or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › Audio › Audio theory, Setup and Chat › Simplified REW Setup and Use (USB Mic & HDMI Connection) Including Measurement Techniques and How To Interpret Graphs
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Simplified REW Setup and Use (USB Mic & HDMI Connection) Including Measurement Techniques and How... - Page 125

post #3721 of 9577
Hi Guys

Trying to do EQ with my new SVS SB13-Ultra.

Finally, got my UMM-6 mic working on OS X (I think). It "worked" before, but had really sharp fall off and very low levels. I set it as the default input device in Audio Midi App in OS X (Mountain Lion on new MBP 15") and then selected "default device". That resulted in the afore mentioned poor readings.

After changing it to "built-in", I got much better readings. I confirmed it was the correct input by turning on SPL in REW and gently tapping the Mic: the DB's jumped 20-30db and it said "OVER" when i did it.

Can other OS X users tell me what settings they used? (I'm on REW 5.01B7)

My AVR (Denon 4311CI) was set for stereo and LFE enabled for 2Ch with 100hz Xover

I posted measurements below for a sanity check



WF No Audessey


WF Audessey


Spectro No Audessey



Spectro Audessey


Not quite sure how to interpret the spetro. I know tails are bad and that's about it. From the waterfall, it looks like Audessey has curtailed a lot of the ringing. From the SPL's I don't see much differences other than amplitude (between 10 and 100hz Xover)

I guess I should post these on a different thread for feedback

Regards

mark

Gear mentioned in this thread:

post #3722 of 9577
Mark,

What are you measuring? Left+Right+Subs? Are the mains set to small?

Something is still peculiar with the frequency response graph. It should not have such a steep roll-off towards 20Hz, if your sub is working properly. And you don't need to have the left scale go down to zero. 15-300Hz is the range we have been using for low frequency measurements, no smoothing.

Don't know what to say about the Spectrographs--no one here has been doing those graphs.
post #3723 of 9577
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post

When using an external soundcard with a "legacy" REW kit, there are two audio channels. One of the channels is used to output the REW test signal. The unused audio channel can be looped back, I.e. the output can be connected back to the input for the same channel. This loop back provides REW with a timing reference that allows it to compensate for any internal delays caused by the measurement electronics. This is about the extent of my knowledge, and it wouldn't surprise me if I have explained it wrong. However, one of our expert contributors reminds us periodically that use of a loop back improves the accuracy of distance measurements when running impulse response measurements.

However, when using a USB mic (and no external sound card), a loop back connection is not possible. Several other of the expert contributors have said that the usefulness of the impulse response measurements are not affected significantly. So, the take-away is that we don't need to worry about it.

Jerry really got it in that loopback as timing will give you a more accurate distance measurement from your speaker's acoustic center to the actual reflection for use with the string method. I went round and round with Dragonfyr on this topic and came to the conclusion that is correct, but also as mentioned you can get there with relative accuracy not using loopback, but you need to physically measure the distance from the speaker to the mic and then add the additional REW measured distance from the direct signal to the reflection in question to the speaker/mic distance to get total path.

As info, following is an example of the loopback measurement showing the distance traveled to the mic and total distance traveled to the reflection.





With this, you would be able to see exactly how long your string needs to be, in this case 14.6'. So the big question is where exactly do you tie off your string at the speaker, that is to say, where is your acoustic center? There will always be some margin of error, which is why the string method was recommended really only as a method to understand the concept, with the blocking method as a more productive/easier way to diagnose.smile.gif
post #3724 of 9577
Fotto, thanks for the additional information. I believe I recall someone saying that there is a method using REW to determine the acoustic center of a speaker. Would you be familiar with how it is done?

Edit: An internet search produced a number of hits, most notably a pissing contest between SAC and DanDan over on GS. The consensus from that thread seems to be that for all practical purposes, i.e. for REW, the tweeter can be considered the acoustic center.
Edited by AustinJerry - 6/19/13 at 9:10pm
post #3725 of 9577
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post

Mark,

What are you measuring? Left+Right+Subs? Are the mains set to small?

Something is still peculiar with the frequency response graph. It should not have such a steep roll-off towards 20Hz, if your sub is working properly. And you don't need to have the left scale go down to zero. 15-300Hz is the range we have been using for low frequency measurements, no smoothing.

Don't know what to say about the Spectrographs--no one here has been doing those graphs.

Hi Jerry, yes mains are set to small

this is L+R+Sub
post #3726 of 9577
Quote:
Originally Posted by fotto View Post

Jerry really got it in that loopback as timing will give you a more accurate distance measurement from your speaker's acoustic center to the actual reflection for use with the string method. I went round and round with Dragonfyr on this topic and came to the conclusion that is correct, but also as mentioned you can get there with relative accuracy not using loopback, but you need to physically measure the distance from the speaker to the mic and then add the additional REW measured distance from the direct signal to the reflection in question to the speaker/mic distance to get total path.

As info, following is an example of the loopback measurement showing the distance traveled to the mic and total distance traveled to the reflection.





With this, you would be able to see exactly how long your string needs to be, in this case 14.6'. So the big question is where exactly do you tie off your string at the speaker, that is to say, where is your acoustic center? There will always be some margin of error, which is why the string method was recommended really only as a method to understand the concept, with the blocking method as a more productive/easier way to diagnose.smile.gif

Thanks for explanation

Will be some time before I get to this degree of setup !
post #3727 of 9577
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post

Mark,

What are you measuring? Left+Right+Subs? Are the mains set to small?

Something is still peculiar with the frequency response graph. It should not have such a steep roll-off towards 20Hz, if your sub is working properly. And you don't need to have the left scale go down to zero. 15-300Hz is the range we have been using for low frequency measurements, no smoothing.

Don't know what to say about the Spectrographs--no one here has been doing those graphs.

Hmmm... maybe I should try with Windows again. Getting frustrationg now. Anyone with UMM-6 and Mountain Lion care to share their settings?

Any suggestions of how I can "test" the mic to see if it's measuring accurately?

Sub sounds incredible. Just watched "The Watch" this evening...sound in last scene is incredible with the SVS
post #3728 of 9577
Quote:
Originally Posted by mark_anderson_u View Post


Hmmm... maybe I should try with Windows again. Getting frustrationg now. Anyone with UMM-6 and Mountain Lion care to share their settings?

Any suggestions of how I can "test" the mic to see if it's measuring accurately?

Sub sounds incredible. Just watched "The Watch" this evening...sound in last scene is incredible with the SVS

 

Mark,

 

I'll say it again--your bass response curve is not normal looking.  This could only mean one of two things, either your sub isn't working properly, or your REW measurement is flawed.

 

Since you say that the sub sounds fine, I'll assume it's the REW setup.  Unfortunately, by choosing a MAC solution, you are more or less flying solo.  I have no experience with REW on a MAC, so I'm having a difficult time understanding what the issue might be.

 

If you are interested in doing some trouble-shooting, then here is what I recommend.  Take screen shots of the following REW screens:  the Preferences/Soundcard screen, the Preferences/Mic-Meter screen, the REW SPL Meter screen showing the results of a mic calibration, and the Measure screen while a measurement is in progress (showing the input and output level meters while it is conducting the measurement sweep).  Post these screen shots, and it may become obvious where the issue is.

 

Can you do this?

post #3729 of 9577

I can't upload an image to AVS!  frown.gif  I have been trying all sorts of things for over an hour, and the upload hangs when I click on "Submit".  Has anyone else ever experienced this?



Edit: I got it working when setting image size to "Small". Very strange.
Edited by AustinJerry - 6/20/13 at 7:09am
post #3730 of 9577
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post

Fotto, thanks for the additional information. I believe I recall someone saying that there is a method using REW to determine the acoustic center of a speaker. Would you be familiar with how it is done?
Sorry but no.
Quote:
Originally Posted by mark_anderson_u View Post

Any suggestions of how I can "test" the mic to see if it's measuring accurately?

Something I would try is to sit where your mic is, open up the Generator tool, select sine wave and check the "Frequency tracks cursor", click the green arrow to start the generator, then click and hold your crosshair within your SPL graph, and slowly drag your crosshair along the frequency in the x-axis. You will hear the generator tone track your frequency and resulting SPL. Although somewhat subjective, that should give you some sense of the real SPL level vs. the measurement and possibly point you in a particular direction for more diagnosis if things don't seem to correspond.

It's pretty neat to park the tone on a peak (or null), then get up and walk around the room and see how different positions put you in and out of that peak or null.
post #3731 of 9577
Quote:
Originally Posted by mark_anderson_u View Post

Any suggestions of how I can "test" the mic to see if it's measuring accurately?

 

 

Here are several things to try:

 

First, make sure the mic calibration is good.

 

  1. Open the REW SPL meter.
  2. Generate the calibration tone.
  3. Adjust the AVR master volume until you get a reading of 80dB on your external hand-held SPL meter, which should be placed (or held) close to the tip of the REW mic.
  4. Enter "80" into the REW input box and click "Finished".
  5. Verify that the headroom pop-up has a good value (I usually get somewhere 110-115dB).
  6. Click the Calibrate button a second time, generate the test tone, and drag the Reading Input window out of the way (as per the example below).

 

The REW SPL Meter window should be showing 80dB.  Does it?

 

 

Second test, measure the mic's input level:

 

  1. Open the Generator tool and select a tone, e.g. Pink Noise at 1000Hz, as per the example below. 
  2. Open the REW SPL Meter and click on Logger, which opens the SPL logging window. 
  3. In the logger window, adjust the upper and lower limits to a wide range, say 0-100dB. 
  4. Now click on the red Start Logging button in the upper right corner to start logging.
  5. In the Generater window, click the Start button to generate the tone.
  6. In the logger window, observe the level at which REW is measuring the tone.
  7. If the mic is working properly, you should see the log line at approximately 80dB, the calibration level of the mic.

 

 

Report back your results, please.

post #3732 of 9577
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post

Here are several things to try:

First, make sure the mic calibration is good.
  1. Open the REW SPL meter.
  2. Generate the calibration tone.
  3. Adjust the AVR master volume until you get a reading of 80dB on your external hand-held SPL meter, which should be placed (or held) close to the tip of the REW mic.
  4. Enter "80" into the REW input box and click "Finished".
  5. Verify that the headroom pop-up has a good value (I usually get somewhere 110-115dB).
  6. Click the Calibrate button a second time, generate the test tone, and drag the Reading Input window out of the way (as per the example below).

The REW SPL Meter window should be showing 80dB.  Does it?




Second test, measure the mic's input level:
  1. Open the Generator tool and select a tone, e.g. Pink Noise at 1000Hz, as per the example below. 
  2. Open the REW SPL Meter and click on Logger, which opens the SPL logging window. 
  3. In the logger window, adjust the upper and lower limits to a wide range, say 0-100dB. 
  4. Now click on the red Start Logging button in the upper right corner to start logging.
  5. In the Generater window, click the Start button to generate the tone.
  6. In the logger window, observe the level at which REW is measuring the tone.
  7. If the mic is working properly, you should see the log line at approximately 80dB, the calibration level of the mic.




Report back your results, please.
Can I do the measurement sweep at volume >80dB after this SPL meter setup at 80dB?
For the "LEVEL CHECKS" procedure in the PREFERENCE, the OUT is at -12dB and the IN should be adjusted to about -18dB (that's what mentioned in the help). Will the reduction of the IN level affect the headroom (which you mention somewhere 110-115dB)?
post #3733 of 9577
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skylinestar View Post

Can I do the measurement sweep at volume >80dB after this SPL meter setup at 80dB?
For the "LEVEL CHECKS" procedure in the PREFERENCE, the OUT is at -12dB and the IN should be adjusted to about -18dB (that's what mentioned in the help). Will the reduction of the IN level affect the headroom (which you mention somewhere 110-115dB)?

If you want the sweep to run at a higher level, simply adjust the AVR master volume to a higher level during the mic calibration and enter the corresponding value to set the calibration. I generally use 85dB to provide approximately 40dB above the noise floor. I find anything louder than 85dB a bit too painful to my ears. I need to remember to buy some earplugs!
post #3734 of 9577
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post

If you want the sweep to run at a higher level, simply adjust the AVR master volume to a higher level during the mic calibration and enter the corresponding value to set the calibration. I generally use 85dB to provide approximately 40dB above the noise floor. I find anything louder than 85dB a bit too painful to my ears. I need to remember to buy some earplugs!
Huh!?! I didn't hear what you said!
post #3735 of 9577
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Skylinestar View Post

Can I do the measurement sweep at volume >80dB after this SPL meter setup at 80dB?
For the "LEVEL CHECKS" procedure in the PREFERENCE, the OUT is at -12dB and the IN should be adjusted to about -18dB (that's what mentioned in the help). Will the reduction of the IN level affect the headroom (which you mention somewhere 110-115dB)?

If you want the sweep to run at a higher level, simply adjust the AVR master volume to a higher level during the mic calibration and enter the corresponding value to set the calibration. I generally use 85dB to provide approximately 40dB above the noise floor. I find anything louder than 85dB a bit too painful to my ears. I need to remember to buy some earplugs!
Love these
http://www.amazon.com/Etymotic-Research-ETY-Plugs-Protection-Earplugs/dp/B0044DEESS/ref=pd_cp_MI_0
http://www.amazon.com/gp/customer-media/product-gallery/B0015WNZ9K/ref=cm_ciu_pdp_images_0?ie=UTF8&index=0

Get the baby blues if you have smaller ear canals. The clear whites if you have larger ear canals. Allows you to hear normally without muffling the mids/highs the way regular foam plugs do. 20db attenuation.


Max
post #3736 of 9577

Interesting, Max, thanks for the tip!

post #3737 of 9577
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post

Interesting, Max, thanks for the tip!
Aside from looking odd with earplugs (or folks might take them for hearing aids), these are GREAT for concerts or loud clubs too, as they allow you to hear almost normally, but at lower levels, i.e. unlike foam plugs, you can hear people talking to you (they don't attenuate the frequencies in vocals disproportionately the way foam plugs do. You can still hear speech (and even crickets and such), just at lower volume levels, like turning down the volume of real life LOL.

They're great for driving too, as they'll attenuate road noise, but still allow you to hear things like car horns etc. AND they're invaluable if you happen to have to sit in a vehicle with someone who likes to turn the sound system up louder than you do (I tend to play music in the vehicle at far lower levels than normal folks, just a little above the level of ambient road/wind noise at highway speeds. The music is just as a distraction while driving). If anyone listens to classical or acoustic music, you've probably realized that a lot of it is NOT recorded for vehicular playback (unlike pop music which is normalized to hell and gone). Acoustic and/or classical music tends to have a greater dynamic range with soft passages and loud passages, where pop music is just normalized to a very small dynamic range (because they know that a vast majority of folks listen to pop music while driving and in loud ambient noise conditions (on the subway on an Ipod etc.) so they need to normalize the audio to sound decent under these conditions. The assumption though, is that many classical and acoustic afficionados will be more likely to listen critically in more ideal conditions/surroundings (i.e. with better sound systems at home with lower ambient noise).

For me, turning up something like Esbjorn Svensson Trio so the bass notes are clear above the ambient road/wind noise levels means that I find the loud passages too loud. These plugs allow me to reduce the overall SPL's so I can turn up the volume altering the relative difference between the softer passages compared to the ambient noise, in effect, reducing the noise floor, while turning up the volume to what I find comfortable listening levels.

Be warned though, that constant use for hours like this is not for everyone. If you're accustomed to using earplugs of any kind for extended periods (whether they're foam plugs or Etymotic in-ear monitors like the ER-4P, then these will be similar. If you're NOT used to earplugs for extended use, these may become uncomfortable for extended use till you're conditioned to having plugs in your ears.


Max
post #3738 of 9577
Quote:
Originally Posted by djbluemax1 View Post

Love these
http://www.amazon.com/Etymotic-Research-ETY-Plugs-Protection-Earplugs/dp/B0044DEESS/ref=pd_cp_MI_0
http://www.amazon.com/gp/customer-media/product-gallery/B0015WNZ9K/ref=cm_ciu_pdp_images_0?ie=UTF8&index=0

Get the baby blues if you have smaller ear canals. The clear whites if you have larger ear canals. Allows you to hear normally without muffling the mids/highs the way regular foam plugs do. 20db attenuation.


Max
I have the 3M 1100 foam ear plugs. cool.gif
post #3739 of 9577
I finally got a chance to play with the crossover settings. Someone here suggested raising the LP filter from 80 to 100. That helped along with lowering the HP filter from 100 to 75.

I tried about 9 different combinations. Here's the graph showing my original settings (lighter colored graph, LPF 80, HPF 100) and the best of the new settings (darker colored graph, LPF 100, HPF 75). No smoothing was applied.


There is an audible improvement with the new settings. Suggestions for further improvements are welcome. smile.gif
Edited by Saturn94 - 6/24/13 at 5:43pm
post #3740 of 9577
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saturn94 View Post

I finally got a chance to pay with the crossover settings. Someone here suggested raising the LP filter from 80 to 100. That helped along with lowering the HP filter from 100 to 75.

I tried about 9 different combinations. Here's the graph showing my original settings (lighter colored graph, LPF 80, HPF 100) and the best of the new settings (darker colored graph, LPF 100, HPF 75). No smoothing was applied.


There is an audible improvement with the new settings. Suggestions for further improvements are welcome. smile.gif

 

I went back and re-read your original postings to make sure I remembered your setup properly.  So, it looks like the response measured by the purple line has improved the serious dip at around 120Hz.  Otherwise, the two responses are still pretty close to each other.  This doesn't surprise me, because playing around with the crossover values normally doesn't help all that much.

 

To be honest, you should be able to improve the bass response significantly from where you are now.  The dip at 55Hz really needs to be addressed, and the 120Hz dip still isn't good.

 

The first recommendation, and one that doesn't cost a penny, is to leverage REW measurements to find the best location for the sub.  Move it around into every possible location and re-measure to see if you can flatten out those dips.  If that doesn't yield any improvement, the next thing to consider would be a second sub, which has proven for many people to be a good investment, if better bass is your objective.

 

And finally, equalization can help as well, but the general rule is to experiment with sub placement first.

post #3741 of 9577
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post

To be honest, you should be able to improve the bass response significantly from where you are now.  The dip at 55Hz really needs to be addressed, and the 120Hz dip still isn't good.
Narrowband dips like the one at 55 Hz are not very audible. The way to determine audibility is to look at the probabilities. The narrower the variation, i.e. dip here, the lower the odds that something in the source will excite it and make it audible. If you look at the graph, we see the ~55 Hz dip is only 2-3 Hz wide:

900x900px-LL-5b9bbd3a_image.jpeg

For that reason, the areas you want to attack are the broader ones that get excited by larger range of frequencies.
Quote:
And finally, equalization can help as well, but the general rule is to experiment with sub placement first.
If EQ works by just turning it on, that is what I would do. Why waste time chasing things that could be fixed there already? If you turn it on and the response is still poor, that is when I would go and mess with things that take a lot more work.
post #3742 of 9577
Quote:
Originally Posted by Saturn94 View Post

Here's the graph showing my original settings (lighter colored graph, LPF 80, HPF 100) and the best of the new settings (darker colored graph, LPF 100, HPF 75). No smoothing was applied.
900x900px-LL-5b9bbd3a_image.jpeg
Looks like you have dips around 60Hz, 120Hz, 180Hz, 240Hz, 300Hz. Some of those are above subwoofer range, so consider adding bass traps.
post #3743 of 9577
OK. Feel like I'm making some progress. Got it working with ASIO4ALL smile.gif with my new surface pro

Calibration process worked out and below are the measurements for the sub only. It's still not a flat line, but looks better

Red is without Audyssey, green with



Any comments/suggestions?

Regards

Mark
Edited by mark_anderson_u - 6/24/13 at 5:55pm
post #3744 of 9577
Quote:
Originally Posted by mark_anderson_u View Post

OK. Feel like I'm making some progress. Got it working with ASIO4ALL smile.gif with my new surface pro

Calibration process worked out and below are the measurements for the sub only. It's still not a flat line, but looks better



Any comments/suggestions?

Regards

Mark

 

 

Congratulations on getting things running.  The response isn't bad.  To really assess overall bass response, measure Left+Right+Sub(s), 15-300Hz, no smoothing.  If you use EQ, post one graph with EQ off, and one with EQ on.

 

Edit:  This also allows us to see the smoothness of the splice between the mains and the sub(s).

post #3745 of 9577
FYI, full instructions for getting REW, ASIO and HDMI working on Surface Pro are here: http://www.avsforum.com/t/1478769/rew-on-surface-pro-with-hdmi-asio4all-and-umm-6-usb-mic#post_23463548
post #3746 of 9577
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post


Congratulations on getting things running.  The response isn't bad.  To really assess overall bass response, measure Left+Right+Sub(s), 15-300Hz, no smoothing.  If you use EQ, post one graph with EQ off, and one with EQ on.

Edit:  This also allows us to see the smoothness of the splice between the mains and the sub(s).

Hmmm.. is there a way to measure LR and Sub all together (I assume that's what you mean) using ASIO?
post #3747 of 9577
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post

I went back and re-read your original postings to make sure I remembered your setup properly.  So, it looks like the response measured by the purple line has improved the serious dip at around 120Hz.  Otherwise, the two responses are still pretty close to each other.  This doesn't surprise me, because playing around with the crossover values normally doesn't help all that much.

To be honest, you should be able to improve the bass response significantly from where you are now.  The dip at 55Hz really needs to be addressed, and the 120Hz dip still isn't good.

The first recommendation, and one that doesn't cost a penny, is to leverage REW measurements to find the best location for the sub.  Move it around into every possible location and re-measure to see if you can flatten out those dips.  If that doesn't yield any improvement, the next thing to consider would be a second sub, which has proven for many people to be a good investment, if better bass is your objective.

And finally, equalization can help as well, but the general rule is to experiment with sub placement first.

I do plan to experiment with placement as much as possible. However, my placement options are very limited.

Quote:
Originally Posted by amirm View Post

Narrowband dips like the one at 55 Hz are not very audible. The way to determine audibility is to look at the probabilities. The narrower the variation, i.e. dip here, the lower the odds that something in the source will excite it and make it audible. If you look at the graph, we see the ~55 Hz dip is only 2-3 Hz wide:

900x900px-LL-5b9bbd3a_image.jpeg

For that reason, the areas you want to attack are the broader ones that get excited by larger range of frequencies.
If EQ works by just turning it on, that is what I would do. Why waste time chasing things that could be fixed there already? If you turn it on and the response is still poor, that is when I would go and mess with things that take a lot more work.

I agree about the narrow dips. My goal is good sound, not pretty graphs (although I can see why some would say they are linked). In that context, I'm not that worried about the dip at about 55hz. I'm more concerned about the broader dip around 120hz (it has improved considerably with the crossover adjustments). I'm going to try raising the LP filter to 120hz and see what happens.

This exercise is not only about seeing what improvements I can make, but also learning how different things such as crossover settings, placement, etc, affect the response.

Btw, I haven't tried experimenting with the phase control on the sub. Is there anything in my graph that suggests a phase adjustment is needed?

I greatly appreciate everyone's responses. smile.gif
post #3748 of 9577
Quote:
Originally Posted by mark_anderson_u View Post

Hmmm.. is there a way to measure LR and Sub all together (I assume that's what you mean) using ASIO?

Configure ASIO to output left and right channels. Assuming you have bass management, and your speakers are set to small, then frequencies below the crossover are automatically redirected to the sub(s).

Edit: If your system doesn't have bass management, then use the two ASIO output channels for Left+LFE, and then run a second measurement for Right+LFE.
Edited by AustinJerry - 6/24/13 at 8:11pm
post #3749 of 9577
Alright boys! Just got an email notification that the umm-6 has shipped! It be soon and I'll be asking lots of questions. I better run back through those recent Mac issues since I am running REW on a Mac.
post #3750 of 9577
Quote:
Originally Posted by mark_anderson_u View Post

OK. Feel like I'm making some progress. Got it working with ASIO4ALL smile.gif with my new surface pro

Calibration process worked out and below are the measurements for the sub only. It's still not a flat line, but looks better

Red is without Audyssey, green with



Any comments/suggestions?

Regards

Mark

 

What XO are you using?  If it's around 80Hz then the graph with EQ looks pretty reasonable.  As Jerry says, bring the L & R into play with the subs and let's see how that looks.  How does it sound?

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Audio theory, Setup and Chat

Gear mentioned in this thread:

AVS › AVS Forum › Audio › Audio theory, Setup and Chat › Simplified REW Setup and Use (USB Mic & HDMI Connection) Including Measurement Techniques and How To Interpret Graphs