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Sony Laser Projection...... Update - Page 2

post #31 of 88
A laser is no different than any other light source. For 2D, the answer is known therefore. no special screen would be required. For 3D, it once again does not depend on the light source but on the methode chosen to present 3D. If passive polarization, the screen must have a high polarization extnction ratio or in layman's terms preserve to a high extent polarized light hitting it and being able to bounce it off polarized, that is no randomize it. therefore, one would need to know the method this projector x would use. If anyone knew, they would be prohibited from telling you.
post #32 of 88
Thread Starter 
http://www.engadget.com/2013/01/29/sony-unveils-laser-light-source-projector/
post #33 of 88

yes but how long we should still wait for a home cinema laser projector (from Sony)?
Edited by Grifo - 1/29/13 at 10:46am
post #34 of 88
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Grifo View Post

yes but how long we should still wait for an home cinema laser projector (from Sony)?

Hehe, Well lets just say This model they had ready last year at cedia and showed it under Black curtains. you could only see a lens out of the curtain.

If all things go smoothly you may see a 4k laser by Cedia. The Laser modules are in production now.
post #35 of 88
Some more details from ISE 2013
http://www.engadget.com/2013/01/29/sony-unveils-laser-light-source-projector/

Doesn't look like a home cinema model though
post #36 of 88
It's definitly not a home cinema model
post #37 of 88
Thread Starter 
Its a Pro Projector from there installation Series.
post #38 of 88
Sorry, I just realised I double posted the Engadget link. I guess though this makes the potential for a laser based VW95 somewhat more likely?
post #39 of 88
4,000 lumens is perfect for a large home rear projection unit. The question is the price. Will it be cheaper to buy the laser projector and not have to change bulbs, or will it be cheaper to keep buying bulb projectors? Most folks probably never get more than 8,000 hours out of a projector anyway before they want to trade up for newer technology.
post #40 of 88
This is a very intriguing development, and signifies a notable positive move by Sony. I'm anxious to see how this unit performs. It appears as if there may be some interesting developments in the pipe.
post #41 of 88
RED, Sony....who next?........the laser wars are a happenin'...
post #42 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by inky blacks View Post

4,000 lumens is perfect for a large home rear projection unit. The question is the price. Will it be cheaper to buy the laser projector and not have to change bulbs, or will it be cheaper to keep buying bulb projectors? Most folks probably never get more than 8,000 hours out of a projector anyway before they want to trade up for newer technology.

Like any new technology it will be costly as an early adopter, but once lasers become the norm you'll see prices fall.
post #43 of 88
In the portable presentation market, there really is no such thing as early adopters. Its a decision, light, really bright, and no need to worry about bulbs blowing up or failing during a presentation. Buying is need driven in this market.
Edited by mark haflich - 1/30/13 at 6:21am
post #44 of 88
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mark haflich View Post

In the portable presentation market, there really is no such thing as early adopters. Its a decision, light, really bright, and no need to worry about bulbs blowing up or failing during a presentation. vuying is need driven in this marget.t

Exactly Most people that will be using these projectors will be running them all day long.
post #45 of 88
Looking at the specs for the coming Optoma HT laser/led hybrid model shown overseas last week, you would seem to gain nothing performance wise just pay a lot more for the honor of not periodically changing a bulb. If one changes a bulb and not the gage assembly too, the laser odel would have to be only several thousand dollars more before it would make any sense.
post #46 of 88
If you mean the HD91, and have details please enlighten us biggrin.gif
post #47 of 88
No I don't have any details more than that have been here posted.

I need to see a big performace improvement before I would shell out to buy a HT laser lit projector.

And, its just me, but I would never buy an Optoma.
post #48 of 88
Thread Starter 
the Big advantage for business owners will be Longer operations with Consistent Lumen output. Also less failures Do to Overheating etc...
post #49 of 88
I was getting off topic. I just don't see the advantage of laser lit for HT theaters if the cost differential is very high. HT projectors tend to obsolete very quickly and certainly most tend to replace their projector with 5 years. lasers need a performance advantage over a savings in bulb costs.
post #50 of 88
Are there some confusion here?

The original poster in this thread mention a 4K professional laser projector. They tend to be with RGB lasers like in the Barco, Christie and Red Laser projectors, which result in better color reproduction than a bulb projector.

The Sony laser 3LCD projector linked to in the Engadget article is a HD presentation laser projector that use white-light-laser to LCD panels for light engine. Shouldn't have any advantage over bulb projector other than stronger light-output and longer lifetime of the light engine than a bulb.
post #51 of 88
It's probably not only a longer lifetime, but also a longer colorspace stability. Meaning you don't have to recalibrate every couple hundred of hours like you do with bulb projectors if you want "perfect" calibration projection. Furthermore with bulb projectors often the max contrast spec is only achieved with a new bulb. As a the bulb ages, often not only brightness goes down, but also contrast. Then with bulb projectors you have to be careful not to turn them on/off all the time. You shouldn't just turn them on for 5 minutes to see the news or something like that. All of these problems should not apply to laser/LED projectors which I find important benefits.
post #52 of 88
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by coolscan View Post

Are there some confusion here?

The original poster in this thread mention a 4K professional laser projector. They tend to be with RGB lasers like in the Barco, Christie and Red Laser projectors, which result in better color reproduction than a bulb projector.

The Sony laser 3LCD projector linked to in the Engadget article is a HD presentation laser projector that use white-light-laser to LCD panels for light engine. Shouldn't have any advantage over bulb projector other than stronger light-output and longer lifetime of the light engine than a bulb.


It is using a RGB laser module together instead of splitting the RGB separately.
post #53 of 88
Quote:
And, its just me, but I would never buy an Optoma.

As an HD81 owner, I can say it ISN'T just you. I'll never buy another product from them.
post #54 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by space2001 View Post

It is using a RGB laser module together instead of splitting the RGB separately.
That's what I guessed. Then the light has to be split again and sent through color filters to each panel in stead of sending each pure laser color directly to each panel. This would loose the color advantage of laser I would think.
post #55 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by space2001 View Post

Sony Has been working with Laser Light Engine(http://www.laserlightengines.com) for there projectors.

Sony Showed only select people last year at NAB there 4k Cinema with Laser.

If it is ready for CES they will be Showing the 4k home projector with the Laser Light engine, streaming from the 4k box.

The info is pretty hush about this stuff, and hopefully next week it will be shown.

There is also in the works a upgrade to replace XENON and UHP bulbs to laser. I don't know which models, but the light engine will be external and have fiber optics to the projector.

Take all this info with a grain of salt, as these things may take longer to come.


Quote:
Originally Posted by coolscan View Post

Are there some confusion here?

The original poster in this thread mention a 4K professional laser projector. They tend to be with RGB lasers like in the Barco, Christie and Red Laser projectors, which result in better color reproduction than a bulb projector.

The Sony laser 3LCD projector linked to in the Engadget article is a HD presentation laser projector that use white-light-laser to LCD panels for light engine. Shouldn't have any advantage over bulb projector other than stronger light-output and longer lifetime of the light engine than a bulb.

Coolscan: Agreed - This thread was started to talk about an consumer 4K home cinema projector using a laser light source. The model announced at ISE 2013 is not that (basically a 16 x 10 variation of a 1080p LCD business projector using a laser light engine).

Space2001: Was the speculation simply wrong about an upcoming 4K home cinema model or is there still such a model in Sony's plans for 2013?
post #56 of 88
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ron Jones View Post


Coolscan: Agreed - This thread was started to talk about an consumer 4K home cinema projector using a laser light source. The model announced at ISE 2013 is not that (basically a 16 x 10 variation of a 1080p LCD business projector using a laser light engine).

Space2001: Was the speculation simply wrong about an upcoming 4K home cinema model or is there still such a model in Sony's plans for 2013?

I started the thread to talk about Sony Laser projectors in General. I can't talk to much about it but they did have a showing of SOMETHING SOMEWHERE with a Black curtain.

But I can say that Sony will fully be moving to lasers in all there home theater products. It will just take a bit of time since they have to make modifications to the current projectors.

And Since I live in Canada, I get info usually last hehe.
post #57 of 88
So laser can work with "normal" screens.. white vinyl or weave? It doesn't necessarily require special screens I think I read about at one time?
post #58 of 88
More like a computer resolution (1920x1200).

I wonder how the quality will be and at what price?
post #59 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by hifiaudio2 View Post

So laser can work with "normal" screens.. white vinyl or weave? It doesn't necessarily require special screens I think I read about at one time?
That is kind of the big question.
In general it is no difference. A RGB laser will give better and wider colorspace than a lamp. With laser light engine you also save on the optics because you can use a lens with a smaller aperture/F-stop because of the difference in Etendue. Lenses with smaller aperture is much cheaper to make. Think f/4-f/6 for laser and f/1.8 for lamp is typical.
This also gives a deep DOF so there will be less need for focusing the lens.

The question of screen depends on the big problem with Lasers and one of the major reasons Laser projectors have not been launched yet is Speckle.
If special screens are found to be able to reduce Speckle, then it might become an issue.
For passive 3D silver screens might become a necessity.
post #60 of 88
Quote:
Originally Posted by hifiaudio2 View Post

So laser can work with "normal" screens.. white vinyl or weave? It doesn't necessarily require special screens I think I read about at one time?

I answered that question at the top of this page. I know researching a question is hard work, but . . . smile.gif
Edited by mark haflich - 2/1/13 at 3:39pm
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