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Is there a way to turn on / off speaker pairs over ethernet?

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Does anyone know if a device is made, or something you can make yourself, that will allow you to see a webpage, or have some application pointing to an IP address of a device (in other words Ethernet connection) and allow you turn on or off different speaker sets in rooms all over my house. Have 7 distinct rooms I would like to control from a laptop.

I have a 2 zone receiver, zone 2 is hooked up to a manual speaker switch (that is hooked to pairs of speakers in various rooms) and I hate walking down there to manually take some rooms off, I have a denon 2112ci and I can view its webpage and control zone 2, but not which speaker sets are used with zone 2, still have to walk down there... ug.

TIA
post #2 of 14
Is IR a possibility?

http://www.xantech.com/Controls/ControllersSwitches/ControllersSwitchers/68610/
or something like this could work.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/7-Zone-Speaker-Selector-with-Remote-Control-Power-Handling-400W-ATM-7-/290778899516?pt=US_Audio_Cables_Adapters&hash=item43b3c5e43c

If you do find an IR device, you can also use this
http://www.globalcache.com/products/itach/wf2irspecs/

I believe you can trigger IR commands over a webpage.

Just throwing some things out there to spark some ideas.
post #3 of 14
On the idea front...

Replace the speaker selector and zone2 amp with an HTD system with their control app. Not "free", but you'll also gain individual volume control and source selection, and have a lot more flexible system.

The types of hassles you describe are very common for these types of multi-room-with-speaker-selector setups. I had a similar setup previously and had the Xantech switcher, too! Which can work, although I used an RF remote and a base station to control it (which worked fine). But with seven rooms, you should really think about a whole house audio system - and the HTD is a good (and least expensive) way to go.

Jeff
post #4 of 14
Most people using z2 off an AVR use in-wall volume controls in each zone, paired with a speaker 'selector' box. I never touched my speaker selector - I only used the VCs.

You might be able to use an IR-controlled SSB (maybe Aton), with a GC iTach (IP addressable IR extender/convertor). Don't know for sure, never used either.
post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 
IR is not an option. Each room does already have discrete audio volume knob so that is there. The avr2112ci already allows for volume of zone 2 control remotely so don't really need HTD system. But that sounds right. Any other thoughts welcome for remote Ethernet based speaker selection only welcome!
post #6 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by brastaj View Post

IR is not an option. Each room does already have discrete audio volume knob so that is there. The avr2112ci already allows for volume of zone 2 control remotely so don't really need HTD system. But that sounds right. Any other thoughts welcome for remote Ethernet based speaker selection only welcome!

Ok, if you've got in-room volume controls the upgrade to a WHA system is probably overkill until you really need multiple sources simultaneously.

But brettvdi had it right - it's only IR for the last few inches... iRule control with a Global Cache iTach IP-to-IR bridge, controlling something like the Xantech speaker selector. If I can find that Xantech piece I loaned out to a friend, it's for sale. biggrin.gif

With the iTach in place, you should be able to easily construct some code to send the IR commands even without iRule, if that's a barrier (for $50, probably not).

Jeff
post #7 of 14
You don't need to touch the SSB, or the Denon volume. Use the in-wall VCs for volume control. With the SSB, every zone is always on. You turn the sound off at the VC.
post #8 of 14
Would using Global Cache's contact closures wired to the switches on the speaker selector be an option? That's what I'm currently trying to do, but my speaker selector has 3 DPST switches and my GC unit only has 3 contact closures.

I'm currently debating between picking up some DPST relays and a power supply to wire between the contact closures and the speaker selector or just buying another Global Cache unit.
post #9 of 14
I've never heard of doing this, with only 1 source, but you could use a matrix switch, with 232 and/or IP control, in place of a speaker selector box. Make sure you have impedance matching somewhere in the mix. Many matrix switches for cheap on eBay.

Come to think of it, it's probably done so commonly that nobody discusses it.
post #10 of 14
Can anyone confirm that a component video switch can be used for just audio?
post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neurorad View Post

I've never heard of doing this, with only 1 source, but you could use a matrix switch, with 232 and/or IP control, in place of a speaker selector box. Make sure you have impedance matching somewhere in the mix. Many matrix switches for cheap on eBay.
Come to think of it, it's probably done so commonly that nobody discusses it.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Neurorad View Post

Can anyone confirm that a component video switch can be used for just audio?

That's a really good idea. I have a component distribution amp (1x3) that I just tested with audio and it worked fine. Hopefully a matrix doesn't require a load on the video.
post #12 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neurorad View Post

Can anyone confirm that a component video switch can be used for just audio?

Yes and no. A passive mechanical only switch can easily switch audio.

Problems with active electronic switches:

1) Video inputs are terminated with a 75 ohm resistor to ground. This is too low for most consumer audio products and will reduce the signal level quite a bit.

2) Video signals are standardized at 1 volt. Line level -10db nominal audio can reach 3 volts or more at peaks. A video switcher will likely clip these peaks and cause significant distortion.

3) Some higher quality prosumer and most broadcast grade switchers have DC restoration circuits for the video. These will cause distortion with an audio signal.
post #13 of 14
I've honestly never used component video.

Isn't the analog audio separate from the video? The video matrix switches I've seen online have separate connectors for audio.

I wouldn't think of using the component video connections, for audio. Just use the audio connectors of the switch.

Sorry for the confusion. I thought a used component video switch might be cheaper than a dedicated audio matrix.
post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neurorad View Post

I've honestly never used component video.
Isn't the analog audio separate from the video? The video matrix switches I've seen online have separate connectors for audio.
I wouldn't think of using the component video connections, for audio. Just use the audio connectors of the switch.
Sorry for the confusion. I thought a used component video switch might be cheaper than a dedicated audio matrix.

OK, you mean just using the audio portion of the component switch. That's fine.
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