or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Comments to Improve Network

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
This past weekend I spent time running some Cat 5e to the master bedroom, 4th bedroom (toy room), living room and office. I have it all wired together in our coat closet down stairs hooked up to a Cable Modem (brand escapes me at the moment as I'm at work) which is hooked into a Linksys e4200 Router which is then hooked into a Gigbit Prosafe netgear switch. The switch then feeds all the rooms in the house.

The desktop in the office houses all the movies, tv shows, music which is until I get a dedicated NAS device. The living room has a HTPC which is running Media Center with Media Browser and is the main source of watching TV shows and movies. I have a WD Live in the master bedroom which is also pointing to the office computer to watch recorded TV shows and Movies. I was thinking about purchasing a Dune or Meed8er box to replace the WD Live in the master and move the WD Live into the 4th bedroom for the kids. If all three locations (master, toy room, living room) are watching a movie will things play ok or will I need a beefier router/switch?

Thanks
post #2 of 7
If everything is connected via the gigabit switch, you should be in good shape. No reason to change anything. If you don't have enough ports on your switch, you can add another.
post #3 of 7
Thread Starter 
Yes everything will be hooked up to the gigabit switch. Thank you for your help. Just wanted a second opinion.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I747 using Tapatalk 2
post #4 of 7
I am using cat6 cables. On an average, I am getting 300Mbps and 300 - 350 Mbps on large file transfers.
business phones
Edited by LauraClrk - 1/8/13 at 4:07am
post #5 of 7
jr, I don't wish to hijack the topic, but I have a couple of questions regarding networking. My home was "smart wired" meaning I also have a central box in the hall closet with all cable/sat cable, telephone and cat 5 wall connections located here. I have a Motorola Surfboard Model SB5100 modem (CableOne approved) and a D-Link Model DGL-4100 router with ethernet connections to 2 office PC's, 1 TV (Master bedroom) and 1 outlet connection behind entertainment center for gaming console.

1. Since the router is used to connect each of the room Cat 5 outlets, what is the purpose/need for the Gigbit prosafe netgear switch? Isn't this a redundant function of the router?
2. I recently updated much of my audio/video equipment. All now have ethernet connections for firmware updating, video/audio streaming, photo share, etc., however, I only have 1 Cat 5 wall connection. The question is, what device do I use between the 1 Cat 5 wall connection and the 4 ethernet capable audio/video/gaming devices? Currently using the outlet to connect the gaming console.
post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fenix66d View Post

jr, I don't wish to hijack the topic, but I have a couple of questions regarding networking. My home was "smart wired" meaning I also have a central box in the hall closet with all cable/sat cable, telephone and cat 5 wall connections located here. I have a Motorola Surfboard Model SB5100 modem (CableOne approved) and a D-Link Model DGL-4100 router with ethernet connections to 2 office PC's, 1 TV (Master bedroom) and 1 outlet connection behind entertainment center for gaming console.

1. Since the router is used to connect each of the room Cat 5 outlets, what is the purpose/need for the Gigbit prosafe netgear switch? Isn't this a redundant function of the router?
2. I recently updated much of my audio/video equipment. All now have ethernet connections for firmware updating, video/audio streaming, photo share, etc., however, I only have 1 Cat 5 wall connection. The question is, what device do I use between the 1 Cat 5 wall connection and the 4 ethernet capable audio/video/gaming devices? Currently using the outlet to connect the gaming console.

1. To give you more ports. Typically a SOHO router, like your DGL-4100, has 4 Ethernet LAN ports on it. Using an external switch can give you 8, 16, or more ports.

2. You would need a switch connected in the room with your A/V components. It will fan out the 1 port into however many ports the added switch has free.

Now, when you link two switches together to give you more ports, i.e. stack an 8 port switch to the 4 ethernet ports (aka a switch) built into your Soho Router to get 10 usable ports for devices, you introduce a bottle neck between the switches, as all the PC's and other equipment on switch #1 will have to use that 1 wire to communicate with the devices connected to switch #2. PC's surfing the internet or doing very little across the network wont notice it. But If you intend to copy large files, or stream video on multiple devices on different switches, you'll see a slow down. Example: In a setup where PC#1 in Bedroom #1 is connected to router's Port1, Media Server in closet connected to Port2 on router, a switch in office connected through the wall to port 3 on the router, and you have an Office PC and office Laptop connected to the switch. The Office PC and Office Laptop will have to SHARE the 1Gbps link between the switch and router. So when you try to copy files between the Office PC and PC#1 at the same time you are trying to stream a movie from the Media server on the office Laptop, you'll notice the slow down. Either the file copy will take much longer, or the video might get jerky/choppy or stall. You might even notice the office laptop's internet slow down if you are trying to stream a movie from the media server on the office PC.
post #7 of 7
Mark_Venture, thank-you for your response. I believe I now understand what's needed.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home