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Netflix 3D Streaming is live - Page 8

post #211 of 321
Quote:
Originally Posted by tingham View Post

As I have posted before, during the day everything works fine with Netflix, but I'm convinced that Neflix is at fault and their HD and 3D streaming cannot support their customer base fully during prime time, for whatever reason. Their service has been very bad for me during prime time, especially in the last month or so. I remember when they 1st supported Super HD for all and it worked great during prime time at 1st. I never see it now during prime time and it's been that way for a month or so. They screwed something up.

3D streaming is unwatchable with constant buffering. Supposed HD streaming of movies and shows at 480SD or 480P for long periods during prime time viewing. It's becoming so frustrating for me to watch that I might cancel my subscription until these issues are fixed...3D or not. I have a family, and work during the day so most of the time I'm watching in the evenings.

Maybe many people just don't notice the pic quality issues during prime time, since they have smaller tv's or no hd at all? On my 60" plasma it's not looking pretty. If they can't provide the service I'm paying for it makes no sense for me to continue using it. All the other services I use work fine day or night, Amazon prime, Vudu,..etc.

I think it also depends on where you are at. I watched a couple of hours of Netflix last night. Now while it didn't stay on the same encode, it did stay with the 1080P encodes. So from my Roamio Pro I kept seeing the info screen switch back and forth from 1080 HD to 1080 Super HD for the couple hours of Netflix I watched last night.

Although this afternoon I watched some content and I saw 720P show up a few times, but at least it was still mostly 1080P encodes.

EDIT: redface.gif I didn't realize this was the 3D thread. I wasn't watching any 3D content. Just 2D content.
post #212 of 321
Quote:
Originally Posted by extech View Post


How is the audio (assuming you are going thru a avr) on the hbo or starz on demand 3d? Are they free or do you have to pay for them?

I do go through an AVR and I believe everything on HBO is 5.1, but I will specifically check a few of the 3D movies and make sure its true. We streamed Jack the Giant Slayer last week in 3D and it was definitely 5.1. The overall quality was surprisingly good considering its SBS 3D. Flawless streaming is nice. No buffering, no resolution drop. Good depth with limited pop out. Pretty entertaining movie too.

HBO On Demand is only available on some providers. 3D HBO is limited to certain providers too. I can't speak for every provider, but on Comcast Xfinity HBO On demand is free as long as you have HBO. When I had Verizon Fios HBO On demand was free with HBO subscription too, but I didn't have 3D then, so I'm not sure if they offer 3D HBO On Demand. I would guess they do. Same thing for Starz.

Short answer is no, its not free, but many people already have HBO or Starz so, its relatively free to them. I would pay for HBO over Netflix any day. Since Netflix 3D is useless for me I'm considering cancelling it. The only thing staying my hand is we stream a lot of old TV shows through it.
post #213 of 321

I use a PS3 hardlined to my Comcast modem to stream Netflix. 3D content constantly needs to buffer nearly every minute and is unwatchable because of this. Netflix says it's Comcast's problem. My internet is working well and the speeds are good, so Comcast says it's Netflix's problem. I've never had a Netflix customer rep have any clue about how 3D televisions even work. They politely drive me insane just reading whatever canned response is on their screen. "Are you sure you have a 3D television?" is the most common question I get when I call. Supervisors have been better and ususally have a decent idea about the technology.

 

I called Netflix again this past weekend and was told they believe there is a problem with the PS3 app and to contact Sony because "they have nothing to do with the PS3 app programming and maintenance", which didn't make sense, but I called Sony Playstation customer service.

 

Sony's customer service was surprisingly fantastic. The rep was just a normal guy who knew exactly what I was talking about and was very familiar with 3D tech. He said they were unaware of any issue with the Netflix app, but had me uninstall and reinstall the app anyway, which didn't fix the issue. He suggested I contact Netflix and suggest they address the possible app issue. I told him what Netflix said about not being involved with the app creation and he just laughed.

 

To sum up, it looks like Netflix 3D content will continue to have that buffering issue until their team acknowledges the problem and takes steps to fix it. I will not be calling Netflix about this anymore. It's just too frustrating.

post #214 of 321
You should try Vudu for 3D content. I never had a problem with buffering on my PS3 while streaming HDX content, and if I recall correctly you can even download the titles you buy to the PS3's HDD.
post #215 of 321
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rudy1 View Post

You should try Vudu for 3D content. I never had a problem with buffering on my PS3 while streaming HDX content, and if I recall correctly you can even download the titles you buy to the PS3's HDD.

Thanks for the tip. I'm glad I discovered this forum.

post #216 of 321
Quote:
Originally Posted by aaronwt View Post

I think it also depends on where you are at. I watched a couple of hours of Netflix last night. Now while it didn't stay on the same encode, it did stay with the 1080P encodes. So from my Roamio Pro I kept seeing the info screen switch back and forth from 1080 HD to 1080 Super HD for the couple hours of Netflix I watched last night.

Although this afternoon I watched some content and I saw 720P show up a few times, but at least it was still mostly 1080P encodes.

EDIT: redface.gif I didn't realize this was the 3D thread. I wasn't watching any 3D content. Just 2D content.

It could depend on your location aaronwt. From what I can tell with the Netflix app and the stream quality check is there are 3 servers for streaming. I have friends that live all over the country and when I ask them if their Netflix quality has been bad lately they state that it is at 1st, but clears up within a couple minutes. None of my friends have 3D so they are speaking of 2D only.
.
We have all had buffering problems with 3D content, but it has gravitated to lousy encodes with 2D content for me lately at night, during prime time viewing ONLY, when their servers get hammered. All programming works fine for me during the day. Great encodes and great 3D.



Quote:
Originally Posted by revunit001 View Post

I use a PS3 hardlined to my Comcast modem to stream Netflix. 3D content constantly needs to buffer nearly every minute and is unwatchable because of this. Netflix says it's Comcast's problem. My internet is working well and the speeds are good, so Comcast says it's Netflix's problem. I've never had a Netflix customer rep have any clue about how 3D televisions even work. They politely drive me insane just reading whatever canned response is on their screen. "Are you sure you have a 3D television?" is the most common question I get when I call. Supervisors have been better and ususally have a decent idea about the technology.

I called Netflix again this past weekend and was told they believe there is a problem with the PS3 app and to contact Sony because "they have nothing to do with the PS3 app programming and maintenance", which didn't make sense, but I called Sony Playstation customer service.

Sony's customer service was surprisingly fantastic. The rep was just a normal guy who knew exactly what I was talking about and was very familiar with 3D tech. He said they were unaware of any issue with the Netflix app, but had me uninstall and reinstall the app anyway, which didn't fix the issue. He suggested I contact Netflix and suggest they address the possible app issue. I told him what Netflix said about not being involved with the app creation and he just laughed.

To sum up, it looks like Netflix 3D content will continue to have that buffering issue until their team acknowledges the problem and takes steps to fix it. I will not be calling Netflix about this anymore. It's just too frustrating.

Asking these service providers what could be causing these 3D streaming issues is frustrating, as you know, since you can't get a clear answer from them.

I've come to the conclusion that Netflix is at fault. Because, every other streaming service I use, which is 4 to 5 services, have no problems streaming content to my home as advertised, at ALL times of the day. I think their servers are underpowered and they don't want to spend the money for the upgrades needed to improve them. They have 40 million customers and others that are piggybacking from some of those They got too big for their britches.

Does your 3D streaming buffer during daytime viewing?
post #217 of 321

Though most of my attempts to stream 3D on Netflix have been in the evening, I have tried during the day wit similar results. Instead of buffering every minute, it might be every five minutes. Still unwatchable. I live in Boston and the 3D and Super HD availability is new to my area. Picture quality fluctuates often for 2D content as well.

post #218 of 321
Quote:
Originally Posted by tingham View Post

I've come to the conclusion that Netflix is at fault. Because, every other streaming service I use, which is 4 to 5 services, have no problems streaming content to my home as advertised, at ALL times of the day. I think their servers are underpowered and they don't want to spend the money for the upgrades needed to improve them. They have 40 million customers and others that are piggybacking from some of those They got too big for their britches.

Yup. Its financials are such that they have to generate more and more revenue to pay for the poor content deals Hastings made. My guess is that Netflix doesn't have any spare cash to maintain (or keep up with) the demand from existing US customers. Its eyes (and money) is focused on expanding the market, i.e., South America, Europe, to get that revenue streams that it needs.
post #219 of 321
From what others have posted in other foras:

http://gigaom.com/2014/01/06/netflix-4k-ultra-hd-3d/

Enjoy Netflix 3D while you can. mad.gif
post #220 of 321
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apostate View Post

From what others have posted in other foras:

http://gigaom.com/2014/01/06/netflix-4k-ultra-hd-3d/

Enjoy Netflix 3D while you can. mad.gif

I'm not sure how they can gauge interest when they have yet to provide a functional product. It's called prime time because that's when the majority of people like to watch TV.

Netflix makes us sacrifice selection with their half-assed streaming offerings now we can only watch the limited selection at inconvenient times?

Netflix better show me something soon or I'm moving on. Shoddy 4K that's streams at 120P for the 1% of the population with 100mps internet from only Netflix's most favoritest cable providers . . .
post #221 of 321
Interesting that a correction had to be published when another negative Nancy comment that Netflix was going to dump 3D proved to be another false statement. In fact, Netflix will not end 3D but will keep it in that special genre similar to 7.1 audio and other sparingly popular formats.

Why do a few people make it their mission in life to trash this format? Are they blind in one eye and just jealous of those who enjoy seeing 3 dimensions.

While it is true that the focus in the industry remains 2D content and displays, moving more and more into higher quality 4K, 3D is certainly not dead. The most exciting news for 3D at CES2014 is the coming of age for glasses free high quality displays now with two competing technologies coming to market.
post #222 of 321
Now that I think about it, I don't think I've ever watched Netflix 3D during prime time. It's typically more of a Saturday-afternoon kind of thing. Normal HD/Super-HD stuff streams fine regardless of time.
post #223 of 321
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apostate View Post

From what others have posted in other foras:

http://gigaom.com/2014/01/06/netflix-4k-ultra-hd-3d/

Enjoy Netflix 3D while you can. mad.gif
Quote:
”We have no plans to discontinue 3D, we have some new titles coming online in the future, but we are devoting all budget and energy on higher quality content towards 4K and future color and frame rate enhancements,” he said

it doesn't sound like 3D is going anywhere yet on Netflix.

I have watched a bunch of 3D content from Netflix, but most of my 3D watching comes from 3D Blu-ray Disc rentals from 3DBlurayrental. So as long as 3D content is still produced on Blu-ray Disc, I will be happy.
post #224 of 321
Quote:
Originally Posted by aaronwt View Post


it doesn't sound like 3D is going anywhere yet on Netflix.

I have watched a bunch of 3D content from Netflix, but most of my 3D watching comes from 3D Blu-ray Disc rentals from 3DBlurayrental. So as long as 3D content is still produced on Blu-ray Disc, I will be happy.

Nice! biggrin.gif Now if I only can get Netflix 3D without buffering every five minutes. mad.gif
post #225 of 321
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apostate View Post

Nice! biggrin.gif Now if I only can get Netflix 3D without buffering every five minutes. mad.gif

I usually have the buffer PI roblem too when viewing in prime time but after midnight, all the programs they offer buffer for a minute or two in the beginning and then play straight through.
post #226 of 321
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apostate View Post

Nice! biggrin.gif Now if I only can get Netflix 3D without buffering every five minutes. mad.gif

It's too bad Vizio is pulling 3D from their new line of TVs, since Vizio is the only place you can stream 3DGO! currently. According to this article 3DGO! can stream high-quality 3D at half the bandwidth of Netflix.

http://www.soundandvision.com/content/sensio-3dgo-gives-3d-tv-owners-rental-options

"Sensio uses a patented process of spatial compression technology and an adaptive bit-rate to deliver the content, varying between 4, 6, and 9 Mbps depending on the Internet connection. They explained that in comparison, Netflix uses 5 Mbps for HD, 7 Mbps for Super HD and 12 Mbps for 3D quality.

Both the regular and 3D picture quality on the Despicable Me 2 and John Carter demos I viewed was terrific with no noticeable artifacts or streaming issues and lots of depth and presence to the image. Brightness was also quite good and I never felt like I was watching a compressed image. The image never suffered from any of the softness or motion issues that other HD streaming seems to suffer from. The reps were also eager to point out that the hotel’s Internet service was limited to 6 Mbps, so I was only viewing the mid-quality level.

The 3DGO! app is already available on Vizio TVs and Sensio just announced a deal to add the service to Panasonic sets sometime this spring. The service will be backwards compatible to all Panasonic 3D TVs dating back to 2011. Sensio claims it has delivered around 8,000 3D rentals so far."
post #227 of 321
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnny905 View Post

It's too bad Vizio is pulling 3D from their new line of TVs...

Not me. biggrin.gif I am excited about Ultra D, glasses-free 3D TV. Our own ayatollah of 3D fora, Don Landis, gave his two thumbs up. I can't wait it to see it in action in real life. smile.gif
post #228 of 321
Quote:
Originally Posted by Apostate View Post

Not me. biggrin.gif I am excited about Ultra D, glasses-free 3D TV. Our own ayatollah of 3D fora, Don Landis, gave his two thumbs up. I can't wait it to see it in action in real life. smile.gif

And excited is all you can expect to be for the next several years in real-life, while Passive 3D users can be excited now. (The glasses are so light as to be forgotten while watching.) While UltraD may look ok, all the rest of the glasses-free stereoscopic displays all suffered SUCH incredible distortion and artifacting that they were all but unwatchable and had an incredibly narrow viewing “sweet spot.” Practical use for home-theater is obviously years away. Lost the link but here are some comments from CES.

SHARP:
I constantly felt like the image was rippling and rolling in waves, especially if you moved your head or shifted from side to side. A Gizmodo reviewer wrote, “As you go from a dead center viewing perspective to a wider and wider angle it looks worse and worse. I would argue that Sharp’s prototype barely has a viewing angle. The 3D effect barely works. It just kind of looks like the TV is broken.” The benefit of 8K was totally lost as the image didn’t seem to have even the sharpness and detail of 1080p. Sharp ran a loop of clips from “Frozen” and “Life of Pi.”

SAMSUNG
The Samsung set was smaller—around 55 inches—than the sharp and “only” used 4K technology. However, you’d have had no idea that it was 4K as the images lacked any real sharpness and detail and certainly paled next to every other 4K set at CES. The set definitely has a 3D effect, adding depth and dimension and being able to break the screen plane with objects that extended out into the room. However the set exhibited the same rippling and waviness to the image that I noticed from the Sharp TV, and it also had a shimmering-grain to it as well. In fact, it was actually hard on the eyes to watch for very long. Also, the rep said I was a little tall for the display and had me duck down to be at eye level with the display. Apparently even though it was a 4K set, it was actually showing 720p footage. Also, all of the demo material that I saw—some clips of whitewater rafting and people having a food fight—was presented in slow-mo which makes me think that the set might have difficulty with motion.

HiSENSE
This Chinese company has been making a real splash in the TV world recently, and its booth was certainly jam-packed with all the latest buzzword technologies including OLED, curved OLED, and plenty of 4K. Like the other sets, the 55-inch device on which HiSense demonstrated glasses-free 3D definitely had added depth and dimension, but it still suffered from the rippling, warping of images across the screen and that textural quality. It also seemed really prone to needed to be located in a narrow sweet spot as I heard various people proclaiming, “I can’t see it. Oh. Wait. There it is.”

IZON
IZON held a press conference last Monday, which was really more of a technical preview of their technology than an actual press event. The demo included a 20-inch TV with IZON tech on board and a Blu-ray player displaying a 3D copy of “Man of Steel,” the latest Superman movie. IZON claimed that it is able to use its tech for real-time 3D gaming, but an issue with the PlayStation on hand prevented them from demonstrating it. Ideal viewing range to experience the 3D effect on the 20-inch panel is three to four feet, and really requires the viewer to be at level with the screen for best results. While there was definitely enhanced depth to the image, it also had a very grainy, lenticular quality to me, reminding me of those old 3D postcards. There was a lot of distortion in the image and both the image and 3D quality were definitely affected by moving my head in any direction
post #229 of 321
Quote:
Originally Posted by cinema13 View Post

And excited is all you can expect to be for the next several years in real-life, while Passive 3D users can be excited now. (The glasses are so light as to be forgotten while watching.) While UltraD may look ok, all the rest of the glasses-free stereoscopic displays all suffered SUCH incredible distortion and artifacting that they were all but unwatchable and had an incredibly narrow viewing “sweet spot.” Practical use for home-theater is obviously years away.

That's okay. It will give me time to save up and one of my six TVs (including 2 3D TVs) to go belly up (hopefully) and give me a reason to buy. I didn't mention nor am interested in other glasses-free technology that you've noted since we probably read the same articles and none seem to be ready. Only Ultra D seems to be ready for prime time, hence my specific mention of Ultra D. Also if you've read the same articles, you'd know that Ultra D is suppose to come to market sometime this year. We'll see, of course. wink.gif
post #230 of 321
I was told Croods is available in 3d on Netflix streaming........true?
post #231 of 321
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toe View Post

I was told Croods is available in 3d on Netflix streaming........true?

Yep it's there...just checked. Can't get anything to stream without buffering and locking my player up but that's another matter. I'm glad though that new titles are appearing.
post #232 of 321
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cla55clown View Post

Yep it's there...just checked. Can't get anything to stream without buffering and locking my player up but that's another matter. I'm glad though that new titles are appearing.

Under those circumstances I can't see what difference it makes what titles are available.confused.gif

Just sayin'......

Ed
post #233 of 321
As someone who has been a vocal critic of Netflix lately, I just wanted to say I watched the grand Canyon flick in 3D on Netflix and found it to be a great experience. The quality of the image and 3D were great. It only buffered a few times. Granted I didn't watch during prime time as its an exercise in patience, but I thought it was only fair to give credit where credit is due.

The Croods is great news, it's a feature film with a widespread audience. It might be the only 3D movie offered on Netflix that my wife would watch with me. Now if I only I can get her to watch outside of prime time, we'll have a winner.
post #234 of 321
Quote:
Originally Posted by old corps View Post

Under those circumstances I can't see what difference it makes what titles are available.confused.gif

Just sayin'......

Ed

It makes a difference because as they add more main stream/popular titles like this it draws more people to experience it. This then forces Netflix to fix/upgrade their server side and makes 3D streaming better for everyone. My internet speeds are fine everywhere else in the house and I am not the only one having buffering issues. I'm a big fan of the 3D genre and hope to see it continue development and gain a wider audience and thus improved services.
post #235 of 321
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cla55clown View Post

It makes a difference because as they add more main stream/popular titles like this it draws more people to experience it. This then forces Netflix to fix/upgrade their server side and makes 3D streaming better for everyone. My internet speeds are fine everywhere else in the house and I am not the only one having buffering issues. I'm a big fan of the 3D genre and hope to see it continue development and gain a wider audience and thus improved services.

I see your point and hopefully Netflix will follow suit. Unfortunately, I've got 2 "smart" 3d bluray players and 3 Rokus and none of them offer ANY 3d on Netflix. I'm a big fan as well with a 73" 3d capable TV and a 3d projector shooting onto a 120" screen. wink.gif

Ed
post #236 of 321
Comcast, yesterday announced a deal just signed with Netflix that will permit Netflix to connect their new high bandwidth content directly to Comcast, bypassing a third party. This is expected to eliminate the recent problems Comcast customers are having with buffering. I have no information on when this will be in place but the first step now has been completed to enable 4K and 3D high bandwidth delivery to Comcast customers.

Last evening I tried to watch a few Netflix 3D programs. Some would play fine and others were said to not be currently available because my network is not fast enough. But one I have been waiting to see was a surfing Movie on Tahiti. For the first time, last night that movie played with no buffering. I wonder if Netflix is rotating availability on these 3D shows.
post #237 of 321
I just got a new 60" Sony WI-FI TV that has 3D and has a Netflix app built-in; it even has a remote control button to go direct to Netflix.

I tried to see the Grand Canyon Adventure, and it said the network was too slow for 3D.

I had the same problem with most of the other 3D titles on there, but was able to watch one; an african elephant documentary.

It played through with almost no rebuffering.

I have Time Warner cable, and a speed test of the wi-fi connection using a laptop showed a 15 meg download speed. so that is not the problem. They say you need 12.

Netflix says that my TV's wi-fi receiver is probably the fault; not as good as the one in the laptop. I think that is a bunch of crap.

I wish I could hardwire my router to the TV to check and see if that works better, but there is no way to do that easily. I could run a long cat 5 cable temporarily just for a test; maybe I will.

Oddly enough, the Grand Canyon program disappeared from the choices that come up on the TV screen. The rest are all still there.
Edited by commsysman - 2/25/14 at 3:01pm
post #238 of 321
Quote:
I have Time Warner cable, and a speed test of the wi-fi connection using a laptop showed a 15 meg download speed. so that is not the problem. They say you need 12.

Actually that IS part of your problem. It has been known for quite some time that Netflix content is streamed via 3rd party to your ISP which can throttle the streaming content to below what you need to see 3D. Recently this was confirmed by a deal Netflix made with Comcast where Netflix will pay for Comcast to connect to Netflix direct and not throttle back it's streaming media. Most likely Netflix will be looking to make a deal with all the ISP's that are inhibiting people from full speed streaming media. Over the next few weeks Comcast subscribers should start to see improvement.

You also mentioned using wifi. This also may be a source of not achieving the 15Mbs but your idea to test it with a long Cat 5 cable is what I would do. I had trouble with a Vizio doing Vudu here via wifi so I ran the cable and that solved the problem with Vudu.

I have a 20 Mbs Comcast and there are many 3D Netflix programs that buffer here as well. I am looking forward to soon having my Comcast no longer throttling here. My system is a PS3 with cat 5 wired connection.

Soon these issues will be over. Netflix is aware and is doing what it can to get ISP's up to speed to make the weak links in the delivery go away.
post #239 of 321
Quote:
Originally Posted by commsysman View Post

I just got a new 60" Sony WI-FI TV that has 3D and has a Netflix app built-in; it even has a remote control button to go direct to Netflix.

I tried to see the Grand Canyon Adventure, and it said the network was too slow for 3D.

I had the same problem with most of the other 3D titles on there, but was able to watch one; an african elephant documentary.

It played through with almost no rebuffering.

I have Time Warner cable, and a speed test of the wi-fi connection using a laptop showed a 15 meg download speed. so that is not the problem. They say you need 12.

Netflix says that my TV's wi-fi receiver is probably the fault; not as good as the one in the laptop. I think that is a bunch of crap.

I wish I could hardwire my router to the TV to check and see if that works better, but there is no way to do that easily. I could run a long cat 5 cable temporarily just for a test; maybe I will.

Oddly enough, the Grand Canyon program disappeared from the choices that come up on the TV screen. The rest are all still there.

http://www.amazon.com/NETGEAR-Powerline-200Mbps-Nano-Adapter/dp/B006OOKT3Y/ref=sr_1_9?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1393470550&sr=1-9&keywords=home+plugs+ethernet

Get a set of power line adapters like these.wink.gif

Ed
post #240 of 321
Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Landis View Post

It has been known for quite some time that Netflix content is streamed via 3rd party to your ISP which can throttle the streaming content to below what you need to see 3D. Recently this was confirmed by a deal Netflix made with Comcast where Netflix will pay for Comcast to connect to Netflix direct and not throttle back it's streaming media. Most likely Netflix will be looking to make a deal with all the ISP's that are inhibiting people from full speed streaming media. Over the next few weeks Comcast subscribers should start to see improvement.

You are mistaken. There is no throttling: only congested, overwhelmed network connections between Netflix CDNs and ISPs which could have been mitigated by Netflix but didn't choose to do so. You are also mistaken about the nature of agreement between Comcast and Netflix. You make it sound as if Comcast strong-armed Netflix into paying some extortion money. This is a mutually beneficial deal for both Comcast and Netflix. Comcast gets the transit fee that Netflix has been paying Cogent. Netflix gets to phase out its usage (and reliance) on 3rd party CDNs and put in place wider implementation of its own Open Connect CDN which will result in cost saving for Netflix. Netflix also gets bigger conduit in Comcast to propagate its contents. It's a win-win for both sides.
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