk-iii-15s-or-1-tc-sounds-lms-r-15/90#post_22583001


Best practice: "I used a 2" flush edge bit for the edges, bondo for the larger cracks, a blunder on my poor edging skills, and screw and nail holes. Then I shaped the edges with a 3/4" round-over bit on the outer edges and a 1/8" round-over for the edge that surrounds the driver.". from http://www.avsforum.com/t/1453468/stereo-integrity-18-d2-build-sealed#post_22860764


Best Practice: fastener to mount driver
http://www.avsforum.com/t/1464218/best-fastener-to-use-when-mounting-sub-drivers-to-mdf#post_23107456

Best Practice: Paint finishes
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtg90 View Post

I would use duratex only if I wanted the durability it offers or the texture/covering ability without needing primer.

My two 10cuft subs I just used some cheap black latex paint from Menards ($15 a gallon) and I think they turned out great. I put three coats on those two enclosures and used about 1/4 the gallon, though the finish is not nearly as durable as the duratex and I needed to use primer.

Primer: Zinsser FastPrime 2, Water Base Primer This stuff works great on MDF only needs one coat then sanding and its ready for paint.
Paint: Lucite Interior Acrylic Latex Satin Paint The guy in the paint department added three times the black pigment recommended as it is more of a dark gray normally.

I also like Rust-Oleum’s latex paint which seems more durable then the cheap latex but the largers size I have found it in is quarts. Rust-Oleum Painter's Touch Multi-Purpose Flat Black

Their oil based flat black is even better then the latex for durability but it is more of a mess to clean up. Rust-Oleum Professional High Performance-Flat Black Low VOC

One other I want to try is this stuff: Conco Interior Exterior Flat Acrylic Water Base Paint But my other black latex will last me a while.

Other on paint:
http://www.talkshopbot.com/forum/showpost.php?p=74323&postcount=6
http://www.avsforum.com/t/1465484/help-painting-finishing-one-of-erics-flatpacks#post_23136072

Best pratice: zip tie for easy remove heavy driver http://www.avsforum.com/t/1460745/ultimax-15-deal-of-the-day/30#post_23100837



How to extend the high pass filter below 20hz in DCX2496
http://www.avsforum.com/t/1461489/how-to-extend-the-high-pass-filter-below-20hz-in-dcx2496
Edited by mtbdudex - 4/27/13 at 4:17pm
post #73 of 105
I read on a guitar building FAQ this advice: (I'm paraphrasing) So many people plan and plan and plan their project to make sure they get everything just right. Planning is good, but know when to stop planning and just build it!
post #74 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by tuxedocivic View Post

I read on a guitar building FAQ this advice: (I'm paraphrasing) So many people plan and plan and plan their project to make sure they get everything just right. Planning is good, but know when to stop planning and just build it!

-1
post #75 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by popalock View Post

-1

frown.gif
post #76 of 105
I'm just getting started, so this is a perfect thread for me, thanks to all!
post #77 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by tuxedocivic View Post

frown.gif

You know I'm playing with you man...

smile.gif

Seriously though, I'm all for starting a build sooner than later, but NOTHING pisses me off more than having to make HD pit stops mid-build because I forgot this or that. Worse yet, HD doesn't carry a particular bit and I have to wait a few days for it to come via snail mail...

I'm in the excessive planning crowd because I want to make sure my build goes as smooth as possible.
post #78 of 105
Meh, doesn't bother me. I thought it was a pretty cool piece of advice, but if others don't think so, no big deal. There are a lot of noobs who pm me with questions for months, change their minds a hundred time, and never build anything. They need that push. You're probably not one of them.
post #79 of 105
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtbdudex View Post

Clamps - I need a few more....., or can I get a Bessey strap clamp instead?
I've got an odd assortment of clamps, (2) 18" bar type, (4) 24" bar type, (2) 36" wood type, (2) 12" bar, plus c-clamps and hand clamps, see picture here;
(I've also got 2 pipe clamp's, those are on 6 ft pipes and heavy/bulky)
.


Has anyone tried and liked these Bessey strap clamps?
Seems ideal to grab 4 corners and squeeze the box/odd shape firmly together as glue dries, $30.
http://www.lowes.com/pd_186520-1073-VAS-23_0__?storeNumber=0779&Ntt=bessey+clamps&selectedLocalStoreBeanArray=%5Bcom.lowes.commerce.storelocator.beans.LocatorStoreBean%40227e227e%5D&pl=1&productId=1053233&ipTrail=205.144.100.200&currentURL=%3FNtt%3Dbessey%2Bclamps


[edit]
good articles I've found as needed during my build::
What is Fiberfill and how does it affect a subwoofer enclosure?

Now, some what I call "best practices" - things to think about - as I've read others build threads.
Best practice: "zip ties to keep the series connection wire from bouncin", from http://www.avsforum.com/t/1453468/stereo-integrity-18-d2-build-sealed#post_22860754


Also from same thread, simple DIY 90deg jig to keep holes square when drilling:


Best practice: Cover your fill with thin netting, from http://www.avsforum.com/t/1415823/2-dayton-titanic-mk-iii-15s-or-1-tc-sounds-lms-r-15/90#post_22583001


Best practice: "I used a 2" flush edge bit for the edges, bondo for the larger cracks, a blunder on my poor edging skills, and screw and nail holes. Then I shaped the edges with a 3/4" round-over bit on the outer edges and a 1/8" round-over for the edge that surrounds the driver.". from http://www.avsforum.com/t/1453468/stereo-integrity-18-d2-build-sealed#post_22860764


Best Practice: fastener to mount driver
http://www.avsforum.com/t/1464218/best-fastener-to-use-when-mounting-sub-drivers-to-mdf#post_23107456

Best Practice: Paint finishes
Other on paint:
http://www.talkshopbot.com/forum/showpost.php?p=74323&postcount=6
http://www.avsforum.com/t/1465484/help-painting-finishing-one-of-erics-flatpacks#post_23136072

Best pratice: zip tie for easy remove heavy driver http://www.avsforum.com/t/1460745/ultimax-15-deal-of-the-day/30#post_23100837



How to extend the high pass filter below 20hz in DCX2496
http://www.avsforum.com/t/1461489/how-to-extend-the-high-pass-filter-below-20hz-in-dcx2496

Not sure how I missed these before but thanks for the contribution! I added a tips/best practices section.

I've also added some handy SPL calculators based on power input and room gain estimates as well as a wiring configuration calculator.
post #80 of 105
Couple of painting tips if painting gloss black...
If you are using MDF, you will have to seal the box using a sealing primer. Regular primer will just soak in the cut edges like a sponge. I have tried using Zinsser and Kilz and got very good results. There is a caveat.. If you are using a lacquer paint, you must use the solvent based primers, not the odor-free ones. The odor-free primers are water-based and tend to crack when lacquer is applied, found this out the hard way. You should spray primer on the entire box. After spraying, sand the box smooth with 220 grit paper. Repeat the process until there is no exposed MDF. Wait a few days before proceeding.

Another note: Do NOT apply lacquer on humid (>65%), cool (<65 degrees) or rainy days. The lacquer will absorb moisture and turn a milky white, this is called "blushing". If this happens, you will have to start all over. I found this out the hard way, AGAIN. Also, do NOT dry your project in the sun. It will cure too fast and cause issues.

I like to then spray three light coats of lacquer over the primer. Wait a couple of hours and repeat the process. The next day, wet-sand the finish lightly with 320-grit. Do NOT use dry paper. The lacquer will not be fully cured and chunks of the lacquer will adhere to the paper, causing mean gouges in the finish. I found this out the hard way. Reapply three thin coats, wait a couple of hours and reapply again. Again, wet-sand with 320-grit paper. Make sure you get rid of any orange peel. If you sand down to the primer, you will have to repeat the lacquer painting process.

You now have a choice to make. You can either spray on several coats of clear lacquer or leave the finish in the black. The clear lacquer will help protect the finish. But the finish of the black will be different with clear. Clear coated finishes will look like it is covered with saran wrap while a pure black finish will have a deep shine, which looks a lot better. The pure black finish is however, very susceptible to damage like scratches which will be easily visible. if you decide to go with the clear coat, apply it like the black lacquer.

FInally, you will need to spray the top coats. Apply three light coats of the clear or black lacquer and let it dry. Now comes the hard part. You will have to wait a month before you can finally finish it. Lacquer takes a while to cure. In cooler weather, it can take a while longer. If you use clear coat, it is imperative that you let it cure before polishing. if you polish the clear coat before it is cured, the heat from polishing will cloud the finish. Again, a lesson from me (I must have thirty coats of paint on my cabinet).

After the paint has cured, you can wet sand the finish with 600-grit, then 800-grit, on to 1000,1500 and if possible, 2000-grit. It's going to take a couple of hours for each level for a box. BTW, you will probably have to go to auto parts stores to find the finer grit paper. At this point, the paint will be super smooth and somewhat glossy. You will now have to use automotive scratch remove and then car polish to get rid of any remaining fine scratches. Then apply a glaze to bring out the gloss. After glazing, use car wax to seal the finish.

I found a nifty product to speed up the process. Woodcraft sells a Micro-Mesh sanding disc pack. It has several pads: 1000-12000 grit which can be used on your 5" random orbital sander. It really works great. You must use a backing pad with this product.

Another BIG tip for you all... When cutting MDF, always make the largest two panels about 1/4" larger than specified. Unless you have a table saw, it will not be unusual for the panels to be a bit "short" when assembled due to cutting inaccuracies. It is easier to trim excess than to make up for missing wood...
Edited by Jon S - 8/9/13 at 1:20pm
post #81 of 105
Jon S and company....link below has pics on this process...though a bit different here and there.

http://forums.shoryuken.com/discussion/67501/how-to-paint-mdf-to-a-mirror-finish-worklog
post #82 of 105
Thread Starter 
Added links to paint and finishing help in the original post. Thanks guys, keep them coming. Soon we'll have enough content for a book, LOL.
post #83 of 105
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gorilla83 View Post

Not sure how I missed these before but thanks for the contribution! I added a tips/best practices section.

I've also added some handy SPL calculators based on power input and room gain estimates as well as a wiring configuration calculator.

You were busy with your "Spring Speaker Shootout - April 2013" stuff biggrin.gif

I feel it is important to put links and visual to those best pratices here, will help others not repeat mistakes/lessons learned, and give more confidence to 1st timers to take the DIY plunge.

As I come across some more here/there I'll post them, and then you can group them in logical fashion in your Master Post.
post #84 of 105
Unless you know what you are doing, do NOT chamfer edges. Chamfer edges look nice but in practice it is difficult to finish nicely. If you do:

1. Chamfer all the vertical edges first. Then chamfer the horizontal edges... Otherwise the corners will be at different angles.
2. If applying veneer, apply it first to all the chamfered edges and corners. Trim all the excess with a router laminate trim bit. You will have to find a long bit for the overhang.
3. Apply veneer on the flat panels. Cut the panels to the exact dimensions and dry fit until it fits correctly. I do NOT recommend PSA (Peel & Stick Adhesive) veneer. Once you place it on, you cannot adjust it. I also have issues where the adhesive lifts from the veneer side causing bubbles which cannot be easily fixed.

Here is the problem. Doing angle cuts on the veneer to make perfect butted edges is not possible. You will have a rather large end grain edges on the veneer. With PSA and paper backed veneer, the backing will also show. When you stain the veneer, the paper backing will darken more than the veneer and leave a very noticeable corner band.
post #85 of 105
Figured out how to easily veneer chamfered cabinets. Or at least I think it will work better than my previous post as i have not tried it yet. Veneer the entire box BEFORE chamfering. When I chamfer a box, it removes about 7/8" of material from the edge of the box. When veneering, you just need to cover to about 3/4" or closer to the edge since the rest of the material closer to the edge of the box will be removed anyway. You must make sure that the veneer is bonded along the edge of the veneer really well to prevent fraying or chipping while chamfering.

Once the veneer is bonded to the surface, you can use a chamfer bit and route the edges (remember, when chamfering a box, you must chamfer all the vertical edges first, then the horizontal edges, otherwise the corners will be at different angles, I learned this the hard way).. If all goes well, the router will trim the veneer edges flush as you chamfer the box. This should be easier as you no longer need to trim the flat panels exactly to size. Now you just have to apply the veneer to the chamfered edges. You can overlap the edges a bit as well but not too much as the router will lift a bit on the overlapped edges. Then use a sufficiently long laminate trim bit (in this case, 1" since 7/8" was trimmed) to trim the chamfered veneer. Again, this should give you a clean cut. All you have to do from there is to apply veneer to the corners.

Couple of tips: I do not recommed that you use PSA veneer. The PSA is very thick and will leave a noticeable band between the veneer edges. Also, PSA tends to gum up the trim bits on the router because the glue is thick and does not really seem to dry (it actually looks like globs of thick rubber cement). If you stain light colored woods with a darker stain, the edges will become very dark and look like pinstripes on the finish. Its because the paper backing on the veneer absorbs the stain more than the veneer itself, becoming darker. Also, since you trim the veneer at 45 degrees, the area of the backingexposed is larger than veneer trimmed at 90 degrees.
post #86 of 105
post #87 of 105
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jon S View Post

Figured out how to easily veneer chamfered cabinets. Or at least I think it will work better than my previous post as i have not tried it yet. Veneer the entire box BEFORE chamfering. When I chamfer a box, it removes about 7/8" of material from the edge of the box. When veneering, you just need to cover to about 3/4" or closer to the edge since the rest of the material closer to the edge of the box will be removed anyway. You must make sure that the veneer is bonded along the edge of the veneer really well to prevent fraying or chipping while chamfering.

Once the veneer is bonded to the surface, you can use a chamfer bit and route the edges (remember, when chamfering a box, you must chamfer all the vertical edges first, then the horizontal edges, otherwise the corners will be at different angles, I learned this the hard way).. If all goes well, the router will trim the veneer edges flush as you chamfer the box. This should be easier as you no longer need to trim the flat panels exactly to size. Now you just have to apply the veneer to the chamfered edges. You can overlap the edges a bit as well but not too much as the router will lift a bit on the overlapped edges. Then use a sufficiently long laminate trim bit (in this case, 1" since 7/8" was trimmed) to trim the chamfered veneer. Again, this should give you a clean cut. All you have to do from there is to apply veneer to the corners.

Couple of tips: I do not recommed that you use PSA veneer. The PSA is very thick and will leave a noticeable band between the veneer edges. Also, PSA tends to gum up the trim bits on the router because the glue is thick and does not really seem to dry (it actually looks like globs of thick rubber cement). If you stain light colored woods with a darker stain, the edges will become very dark and look like pinstripes on the finish. Its because the paper backing on the veneer absorbs the stain more than the veneer itself, becoming darker. Also, since you trim the veneer at 45 degrees, the area of the backingexposed is larger than veneer trimmed at 90 degrees.

Thanks for sharing! One of these days I'll have to try that method.
post #88 of 105
I am looking at building a couple of subs and trying to determine what finish to use. We just refinished some cabinets with Rustoleum Cabinet Transformations and they turned out surprising great. Has anyone finished a MDF box with this product? If it would turn out like the cabinets I wold be very pleasd with the results. It may need a better clear seal coat for durability, although I am not sure. I may get a scrap piece of MDF and try it with the leftovers from the cabinet project.
post #89 of 105
Whenever you paint MDF, you must seal it with a shellac-based primer (e.g. Zinsser BIN)... MDF is notoriously difficult to work with. The cut edges absorbs paint like a sponge and never seems to seal. Using aerosol primers do NOT work well with MDF. Do not use primers that are odor-free as they are usually water-based. Spraying lacquers or enamels on them will cause the primer to wrinkle. Odor-free primers are designed to be used with latex paints.
post #90 of 105
If you are using Duratex you dont need to seal MDF but what Jon said is correct for pretty much every other type of finish
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