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Sony is Launching "Mastered in 4K" Blu-rays for UHDTV Upscaling - Page 2

post #31 of 76
Should be called "Bend over and take it"!!!
post #32 of 76
For those that have 2.35:1 setups, releasing the films in a native 16:9 anamorphic widescreeen format vs. having a digital vertical stretch is the thing I would like to see as a true resolution enhancement for native 1080p systems. Of course a native 4K 2.35:1 image would be the ultimate goal, but there would certainly be storage issues to work out with an even higher data density Bluray for that resolution and aspect ratio. Any manipulation of a 4K image through digital interpolation and optical stretching is sure to have undesirable effects.
post #33 of 76
Again Superbit all over. It was apparent watching Superbit on larger displays that the quality of the video on the disc was slightly better. But the question became, why can't you just put that effort into all your DVD releases? Here's our half-@ss version, if you want quality you have to pay another $10.
post #34 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Susilo View Post

The Sony rep I talked to mentioned that the difference will be "quite apparent" (his words) when you upscale it to 4K. For 2K display it shouldn't make much of a difference if at all unless you're using projection (again, my paraphrasing of what he said).

I am sure the rep was repeating what the marketing material told him to say. I am sure it is quite apparant just like buying a high end power cord brings untold improvements to your AV system.
post #35 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by David Susilo View Post

The Sony rep I talked to mentioned that the difference will be "quite apparent" (his words) when you upscale it to 4K. For 2K display it shouldn't make much of a difference if at all unless you're using projection (again, my paraphrasing of what he said).

The key word here is rep. What you are hearing is typically called spin. Reminds of the BS back when HD DVD failed and the Toshiba supporters that took it hard decided not to BD because their Toshiba HD DVD players were so good they could make a DVD (~350k pixels) look close to a HD disc (2M pixels).

Their is no way any algorithm is going to magically make a 2M pixel format, BD/HD, look like it originally contained 8M pixel. Its simple scaling and smoothing.

Pretty much what I saw coming down the pipe when UHD/4K was announced and there is no easy way of getting native content. This is exactly what the CE makers were doing when HD sets got here and there was little HD content available. Their standard line was "It makes standard def look like high def"
post #36 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Devedander View Post

So this is the new supetbit...


This ^^^^^
post #37 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by sodaboy581 View Post

So, basically, they're trying to get people to buy what they should have pressed on the original Blu-Ray discs to begin with?

I mean, I'm sure the old versions of these Blu-Ray discs were authored using masters of these movies that were already 4K or higher. (They don't shoot movies in 1080P.) But, THIS TIME, they'll be upping the bit rate on what they're pressing to disc while keeping the same old 1080P resolution.

The clever way Sony words things, though, I bet they will confuse people into thinking they're buying a 4K version of the movie on a Blu-Ray. And, because of the higher bit rate, people will be tricked into believing it. So sad! Even on an Ultra HD TV, it's still just going to be upscaled 1080P.

Some movies are indeed shot in 1080p. Star Wars Ep 1 is one of them using at the time state of the art 1080P digital cameras.
post #38 of 76
Yes, from 1999 to about 2003 standard 24P HDTV equipment was used for a few features. Sony was the first with 1080P/24 cameras but that's pretty much dead technology today.
post #39 of 76
Sony is supplying a small server to feed 4K movies to the TV. It is already loaded with native 4K movies, 10 titles. Soon they plan to offer more you can download to that server. One rep I spoke with said they were still discussing if there will be a program where, if you have the 2K BluRay, and purchase the Sony 4K TV, you may be able to get the 4K version for free as a bonus for buying Sony. But, basically, they don't have a firm game plan yet. It's all too new.
Edited by Don Landis - 1/13/13 at 11:41am
post #40 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Landis View Post

Sony is supplying a small server to feed 4K movies to the TV. It is already loaded with native 4K movies, 10 titles. Soon they plan to offer more you can download to that server. One rep I spoke with said they were still discussing if there will be a program where, if you have the 2K BluRay, and purchase the Sony 4K TV, you may be able to get the 4K version for free as a bonus for buying Sony. But, basically, they don't have a firm game plan yet. It's all too knew.

So much negative comments!! On a 10 foot wide screen I welcome true 4K : or better yet 8K but I sure won't be re-buying movies again, my Blu Ray collection is over 500 Blu Ray now smile.gif at an average of $14 a pop $7000 to the movie studios eek.gif
post #41 of 76
how much will these newly mastered Blu-ray's cost?...that will probably be the determining factor for most
post #42 of 76
"Thank you sir for a lesser quality blu-ray, may I buy another that is better now"
post #43 of 76
BDXL could work real nice in this situation, sad that I don't think there are any home blu ray players that can playback BDXL disc's in the USA
post #44 of 76
There is no doubt that a less compressed video stream will look better than a more heavily compressed one when upscaled, since artifacts become more apparent when blown up. The question is also "how much better will they look" and "why didn't they max out the media's capacity the first time". The age of portable discs is coming to an end anyway and the move to media that doesn't fail in the face of a slight scratch will be welcome by me. How will studios be able to resell movies in format after format when you buy digital rights to the work? That is certainly a disincentive for them at this point.
post #45 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Reddig View Post

Some movies are indeed shot in 1080p. Star Wars Ep 1 is one of them using at the time state of the art 1080P digital cameras.

I think you mean episode 2. Episode 1 was filmed in 35mm. Episode 2 was actually filmed digitally in slightly less than 1080p and episode 3 was filmed in 1080p. Both of those movies will have to be upscaled if ever released on a 4k format eek.gif Hell, episode 2 on blu ray technically is upscaled a bit. It looked okay the one time I scanned through it though (I can't sit down and watch any of those prequels start to finish anymore, they get worse and worse each time. lol) Pretty shortsided by Mr Lucas if you ask me.
Edited by chadsdsmith - 1/13/13 at 11:48am
post #46 of 76
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gigabyte

The above does a good job of explaining the difference between GB gigabyte and gb gigabit fairly well
post #47 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by greylight44 View Post



HELP ME!

Hahaha exactly how I felt reading this thread biggrin.gif
post #48 of 76
The problem here is that the discs are still going to be 4:2:0 8 bit 1080p masters. The movies mentioned already had 4K DIs so they should be the same. Sony has already been using an improved process for going from 4:4:4 to 4:2:0 for quite some time already, so I doubt this will be any different than what they are using already. The only way these will really improve is if they were bit starved to begin with, which I don't think has ever been an issue with Sony Blu-ray releases. I doubt these will look much better at all, but I'll more than happily eat crow if Sony can actually do something more with the Blu-ray spec and have a higher bit depth for their BD releases and more true chroma resolution.
post #49 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by chadsdsmith View Post

I think you mean episode 2. Episode 1 was filmed in 35mm. Episode 2 was actually filmed digitally in slightly less than 1080p and episode 3 was filmed in 1080p. Both of those movies will have to be upscaled if ever released on a 4k format eek.gif Hell, episode 2 on blu ray technically is upscaled a bit. It looked okay the one time I scanned through it though (I can't sit down and watch any of those prequels start to finish anymore, they get worse and worse each time. lol) Pretty shortsided by Mr Lucas if you ask me.

Yes your correct it was Ep II that he started using Digital cameras. Thanks for clearing that up. Yes correct since these were shot in 1080 theres no way to do a 4K scan from the original like with film other than an upconversion. I think George did it mostly for the convineince and the fact that he loved state of the art stuff.
post #50 of 76
I remember buying Labyrinth on "superbit " and the DTS track was out of sync by a regular mile

I hear Ghostbusters on the 4k Mastered Range is said to look a lot better probably more because they did such a screw up with the original release
post #51 of 76
Just another way to take your money. I didn't know P. T. Barnum was the new president of Sony.
post #52 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by olyteddy View Post

Just another way to take your money. I didn't know P. T. Barnum was the new president of Sony.

Taking people's money is the foundation of capitalism and the main reason cool stuff exists.

post #53 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagic View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by olyteddy View Post

Just another way to take your money. I didn't know P. T. Barnum was the new president of Sony.
Taking people's money is the foundation of capitalism and the main reason cool stuff exists.
And a re-release of a re-released movie is cool?
post #54 of 76
These disks will be put through the microscope.........if Sony don't deliver a visually superior end result to their standard bit rate sibling/s, it will be a marketing disaster.
post #55 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Highjinx View Post

These disks will be put through the microscope.........if Sony don't deliver a visually superior end result to their standard bit rate sibling/s, it will be a marketing disaster.

As usual, I don't think they will deliver 1080p is 1080p, now when we get real 4K then that's an other story smile.gif
post #56 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by olyteddy View Post


And a re-release of a re-released movie is cool?

If it is an improvement that brings the viewer closer to the original film's quality then sure. Top Gun 3D was great and a clear improvement over the previous version. So were the discs in the Alien Anthology Blu-ray release. Buying something again is just a choice, people can keep their old copy and re-watch that, too. If the new version is better then some folks who appreciate watching their favorite films in the best possible quality presentation will find value in a re-release.

post #57 of 76
Amen to 4k remaster LOA
post #58 of 76
Is the LOA a 4K remaster already?
post #59 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Avliner View Post

Is the LOA a 4K remaster already?

Well, never mind, as I just got mine yesterday it is a 4K remastering though and what a fantastic restoring/remastering job they've done; just incredible!!
post #60 of 76
Kindly refer to my findings re: mastered in 4K discs on the other thread.
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