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How can you tell when the sound quality is improved the more money you spend?

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 
I have a 2006 Pioneer 1016 receiver I'm considering upgrading for no other reason than to upgrade. It's THX certified select 2. I see only the upper/middle end Pioneer receivers are THX certified now, not that is an official stamp of SQ, but I use the setting currently when I watch movies.

How can you tell with any brand, not just Pioneer when you are getting a better SQ receiver than the lower model? I'm sure there are groups that have the same guts but have some other features such as video upgrades or wifi. I don't really care about that stuff as much as getting the best sound. So if there is one model that has 9.1 and one that has 7.1 with the same SQ I want the cheaper one.

I know there is the Cambridge, NAD, and some other brands that pride on SQ but you seem to lose a lot of other features. I still would like to run my video through the receiver and would like to stick to the main big box brands as they seem to fight with each other over the best all around packages. I just can't tell when you go up one model over the other if you are getting into the next level of sound.
post #2 of 5
I'm pretty much in the same boat. I've been running the 1016 since 2006 also but I've had it paired up with an Emotiva LPA-1 amp. I've upgraded my entire system over the last month or so and the receiver is the last piece. Everything sounds good but I'm wondering how much I'd gain being able to run my audio through HDMI for Blu Ray. I'm thinking about the Pioneer SC-1522 or maybe the SC-65.
post #3 of 5
Thread Starter 
Right. Is there a Sq difference between the two you want and what about it makes it that way?
post #4 of 5
Well, suffice to say I think it would be the room correction system that it comes with that makes the biggest difference in sound between receivers.

Audyssey come in at a few different levels, Yamaha has YPAO but the one I really admire is Anthem's own ARC (Anthem Room Correction)

Even their lowest model (MRX300) c/w with this system that offers a high grade microphone along with a sturdy boom to measure your room.
You actually use a computer to do this all and it will even give you graphs of all your speaker frequencies so you can see exactly what differences ARC will make.

A lot more in depth IMO and the results are fantastic. Check out the supporting thread if you need more info.
post #5 of 5
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yosh70 View Post

Well, suffice to say I think it would be the room correction system that it comes with that makes the biggest difference in sound between receivers.
Audyssey come in at a few different levels, Yamaha has YPAO but the one I really admire is Anthem's own ARC (Anthem Room Correction)
Even their lowest model (MRX300) c/w with this system that offers a high grade microphone along with a sturdy boom to measure your room.
You actually use a computer to do this all and it will even give you graphs of all your speaker frequencies so you can see exactly what differences ARC will make.
A lot more in depth IMO and the results are fantastic. Check out the supporting thread if you need more info.

That Onkyo 818 with the xt32 looks interesting. I like how you can take measurements at several locations and EQ several subs. I have a Behringer 1124 for sub EQ but the minute you change from the couch to the chair it's back off. Having that Audyssey seems like it would help. I'm to the point now I don't even use my mcacc and just run the speakers flat because it's so different from one seat to the next. It's only good if you sit in the same spot all the time or your room is perfect. I put up a bunch of panels and traps and that seemed to make a big difference.
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