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Simplified REW Setup and Use (USB Mic & HDMI Connection) Including Measurement Techniques and How... - Page 174

post #5191 of 9584
When testing the 1/4 and 3/4 points along the front tv wall. How close an my subs be to the wall with out exciting room modes?

Gear mentioned in this thread:

post #5192 of 9584
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlpowell84 View Post

When testing the 1/4 and 3/4 points along the front tv wall. How close an my subs be to the wall with out exciting room modes?

 

I my tests, the distance away from the wall was not that important.  In my current setup, the rear of the subs ar 12" from the wall, which places the front of the sub cone 30" from the wall.  You can experiment with the distance, but I doubt your measurements will show much of a difference.

post #5193 of 9584
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Fineberg View Post

ok here we go this was checked with and without audyssey....both with minidsp engaged...when its with audyssey...i EQ'd with minidsp then ran audyssey with the EQ engaged


and full range L + SW after audyssey



I like the audyssey engaged, because although there is a slight boost at the sub 20hz frequencies it is relatively flat after that...i can deal with that...thoughts?

 

Brian, I don't know if you have the measurements, but in order to assess what is going on, we should look at:

 

1-Sub without any DSP

2-Sub with MiniDSP correction

3-Sub with MiniDSP and Audyssey

4-Sub+left+right with MiniDSP and Audyssey (15-300Hz, no smoothing)

 

Also, since you are trying to assess all possible combinations, add:

 

5-Sub with Audyssey only (no MiniDSP)

6-Sub+left+right with Audyssey (no MiniDSP)

 

Only after you have analyzed all of these measurements will you be able to tell whether adding the MiniDSP is a good thing.

post #5194 of 9584
Ok, my original placement on the front wall is nearly exact to 1/4 and 3/4 points.




Here is the room. The love seat is 12 inches from the back wall but the head when sitting in the seat will be 36 inches from the back wall. An important note is I an tell a difference just by leaning forward. The bass dramatically decreases.









]

Interesting note about audyssey distance setting is the two little monitors used as mains currently are even with the front drivers of the Submersives. Heck the back wall is only another 2 ft 6 inches. But it's more about timing I Bellevue than true physical distance with Audyssey
post #5195 of 9584
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlpowell84 View Post

Ok guys. I have the night to measure. So my plan is. Get the furniture sliders under my two Submersives. And then measure 4-5 different placements. So when doing this I am a little confused. What if one is closer than the other? Should I then level match them with my spl meter from the MLP? To acheive that I would have to use the gain on the plate amp or I could hook up my mini dsp and use that as I can control gain from the in increments of 1db.

I then plan to run audyssey from the best position, perhaps second best if it's not far behind and I like the aesthetics better. I am really hoping 1/4 and 3/4 on the from wall will be good. I will then measure with audyssey on an off to provide graphs.

I will pay attention to have graphs similar. I will go from 5 hz just for the fun of seeing what's down there.

Note: I don't plan on doing much speaker stuff since I have a couple surrounds there now as I am waiting on two 8" JBL woofer rebuilds and I will then implement a 4 speaker 2 sub setup until spring time.

All recommendations welcomed. I will be there to setup in about an hour smile.gifsmile.gifsmile.gif

 

I don't recall--do you have Audyssey MultEQ XT32 with Sub EQ HT?  If not, then keeping the subs equidistant from the MLP Becomes more important.

 

If you are measuring before running Audyssey, I would adjust the sub distances as you move them around.

 

Once you have a candidate for "best location", run a quick 3-position calibration and do some preliminary measurements:

 

- Subs only, 5-300Hz, no smoothing

- Subs+mains, 5-300Hz, no smoothing

 

If everything looks good, then run the full 8-position calibration.  If something doesn't look good, try another position and repeat the process.

post #5196 of 9584
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlpowell84 View Post

Ok, my original placement on the front wall is nearly exact to 1/4 and 3/4 points.


Here is the room. The love seat is 12 inches from the back wall but the head when sitting in the seat will be 36 inches from the back wall. An important note is I an tell a difference just by leaning forward. The bass dramatically decreases.


Interesting note about audyssey distance setting is the two little monitors used as mains currently are even with the front drivers of the Submersives. Heck the back wall is only another 2 ft 6 inches. But it's more about timing I Bellevue than true physical distance with Audyssey

 

The shape of the room looks to be somewhat challenging.  I see two small monitos on the shelf under the flat panel, and then two other enclosures on the outside of the subs that look to be missing a low frequency driver.  Are the small monitors your left and right front speakers?  Where is the center channel?  What are the other two enclosures?

 

The difference in distances between subs and mains is perfectly normal.  A sub's amp has some internal delay, which is compensated for by adding a small amount to the sub's distance.

 

And moving your head around can affect bass response, because you could be moving into or out of a room mode.  If you feel the need to take advantage of the increased bass, move your MLP forward.  Remember, finding the best bass response is not only finding the best positions for the subs, but also finding the best spot for the MLP.  Test different potential MLP locations by simply moving the measurement mic forward or backward, being careful not to get too close to the back wall.

post #5197 of 9584
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post

The shape of the room looks to be somewhat challenging.  I see two small monitos on the shelf under the flat panel, and then two other enclosures on the outside of the subs that look to be missing a low frequency driver.  Are the small monitors your left and right front speakers?  Where is the center channel?  What are the other two enclosures?

The difference in distances between subs and mains is perfectly normal.  A sub's amp has some internal delay, which is compensated for by adding a small amount to the sub's distance.

And moving your head around can affect bass response, because you could be moving into or out of a room mode.  If you feel the need to take advantage of the increased bass, move your MLP forward.  Remember, finding the best bass response is not only finding the best positions for the subs, but also finding the best spot for the MLP.  Test different potential MLP locations by simply moving the measurement mic forward or backward, being careful not to get too close to the back wall.

Yes the two small monitors are the only speakers at the moment. The JBL towers are having the 8" drivers rebuilt. I should get them by Friday. So I will be running a 4 speaker 2 sub system until spring when I will get some JTR speakers. Phantom center for a little while. Btw the bass decreases farther forward. Probably because boundary gain decrease and a null. It actually doesn't pick back up until you get about 3 ft from the subs
Also I have a Denon 3313 so only XT. But I was saying earlier I can use the time delay with the mini dsp as each sub can have its own channel. This gives me placement flexibility right?
post #5198 of 9584
Yes, I think so. I am not familiar with the capabilities of the MiniiDSP.

Bedtime for me. Good luck with your tests.
post #5199 of 9584
Graphs in less than 20...
post #5200 of 9584
Ok, so I did several measurement with the subs on the front wall. I didn't get to any other positions as I was taking longer than expected. I tried my best to remember all the instruction and graphs are from 5-300 or 5-20000. 1/6 smoothing for full sweeps are titled pictures of the graphs.





This was after I only did one to check sub levels to make sure they were acceptable. I got a little excited and though, "sell the mini dsp and return the furniture sliders!!!"


I figured it would be good to measure with the ottoman there. Seems to help! Natural treatment smile.gif




post #5201 of 9584
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlpowell84 View Post

Ok, my original placement on the front wall is nearly exact to 1/4 and 3/4 points.

Doesn't look like it from the pic.

Your "room width" stretches from the wall next to your right speaker to the wall behind your kitchen sink. That's not 11'6". Sound waves don't know that you're only using part of that space.

Since your couch is already 12 inches from the back wall, I would move it a few more inches away and slide the subs back there.
post #5202 of 9584
Quote:
Originally Posted by sdurani View Post

Doesn't look like it from the pic.

Your "room width" stretches from the wall next to your right speaker to the wall behind your kitchen sink. That's not 11'6". Sound waves don't know that you're only using part of that space.

Since your couch is already 12 inches from the back wall, I would move it a few more inches away and slide the subs back there.

Ok I get ya. Wow I feel so elementary in realization of your answer smile.gif my next try is behind and on either side of the couch. That dip at 67 hz and beyond is too much for the dsp to bring up. I did forget to change the submersives back to program 2 witch would give 50hz down a small rise. It was fun but I had to cut short with a headache. I can get more tomm early afternoon. Ima try both of those near field locations. So I'm just thinking with near field there won't be any cancellation issues right? Or perhaps a better question, what are the issues associated with near field placement?
Edited by jlpowell84 - 10/12/13 at 10:45pm
post #5203 of 9584
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlpowell84 View Post

So I'm just thinking with near field there won't be any cancellation issues right? Or perhaps a better question, what are the issues associated with near field placement?
There's nothing fancy happening acoustically with nearfield placement, you just hear more of your subs and less of your room.

BTW, how long is your room (front to back)?
post #5204 of 9584
Quote:
Originally Posted by sdurani View Post

There's nothing fancy happening acoustically with nearfield placement, you just hear more of your subs and less of your room.

BTW, how long is your room (front to back)?

You know I forgot to measure it. I will tomm:). It is cortect to say I am having cancellation currently at 67hz above with that nasty drop right?
post #5205 of 9584
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlpowell84 View Post

It is cortect to say I am having cancellation currently at 67hz above with that nasty drop right?
Looks like a cancellation, centered around 70Hz (± 2 Hz, depending on which measurement you're looking at).

If I divide the speed of sound by the frequency of the null, I should get the approximate room dimension that's causing it.

1130 ÷ 70 = 16 (give or take a foot).

The dip means you're within a foot or so of the quarter point of that dimension. If you were at the quarter point, it would be even worse (deeper null).
post #5206 of 9584
That could be pretty close. I'll measure tomm for sure. I would have already but I'm not there tonight smile.gif
post #5207 of 9584
No rush. I'm up late and doing back-of-the-napkin calculations. My guess could be way off.
post #5208 of 9584
Quote:
Originally Posted by sdrucker View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlpowell84 View Post

Very nice sir !

Only question, Keith: with your Submersives, can you _tell_ the difference between flat @ 10 Hz and a few db down at 7 Hz? And have you found any source material than can demonstrate the difference between 10 and 7 Hz ULF?

biggrin.gif

 

IDK if I can tell the difference because I don't have a spectrum analyser running when I am watching a movie <:)> so IDK if the content is 10H or 7Hz or any other Hz specifically. WOTW pod escape scene has bass content into single figures, as do some other movies listed on the bass-forum site. Personally, I don't think there is much sense in relentlessly pursuing a flat response into single figures, or even a flat response below 20Hz really - it's just that with the Submersives, you get it without really trying.

post #5209 of 9584
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post
 

If you are measuring before running Audyssey, I would adjust the sub distances as you move them around.

 

 

Jerry, can you elaborate on that please?  I can't quite see why the delay setting is important when all one is doing is trying to find the best place for the sub in the room - the place where the sub-room interaction is the best.

post #5210 of 9584
Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post

 
If you are measuring before running Audyssey, I would adjust the sub distances as you move them around.

Jerry, can you elaborate on that please?  I can't quite see why the delay setting is important when all one is doing is trying to find the best place for the sub in the room - the place where the sub-room interaction is the best.
The sub delay is usually a constant, i.e. if the subs are physically 10' away, and Audyssey measures the direct wave and sets the distance delay at 17', if you move the sub 2' closer to 8' (physically measured) away from the MLP, the Audyssey measured delay should now read 15'.

If there's only one sub, then you could just use the RTA with the mic at the MLP and slide the sub around till you find a decently flat response. Check the response at several other Mic positions (the more similar the FR at different mic positions, the easier for EQ to correct all the anomalies).

With 2 or more subs though, moving the subs alters the delay between them, i.e. you're potentially subjecting the measured response to phase cancellation issues between the subs unless you change the distances so the direct wave from each sub arrives at the same time. This of course, is only valid if the user can set individual distances/delays for each sub.

If, on the other hand, the avr does NOT have SubEQ HT, and both subs are fed the same signal, then there's no need to change any distances. Just slide them around till the optimal positions are found, then run the calibration to set trims and delays (and measure the response to see if the distance tweak helps).


Max
post #5211 of 9584
Quote:
Originally Posted by djbluemax1 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AustinJerry View Post

 
If you are measuring before running Audyssey, I would adjust the sub distances as you move them around.

Jerry, can you elaborate on that please?  I can't quite see why the delay setting is important when all one is doing is trying to find the best place for the sub in the room - the place where the sub-room interaction is the best.
The sub delay is usually a constant, i.e. if the subs are physically 10' away, and Audyssey measures the direct wave and sets the distance delay at 17', if you move the sub 2' closer to 8' (physically measured) away from the MLP, the Audyssey measured delay should now read 15'.
 

 

I'm still not understanding this, Max. What has Audyssey got to do with finding the optimum place in the room for the sub?

 

 

Quote:
 If there's only one sub, then you could just use the RTA with the mic at the MLP and slide the sub around till you find a decently flat response. Check the response at several other Mic positions (the more similar the FR at different mic positions, the easier for EQ to correct all the anomalies).

With 2 or more subs though, moving the subs alters the delay between them, i.e. you're potentially subjecting the measured response to phase cancellation issues between the subs unless you change the distances so the direct wave from each sub arrives at the same time. This of course, is only valid if the user can set individual distances/delays for each sub.

If, on the other hand, the avr does NOT have SubEQ HT, and both subs are fed the same signal, then there's no need to change any distances. Just slide them around till the optimal positions are found, then run the calibration to set trims and delays (and measure the response to see if the distance tweak helps).

 

Ah - it's clicked now with your middle paragraph above. Trying to optimise the placement of TWO subs in the room. Yes, got that, thanks. I was thinking 'single sub'. So to summarise: one sub, no need to futz with the delays; two subs, futzing is required (unless the two are Y-corded and treated as one). Got it. Thanks.

post #5212 of 9584
Although last night while measuring i noticed i had a peak around the xo and a null right after it (not huge but about 10db each). So i did trial and error with the sub distances and it rrduced them both (i have only one sub)
post #5213 of 9584
Quote:
Originally Posted by kbarnes701 View Post
 

 

Jerry, can you elaborate on that please?  I can't quite see why the delay setting is important when all one is doing is trying to find the best place for the sub in the room - the place where the sub-room interaction is the best.

 

What Max said.  :)

post #5214 of 9584
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Fineberg View Post

Although last night while measuring i noticed i had a peak around the xo and a null right after it (not huge but about 10db each). So i did trial and error with the sub distances and it rrduced them both (i have only one sub)

The sub distance tweak is used to improve the interaction between your mains and sub since Audyssey never measures the combined response. Based on the last post from Max, it sounds like changing the distance setting when trying to find an optimal location for a single sub does not add any value since only the sub is playing.
post #5215 of 9584
Quote:
Originally Posted by djbluemax1 View Post

The sub delay is usually a constant, i.e. if the subs are physically 10' away, and Audyssey measures the direct wave and sets the distance delay at 17', if you move the sub 2' closer to 8' (physically measured) away from the MLP, the Audyssey measured delay should now read 15'.

If there's only one sub, then you could just use the RTA with the mic at the MLP and slide the sub around till you find a decently flat response. Check the response at several other Mic positions (the more similar the FR at different mic positions, the easier for EQ to correct all the anomalies).

With 2 or more subs though, moving the subs alters the delay between them, i.e. you're potentially subjecting the measured response to phase cancellation issues between the subs unless you change the distances so the direct wave from each sub arrives at the same time. This of course, is only valid if the user can set individual distances/delays for each sub.

If, on the other hand, the avr does NOT have SubEQ HT, and both subs are fed the same signal, then there's no need to change any distances. Just slide them around till the optimal positions are found, then run the calibration to set trims and delays (and measure the response to see if the distance tweak helps).


Max

I'm a little confused here. If you can set delays it is important that the waves arrive at the same time because of cancellation right? I totally understand that. But then you say, "
If, on the other hand, the avr does NOT have SubEQ HT, and both subs are fed the same signal, then there's no need to change any distances. Just slide them around till the optimal positions are found, then run the calibration to set trims and delays (and measure the response to see if the distance tweak helps)."

Here I am reading there is no need to change distances. I am getting contradictory info here. I know your not giving contradictory info so please help me understand.

I only have multi eq XT and no sub eq ht. But I have a mini dsp that can set individual time delays for each sub as I can have each one on its own channel. With math I can figure out each delay as sound travels 1130ft a second (would have to double check that number) So if I am going to have my two subs placed non equidistant then I would need to take this approach before I measure so that each sub volume and time delay are both identical to the MLP correct?

Step one: sit in the MLP with my spl meter and make sure each sub plays the same volume individually to the MLP. Set one sub with the other off then repeat for the second. Example, if one sub is 5 ft away and the other is 12 ft away then the 12 ft away sub will need a little more volume.

Step two: I would need to calculate mathematically the appropriate time delay for each sub. Not sure of the formula but I can look at the info and create a mathematical formula. This is very important so that the sound and waves from each sub arrives in an identical time to the MLP.

Let me know if that process is right. If equidistant then simy match sub volume to the MLP and then measure.

This is the interface I have to work with on the mini dsp smile.gif
post #5216 of 9584
Quote:
Originally Posted by jlpowell84 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by djbluemax1 View Post

The sub delay is usually a constant, i.e. if the subs are physically 10' away, and Audyssey umeasures the direct wave and sets the distance delay at 17', if you move the sub 2' closer to 8' (physically measured) away from the MLP, the Audyssey measured delay should now read 15'.

If there's only one sub, then you could just use the RTA with the mic at the MLP and slide the sub around till you find a decently flat response. Check the response at several other Mic positions (the more similar the FR at different mic positions, the easier for EQ to correct all the anomalies).

With 2 or more subs though, moving the subs alters the delay between them, i.e. you're potentially subjecting the measured response to phase cancellation issues between the subs unless you change the distances so the direct wave from each sub arrives at the same time. This of course, is only valid if the user can set individual distances/delays for each sub.

If, on the other hand, the avr does NOT have SubEQ HT, and both subs are fed the same signal, then there's no need to change any distances. Just slide them around till the optimal positions are found, then run the calibration to set trims and delays (and measure the response to see if the distance tweak helps).


Max

I'm a little confused here. If you can set delays it is important that the waves arrive at the same time because of cancellation right? I totally understand that. But then you say, "
If, on the other hand, the avr does NOT have SubEQ HT, and both subs are fed the same signal, then there's no need to change any distances. Just slide them around till the optimal positions are found, then run the calibration to set trims and delays (and measure the response to see if the distance tweak helps)."

Here I am reading there is no need to change distances. I am getting contradictory info here. I know your not giving contradictory info so please help me understand.

I only have multi eq XT and no sub eq ht. But I have a mini dsp that can set individual time delays for each sub as I can have each one on its own channel. With math I can figure out each delay as sound travels 1130ft a second (would have to double check that number) So if I am going to have my two subs placed non equidistant then I would need to take this approach before I measure so that each sub volume and time delay are both identical to the MLP correct?

Step one: sit in the MLP with my spl meter and make sure each sub plays the same volume individually to the MLP. Set one sub with the other off then repeat for the second. Example, if one sub is 5 ft away and the other is 12 ft away then the 12 ft away sub will need a little more volume.

Step two: I would need to calculate mathematically the appropriate time delay for each sub. Not sure of the formula but I can look at the info and create a mathematical formula. This is very important so that the sound and waves from each sub arrives in an identical time to the MLP.

Let me know if that process is right. If equidistant then simy match sub volume to the MLP and then measure.

This is the interface I have to work with on the mini dsp smile.gif
Whoops, I'll try to be a little clearer.

A) one of the most effective things you can do is to find the optimal locations for your sub(s) in your own room. The most effective way to do that is to use measurement equipment, to measure ONLY the subs from 15 to 200-300Hz with no EQ whatsoever while moving the subs around.

B) For folks with 2 (or more) subs with NO ability whatsoever to adjust individual sub delays, just move and measure, move and measure. Use painter's tape or something to mark and note the positions that produce the best subwoofer frequency response. When you have 3-4 placements (both subs combined), measure each one at several mic placements. The sub placements that show the closest similarity in the graphs with different mic placements with no significant nulls is the best placement even if the graphs are not as flat. When the graphs are more similar even with different mic placements, one EQ set can correct all the common anomalies that are not nulls.

C) You OTOH, do have the ability to set individual delays. The simplest way to do this is to place both subs a measured equal distance away from the MLP (eg. equilateral triangle). Note that distance. Turn off one sub, then run the minimum calibration to see what distance/delay settings the avr/Audyssey measures. Note it down. Repeat with the other sub on its own. This is to determine 2 things: 1) the internal delay in the subs. 2) is the internal delay the same for both subs? You can't simply calculate the delay based solely on distance because you don't know the internal delay of the sub(s).

D) once you've determined the internal delay of the subs (eg. if the subs are measured 10' away and Audyssey produces a 17' distance, you know the sub's delay is adding the extra 7'), you can add one additional step before proceeding. The extra optional step is to move 1' closer and run another minimum calibration. The results should show that 1' reduction in distance.

E) now run the RTA and start sliding the subs around. DON'T forget to turn Audyssey OFF while doing this. You're looking for the best pre-EQ response to start from before actually calibrating/EQ'ing. Begin with Sanjay's placement recommendations. When you move the subs, adjust the distances/delays based on the internal delays measured from Steps C&D above.

F) once you've determined the optimal locations, run a full Audyssey calibration with the speakers in the system.

G) measure the L+SUBS, R+SUBS, C+SUBS and L+R+SUBS. Examine the crossover region. If it's pretty much flat, whoopie, you're done with this part. If there's a dip in the crossover region, note the sub distance and delay settings in all your devices, then use the sub distance tweak to adjust the sub distances and delays to see if you can smooth out the crossover dip.


Max
Edited by djbluemax1 - 10/13/13 at 12:07pm
post #5217 of 9584
Ha! Super ingenious way to physically measure the distance if you have a Submersive and are by yourself. If you get the end of the tape measure close to the bottom corner magnet it will grap it. And if it's a small light tape measure (the line) you can get a straight line. Now I have the tip of the Audyssey mic exactly the same distance. I am checking to see if the internal delays match with distance settings one sub at a time. Report back soon
post #5218 of 9584
Ok one sub measured 16.2 ft and the other 16.4 ft. They are physically about 10ft 10 inches away and increased from the previous 12ft 8 inches with the mini dsp in the signal chain. I can disable all eq and just pass the signal. I just wanted to get it installed.
post #5219 of 9584
Quote:
Originally Posted by djbluemax1 View Post

Whoops, I'll try to be a little clearer.

A) one of the most effective things you can do is to find the optimal locations for your sub(s) in your own room. The most effective way to do that is to use measurement equipment, to measure ONLY the subs from 15 to 200-300Hz with no EQ whatsoever while moving the subs around.

B) For folks with 2 (or more) subs with NO ability whatsoever to adjust individual sub delays, just move and measure, move and measure. Use painter's tape or something to mark and note the positions that produce the best subwoofer frequency response. When you have 3-4 placements (both subs combined), measure each one at several mic placements. The sub placements that show the closest similarity in the graphs with different mic placements with no significant nulls is the best placement even if the graphs are not as flat. When the graphs are more similar even with different mic placements, one EQ set can correct all the common anomalies that are not nulls.

C) You OTOH, do have the ability to set individual delays. The simplest way to do this is to place both subs a measured equal distance away from the MLP (eg. equilateral triangle). Note that distance. Turn off one sub, then run the minimum calibration to see what distance/delay settings the avr/Audyssey measures. Note it down. Repeat with the other sub on its own. This is to determine 2 things: 1) the internal delay in the subs. 2) is the internal delay the same for both subs? You can't simply calculate the delay based solely on distance because you don't know the internal delay of the sub(s).

D) once you've determined the internal delay of the subs (eg. if the subs are measured 10' away and Audyssey produces a 17' distance, you know the sub's delay is adding the extra 7'), you can add one additional step before proceeding. The extra optional step is to move 1' closer and run another minimum calibration. The results should show that 1' reduction in distance.

E) now run the RTA and start sliding the subs around. DON'T forget to turn Audyssey OFF while doing this. You're looking for the best pre-EQ response to start from before actually calibrating/EQ'ing. Begin with Sanjay's placement recommendations. When you move the subs, adjust the distances/delays based on the internal delays measured from Steps C&D above.

F) once you've determined the optimal locations, run a full Audyssey calibration with the speakers in the system.

G) measure the L+SUBS, R+SUBS, C+SUBS and L+R+SUBS. Examine the crossover region. If it's pretty much flat, whoopie, you're done with this part. If there's a dip in the crossover region, note the sub distance and delay settings in all your devices, then use the sub distance tweak to adjust the sub distances and delays to see if you can smooth out the crossover dip.


Max

Thanks for this info Max. I will dissect all of it and hopefully here in the near future we will find the best placement and EQ combo.
post #5220 of 9584
I didn't get everything accomplished as I got distracted playing with the mini dsp interface. I was hoping to try and take my existing sub placement and add some mini dsp eq and then simply run audyssey and then measure with the mini dsp engaged and then one with it disabled. Before that I tested the internal time delay by setting the exact (within 1/8 inch) physical distance of the subs to the tip of the audyssey mic. I got 16.2 ft and 16.4 ft. I ran several audyssey one mic measurements to get each individual sub the same volume. I had to turn my gain up quite a bit on my Submersives to get a -1.0db and a -1.5db. So it seems the mini dsp is affecting the gain. I will ask Mark about that. I ran audyssey and got a much better graph today as opposed to yesterday. I will post comparisons. But the stumbling block and time consumer came with trying to figure why my mini dsp changes were unresponsive after I ran audyssey. Before, right after I hooked it up, I could go to 55hz for example and click up on the gain in 0.5 db increments. And a definitive response was audibly noticed as I had music playing. Or I could use the gain control on the mini dsp interface and the subs would respond. Or I could hit the mute buttons and the subs would mute. Anyway after I ran audyssey I got zero response there after from my mini dsp window/interface. But that's a problem for another forum.

The weird thing is while my previous audyssey calibration was engaged and I plugged in the dsp in the signal chain at first I didn't have the gain on the sub up. Now it's like 10 clicks up

Anyway here is yesterday's run to today's.





Oh yea the only difference is I put the big ottoman in front of our giant love seat...
Edited by jlpowell84 - 10/13/13 at 5:25pm
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AVS › AVS Forum › Audio › Audio theory, Setup and Chat › Simplified REW Setup and Use (USB Mic & HDMI Connection) Including Measurement Techniques and How To Interpret Graphs