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RG-6/U cable question

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Hello,

We just bought our first house. The house was built in 1994-95. I asked comcast to come over and help me install a line in the one room. They could not do it cause they only do one-level houses. Anything above that, needs to have a electrician or DIY.
So the one cable in our master had no f connector on it. So he put one on and said this does not look good. We went to the basement, then found out that the bedroom cable was cut down there as well. The big thing he noticed was the wire. He made it like a crime saying that he could shut us down cause that wire is not up-to-code to handle todays signals. Even though my HD looks good on TV, and my internet is fast. But I do want to replace it anyhow.
The cable I saw at Home Depot is made by southwire which was part of another company in which I forget the name. My question is, are they a good brand? I was looking at them or this http://www.ebay.com/itm/Coleman-Cable-92041-45-08-Wire-RG6-Quad-Coax-Black-500-ft-Box-/380503660207?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item5897c916af

I also saw that home d is selling belden crimps and connectors. You think they will get there cable? I am looking at 500ft at that price range. Any help would be good. Thanks!

E9"
post #2 of 15
If the existing coax works.... don't worry about it.
post #3 of 15
I would do Coleman before the Southwire. While Southwire is good electrical stuff, I haven't been able to find any specs for their coax.

Don't use crimp connectors -- use compression connectors. That's not a recommendation, it's a must do.
post #4 of 15
I agree with Ratman about if it works, why fix it...But I wouldn't bother with eBay for a piece of wire. The stuff they sell at HD must be at least OK or they wouldn't be selling it.
post #5 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ratman View Post

If the existing coax works.... don't worry about it.
I agree. While current supplies of RG59 cable seem to be pretty poor (poor braid and shielding and a tendency to stretch), RG59 used to exist as fairly high quality cable.
post #6 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by zaphod7501 View Post

I agree. While current supplies of RG59 cable seem to be pretty poor (poor braid and shielding and a tendency to stretch), RG59 used to exist as fairly high quality cable.
From the major CATV industry manufacturers, Series 59 cable has the same shield specifications as does Series 6 cable. Other than attenuation and V.P., the electrical specs are the same, also. Swept to a minimum of 1GHz, it is fully suitable for use in modern CATV systems. If the higher signal loss isn't of a concern, there is no reason that modern Series 59 cable can't be used.
post #7 of 15
Thread Starter 
that is some interesting responses. I thought i was goin to hear the opposite. But why did the comcast guy threaten to power me down since it was not the right cable?

I agree on trying to find the southwire spec, as I can not find anything as well. So for the price I will look into the coleman. I found them out by another poster on here by the name of FEDDERS, and his top five list.
post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by easye9inches View Post

But why did the comcast guy threaten to power me down since it was not the right cable?.

Because he is an idiot and trying to generate revenue using scare tactics. Ask yourself this.... if that cable was so bad (not up-to-code), why did he hook it up? wink.gif
post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by easye9inches View Post

...But why did the Comcast guy threaten to power me down since it was not the right cable?
You'd be surprised at how many "technicians" there are out there that will say or do only what their employer tells them to say or do. He was told that only Series 6 cable can be used for CATV, so that is what he lives by. There's nothing wrong with that (to a degree), but to say that it absolutely has to be that way is ludicrous.

My preferred coaxial cable is Times Fiber -- has been for the past 27+ years. That doesn't mean that I have this belief (let alone tell others) that other manufacturers' cable is junk and won't work. Heck, I even prefer to use Series 59 cable from the wall-plate to the equipment, regardless of the service. Less strain on the female connectors, and the 5 or 10 feet isn't going to make a bit of difference to the signal. Plus, being smaller in size and more flexible, it's easier to make look good for the customer. As long as the cable is swept to 3 Gig, it's good to go.
post #10 of 15
I've seen some pretty junky RG-59 cable.
If it's not well shielded, they WOULD have to shut you down, due to egress (outgoing leakage from the cable).

Most likely, though, they are worried about line losses, which can cause problems (especially with internet), which result in expensive "truck rolls" on their part.

If you want to DIY, go ahead and use the best stuff you can (RG-6/U Quad, compression fittings, good splitters, etc) and then sit back and enjoy it. Your time is worth more than the difference in costs between off-brand/inferior materials, and the good stuff. Of course, you don't need the "gold-plated, made by monks, from virgin copper" uber-expensive stuff, but use the same quality as the Cable company is currently using.
post #11 of 15
Unless you live in a large, metropolitan area or are close to broadcast towers, I wouldn't waste the money on Quad-shield cable.

On second thought, if you want to use Quad-shield Series 59 cable, I have a bag of Quad connectors for Series 59 cable I'd be more than happy to sell you cheap. wink.gif
post #12 of 15
Quote:
I have a bag of Quad connectors for Series 59 cable I'd be more than happy to sell you cheap.
Crimp or Compress? rolleyes.giftongue.gif
post #13 of 15
Crimp??? Quit swearing. wink.gif

Actually, I just went downstairs to make sure it was an unopened bag, and found that I have 2 unopened bags.

Digicons
Edited by egnlsn - 1/15/13 at 9:56pm
post #14 of 15
Thread Starter 
Quote:
I've seen some pretty junky RG-59 cable.
If it's not well shielded, they WOULD have to shut you down, due to egress (outgoing leakage from the cable).

Most likely, though, they are worried about line losses, which can cause problems (especially with internet), which result in expensive "truck rolls" on their part.

If you want to DIY, go ahead and use the best stuff you can (RG-6/U Quad, compression fittings, good splitters, etc) and then sit back and enjoy it. Your time is worth more than the difference in costs between off-brand/inferior materials, and the good stuff. Of course, you don't need the "gold-plated, made by monks, from virgin copper" uber-expensive stuff, but use the same quality as the Cable company is currently using.


I agree with what you are saying here. I believe that was the "big" problem he was getting at. Was the loss in internet speeds, phone calls and HDTV if they were ALL being used at once.
post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by easye9inches View Post

that is some interesting responses. I thought i was going to hear the opposite. But why did the comcast guy threaten to power me down since it was not the right cable?

He might just be ignorant. He was undoubtedly told that he must use RG-6 when he installs, and may have mistakenly concluded on his own that any use of RG-59 is unacceptable.

He of course is not going to shut anyone down on his own, as he is a grunt level employee. If the cable company detected excessive egress, then they might notify you in writing that it had to be stopped immediately, which could entail at least temporarily terminating your service. Last I knew, cable TV techs were not normally trained in egress or leakage measurement, but I don't really have any current information on cable installation and repair tech training.

He might include on his report that your internal wiring did not appear to meet minimal quality standards and that you declined to have it brought up to minimal acceptable standards during his visit, and if he so reported and if you called for service in the future, the person processing your work order might see that warning and I suppose could tell you that if the cause of the problem you have now called about is found to be wiring related, you would be responsible for the cost of that service call.

There is some RG59 that has just copper braid shielding with no foil. That is not a cheaper product: it is a different product. It is favored by surveillance camera companies because it is more flexible and therefore more break resistant, like when connected to a motorized panning camera.

But for now, if you are having no performance problems and have not received a threatening notification from the cable company, I don't see any reason for you to further address this matter at this time.
Edited by AntAltMike - 1/19/13 at 11:49am
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