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Dual GJALLARHORNs! - Page 8

post #211 of 758
Quote:
Originally Posted by lukeamdman View Post

Yep, i'm using pocket screws (Kreg system) and butt joints. That and a large quantity of PL400, of course!

Bam! That is what I would do building a pair at home as well.
post #212 of 758
More pix !!!!!!!!!!!!!


I hope the build is progressing with few issues.
post #213 of 758
Thread Starter 
Just finished putting this together. I wish I had one of these a long time ago!

post #214 of 758
That's got to help tremendously! smile.gif
post #215 of 758
On a side note my Inuke 6000 pooped the bed on me tonight driving stereo GH's. Only had it about 2 months. Keyboard player hit a loud tone during rehearsal and it tripped the breaker which has never happened before in the 3 years we have been in that space after which the inuke is a flatline. Everything else on that line is fine. I believe something happened in the inuke and that is what tripped the breaker not the other way around. Anyway I can't really give a strong recommendation for the inukes at least for powering these based on this performance.
post #216 of 758
I got that same saw, I love the hell out it. Came from a 35 year old craftmens to that rigid, what a difference.
post #217 of 758
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ricci View Post

On a side note my Inuke 6000 pooped the bed on me tonight driving stereo GH's. Only had it about 2 months. Keyboard player hit a loud tone during rehearsal and it tripped the breaker which has never happened before in the 3 years we have been in that space after which the inuke is a flatline. Everything else on that line is fine. I believe something happened in the inuke and that is what tripped the breaker not the other way around. Anyway I can't really give a strong recommendation for the inukes at least for powering these based on this performance.
Ricci what are you suggesting for an amp for a pair of these horns? Peavey IPR3000 for budget and Crest 9200, QSC PL380 or so for more money?
post #218 of 758
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ricci View Post

On a side note my Inuke 6000 pooped the bed on me tonight driving stereo GH's.

Bummer man!

I hope you can get it repaired under warranty and with little hassle.
Have a backup?
post #219 of 758
Yeah I am just going to put a Crest 8002 back in. It never had any problems. I am under warranty but I believe I tossed the packaging...and probably the warranty card for the inuke DOH!!!

I can't really recommend the inuke for these based on my personal experience. A shame cause the dsp built in and price was right.
post #220 of 758
At least you have a backup!
I always keep one offline but in the rack so I can do the switch if necessary.

I am a fan of simple and separate components too. I try to avoid having additional electronics built into things like amps, etc. I go old school with Crown CE-4000s and the DCX, that way you don't loose more than one capability at the same time, ala EQ'ing and amplification.

I am not knocking having DSP in an amp and I am sure there are very good amps with that capability, but I don't want to spend thousands on an amp.

MY CEs run no matter what I throw at them. I am running the one 1ohm stereo and it never clips, shuts down or complains and I have had it for 5 years and it was already used!
post #221 of 758
Quote:
Originally Posted by lukeamdman View Post

Just finished putting this together. I wish I had one of these a long time ago!

Nice saw! I'm going to buy a table saw this time round since I have six large bass horns and 4 large subs to build. How big is the fence on that Rigdig - i.e. what the biggest size panel that it can cut?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ricci View Post

On a side note my Inuke 6000 pooped the bed on me tonight driving stereo GH's. Only had it about 2 months. Keyboard player hit a loud tone during rehearsal and it tripped the breaker which has never happened before in the 3 years we have been in that space after which the inuke is a flatline. Everything else on that line is fine. I believe something happened in the inuke and that is what tripped the breaker not the other way around. Anyway I can't really give a strong recommendation for the inukes at least for powering these based on this performance.

Bummer. Did you buy it on-line? If so maybe you have a record of sale in you emails.
post #222 of 758
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by steve71 View Post

Nice saw! I'm going to buy a table saw this time round since I have six large bass horns and 4 large subs to build. How big is the fence on that Rigdig - i.e. what the biggest size panel that it can cut?
Bummer. Did you buy it on-line? If so maybe you have a record of sale in you emails.

It will rip up to 30" on the right side.

For the 45" x 45" pieces, I used a circular saw and a straight edge. Worked like a charm.
post #223 of 758
Quote:
Originally Posted by lukeamdman View Post

It will rip up to 30" on the right side.

For the 45" x 45" pieces, I used a circular saw and a straight edge. Worked like a charm.

30" is pretty reasonable. Everything I've built so far has been with the straight edge and circular saw. Like you said, it works great - just a little slower.
post #224 of 758
So, how long until we fire these bad boys up?
post #225 of 758
Thread Starter 
I note about page 4 on the PDF. There's one measurement that's measured from the inside of the 3/4" wall that was throwing things off because I didn't notice it.



I knew something was wrong because the 16.370" measurement I highlighted was off for me, and the angle just didn't look right.

I recommend using page 5 instead, since all the measurements , including the one-off above, are measured from the outside of the walls.
post #226 of 758
Good catch!

That could definitely throw the builder off.
post #227 of 758
Sorry...there are probably a few errors in there. I probably put too much detail in. I am currently trying to update the plans for both the Othorn and the GH. Cleaning things up and making a few improvements...just take your time and double check me. Once you get the layout on a side panel the rest should really just be a matter of common sense building and looking at the basic panel placement.
post #228 of 758
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ricci View Post

Sorry...there are probably a few errors in there. I probably put too much detail in. I am currently trying to update the plans for both the Othorn and the GH. Cleaning things up and making a few improvements...just take your time and double check me. Once you get the layout on a side panel the rest should really just be a matter of common sense building and looking at the basic panel placement.

No problem Josh!
We appreciate all you do! smile.gif
post #229 of 758
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ricci View Post

Sorry...there are probably a few errors in there. I probably put too much detail in. I am currently trying to update the plans for both the Othorn and the GH. Cleaning things up and making a few improvements...just take your time and double check me. Once you get the layout on a side panel the rest should really just be a matter of common sense building and looking at the basic panel placement.

Yes, apologize immediately for doing all the work in making these awesome subwoofer designs and testing them. lol
post #230 of 758
Quote:
Originally Posted by lukeamdman View Post

Yes, apologize immediately for doing all the work in making these awesome subwoofer designs and testing them. lol

Or that! tongue.gif:D
post #231 of 758
Nice saw!

One of the best accessories you can get for any saw is a nice outfeed table...either roller style or just a flat panel. They help greatly.
post #232 of 758
Quote:
Originally Posted by jpmst3 View Post

No problem Josh!
We appreciate all you do! smile.gif

Exactly!
post #233 of 758
It would a bonus if there were a tall/narrow version of this design, ala THT LP style.

Anyone interested in tackling it?

I would gladly do it if I had even 2% of the know how.
Edited by jpmst3 - 2/15/13 at 12:39pm
post #234 of 758
So It looks like I'm out of luck, I cannot find anyone to build this beast, I've been turned down now by 23 different shops and custom furniture makers lol Every single response has been the same. "The plans are to complicated and they have no idea how to put it all together with the plans provided" They all were saying about having to do the conversions for the butt joints and so on.

lukeamdman how did you do the conversion to make all the pieces fit for butt joints on the cut lists? it looks like you'd have to convert all the measurements to make it work? I'd have no idea where to start.

The last guy I'm talkign to seem willing to give it a try but says he needs useable shop drawings with panels labeled and useable measurements to even consider building one lol
post #235 of 758
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by N8DOGG View Post

So It looks like I'm out of luck, I cannot find anyone to build this beast, I've been turned down now by 23 different shops and custom furniture makers lol Every single response has been the same. "The plans are to complicated and they have no idea how to put it all together with the plans provided" They all were saying about having to do the conversions for the butt joints and so on.

lukeamdman how did you do the conversion to make all the pieces fit for butt joints on the cut lists? it looks like you'd have to convert all the measurements to make it work? I'd have no idea where to start.

The last guy I'm talkign to seem willing to give it a try but says he needs useable shop drawings with panels labeled and useable measurements to even consider building one lol

I'm not using the cut list. From page 5 on the PDF I converted each measurement to the nearest 32nd of an inch. I then drew the template onto the side panels as seen in the previous pictures.

From the drawn template I can measure the angles of each cut. Basically, I'm making these one piece at time.

Honestly, it's not going to be that bad. I'll post pictures step by step in case anyone is curious.

This would have been overwhelming if it were my first DIY project for sure.
post #236 of 758
awesome thanks!
post #237 of 758
Thread Starter 
Ricci, does this picture show all the cross-bracing they used, or did add more later like the pdf shows?



Here's the PDF:



Thanks!
post #238 of 758
The UXL and LMS motors in a horn can create some serious force.
I would brace all the panels for sure.
post #239 of 758
It is really not as hard as it seems at all. You have to remember I originally tried to make this a kit to be cut on a cnc and then lock together perfectly. Luke has it right... Forget all of that to the umptenth precision on the measurements and the dado's etc...It is really not that hard...I'm not surprised most cab shops won't touch it though, too much work on something they are unfamiliar with. I mean every panel has exactly what it should be and it is not that hard to put together. It is just not worth it for them to fool with it when they can just build another kitchen cabinet or table.

1. You cut the 2 side panels and mark out the path on one. (This is the hard part.) Everything else stems from there and is built upon that panel.
2. Every internal piece from there except for bracing will have the same 22.5"-22.6" width. (exactly what is not important so long as they are the same. )
3. Cut the length of each panel followed by the angles on the ends of the panels somewhat close then just make sure they are centered on the path layout and glue and screw the **** out of them. (if you are 1/4" off on your length of the bend panels it won't amount to anything acoustically. Don't worry about perfection.
4. Use butt joints for everything if you want.
5. Start from the driver baffle and internal bend panels and work your way out. Add bracing as you go. It is bracing it doesn't have to be perfect. It is bracing. PL the hell out of it and screw em in if possible. Get crazy put extra in...Whatever just don't block the air flow. The edge of every brace should always be in the path not the side.
6. Continue with the rest of it.

The hardest part will probably be the driver access panel but it is not that difficult with a decent router and jig. It doesn't have to be exactly that size just get it where your driver fits in. Hell you can just jigsaw cut a big hole and scab a whole other piece of material over the hole if you want.

Again this is being way over thought. The critical component is getting the horn path correct. I can't stress that enough. That is the main key thing. After that it should be easy to go piece by piece. The rest is just building it solid, sealed up and well braced.

Luke,
Yes more bracing was added towards the end. Actually I am revamping the design a bit and simplifying it a bit and adding even more bracing. Instead of a center brace internally I am using 2 equally spaced braces on each internal panel. All except for at the mouth area.
Edited by Ricci - 2/16/13 at 7:35pm
post #240 of 758
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ricci View Post

It is really not as hard as it seems at all. You have to remember I originally tried to make this a kit to be cut on a cnc and then lock together perfectly. Luke has it right... Forget all of that to the umptenth precision on the measurements and the dado's etc...It is really not that hard...I'm not surprised most cab shops won't touch it though, too much work on something they are unfamiliar with. I mean every panel has exactly what it should be and it is not that hard to put together. It is just not worth it for them to fool with it when they can just build another kitchen cabinet or table.

1. You cut the 2 side panels and mark out the path on one. (This is the hard part.) Everything else stems from there and is built upon that panel.
2. Every internal piece from there except for bracing will have the same 22.5"-22.6" width. (exactly what is not important so long as they are the same. )
3. Cut the length of each panel followed by the angles on the ends of the panels somewhat close then just make sure they are centered on the path layout and glue and screw the **** out of them. (if you are 1/4" off on your length of the bend panels it won't amount to anything acoustically. Don't worry about perfection.
4. Use butt joints for everything if you want.
5. Start from the driver baffle and internal bend panels and work your way out. Add bracing as you go. It is bracing it doesn't have to be perfect. It is bracing. PL the hell out of it and screw em in if possible. Get crazy put extra in...Whatever just don't block the air flow. The edge of every brace should always be in the path not the side.
6. Continue with the rest of it.

The hardest part will probably be the driver access panel but it is not that difficult with a decent router and jig. It doesn't have to be exactly that size just get it where your driver fits in. Hell you can just jigsaw cut a big hole and scab a whole other piece of material over the hole if you want.

Again this is being way over thought. The critical component is getting the horn path correct. I can't stress that enough. That is the main key thing. After that it should be easy to go piece by piece. The rest is just building it solid, sealed up and well braced.

Luke,
Yes more bracing was added towards the end. Actually I am revamping the design a bit and simplifying it a bit and adding even more bracing. Instead of a center brace internally I am using 2 equally spaced braces on each internal panel. All except for at the mouth area.

If you think more bracing is needed, and you did imply more was needed before, I'll incorporate your idea and have two braces parallel to each other evenly spaced.

One last question. Any gasket tape needed between the driver and the plate? I see you left that black rubber surround thingy on the 5400 when you bolted it in.
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