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Custom Glass Door Frame for A/V equipment closet

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
I just finished installing my first ever O/H projector (JVC X-30) in my small (22'x20') home theatre onto a 135" 2.35 Vutec screen. And I love it!! I cannot believe that I waited so long.

But now I want to modify my A/V equipment closet so I can access the wiring from the rear, so I would like to have an operable dark glass door made approximately 19" wide x 60" high that I will mount in the end wall of my equipment closet.

Any ideas of where I might find something like this? I emailed a local shower door company as that is the only idea I have where to start.

Thanks for any help, Eric.
post #2 of 6
I'd recommend hinge hardware like this for five bucks


Another good hinge option here for eight or nine bucks


And here's your latch hardware


And a steel pull for the glass


Call your local glass shops and ask for the following:
  • Gray tempered glass 1/4" thick [ask for "graylite 14" if you want it really dark]
  • Give them the size (round up to the even inch for pricing)
  • Tell them you want it without a logo (standard is to have a logo etched into the glass to certify that it meets safety code)
  • Tell them you want the edges "flat polished"
  • They may try to sell you laminated or "float". Insist on tempered for strength.

The glass shouldn't cost more than $75 to $100
Edited by petew - 12/4/12 at 7:02pm
post #3 of 6
Many local glass shops do not do tempered glass themselves and have to order it.

Cut out the middle man and order your tempered tinted glass door from www.onedayglass.com/

I did and couldn't be happier. Service was prompt and more importantly, they got the dimensions right the first time. This iscritical because once tempered, you can't cut the glass afterwards.

I'm not affiliated with www.onedayglass.com/. Just a happy customer that wants to share withe forum.
post #4 of 6
A tempered glass plant is a $5 million + investment. They rarely if ever sell retail.

I did a quick scan of onedayglass and this popped up front and center:
What are tong marks?
We have a very unique vertical tempering furnace. This type of furnace allows us to temper pieces as small as 1" x 1" in any glass that is 3/16" or thicker- glass that other glass tempering companies won't even touch! In a vertical tempering furnace, glass is hung vertically by tongs and run through the chambers of the furnace. Also, since we have our own furnace we're working on most pieces from start to finish entirely in-house. Not waiting for someone else to do the work means we can get your order out the door very quickly. This style of tempering does result in the glass having small tong marks or indentations left from the tongs the glass was hung from. These "dimples" are not imperfections and in no way do they compromise the integrity of the glass. The glass is 100% fully tempered- the marks actually prove that the glass was in the furnace!


YIKES! Vertical tempering plants went out with the Reagan Administration! Modern plants use horizontal ovens that leave very little distortion in the glass. They are limited to sizes larger than a foot or so on one dimension.



Glass tempered in a vertical oven is probably fine if it's installed in some sort of frame or sash that covers enough of the edge to hide the tong marks. But if low distortion and clean surfaces are needed (as on frameless doors) you really do need to buy glass processed in a modern plant.
post #5 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by petew View Post

A tempered glass plant is a $5 million + investment. They rarely if ever sell retail.

I did a quick scan of onedayglass and this popped up front and center:
What are tong marks?
We have a very unique vertical tempering furnace. This type of furnace allows us to temper pieces as small as 1" x 1" in any glass that is 3/16" or thicker- glass that other glass tempering companies won't even touch! In a vertical tempering furnace, glass is hung vertically by tongs and run through the chambers of the furnace. Also, since we have our own furnace we're working on most pieces from start to finish entirely in-house. Not waiting for someone else to do the work means we can get your order out the door very quickly. This style of tempering does result in the glass having small tong marks or indentations left from the tongs the glass was hung from. These "dimples" are not imperfections and in no way do they compromise the integrity of the glass. The glass is 100% fully tempered- the marks actually prove that the glass was in the furnace!

YIKES! Vertical tempering plants went out with the Reagan Administration! Modern plants use horizontal ovens that leave very little distortion in the glass. They are limited to sizes larger than a foot or so on one dimension.

Glass tempered in a vertical oven is probably fine if it's installed in some sort of frame or sash that covers enough of the edge to hide the tong marks. But if low distortion and clean surfaces are needed (as on frameless doors) you really do need to buy glass processed in a modern plant.

Try these local guys:
http://dottoglass.com
post #6 of 6
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chas821 View Post

Many local glass shops do not do tempered glass themselves and have to order it.
Cut out the middle man and order your tempered tinted glass door from www.onedayglass.com/ I did and couldn't be happier. ...

The glass and hardware are really not the problem, I have an online supplier that is just North of me that I have used on past projects.

I was just hoping that I did not have to build my own frame, I thought that there might be someone out there in internet land that I could just order it all as an assembly. One that I could give the RO and front reveal that I want and they could pop it out.

I can have my steel guy make the frame, then have it powerder coated and order the glass from my guy. I was just hoping to skip a few steps.

Thanks for the help, Eric.
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