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Does recording quality vary much recorder to recorder?

post #1 of 33
Thread Starter 
I used Panasonic DMR-EZ48V for four year. Totally pleased with recording quality. Finally the DVD recorder stopped reading discs.

Is the SP recording quality better than, for example the Magnavox ZV427MG9 or the Toshiba DVR620, which are both available for less than $200 on Amazon?

I don't need the digital tuner. I strictly convert VHS to DVD and hi8 camcorder tapes to DVD, plus record news clips from my Tivo onto DVD.

But image quality on the disc is very important. Mostly at SP but also at LP or EP if I'm dubbing an old VHS with 6 hours of material taped from TV.

Thanks for all your help. I am new to the forum but have learned a lot already.

Lou
post #2 of 33

IMO, you should consider the Magnavox MDR533H/F7 with hard drive. Having a hard drive for what you want to do is invaluable. It will make the job far and away easier, and afford you much more control.

post #3 of 33
Welcome to the AVS Forum.

The hard drive advice from Rammitinski is great advice; take that to the bank!

Looking at what you are planning to do,
[quote name="ragu0012" url="/t/1451716/
I don't need the digital tuner. I strictly convert VHS to DVD and hi8 camcorder tapes to DVD, plus record news clips from my Tivo onto DVD.Lou[/quote]

I would suggest you take a good look at the Panasoninc EH59 or EH69.

The edit ability on the Magnavox is primitive, essentially delete segments or titles only.

The Magnavox strong point is its excellent digital tuner, unfortunately of little use for your project.

The Panasonic edit capability is as good as the Magnavox is poor. None better on an SD DVD recorder. Learn to use their PLAYLIST function- it's not difficult. You can combine segments from anywhere on the HDD, multiple times as you wish. The Playlist does not alter the source (HDD), so if you make a catastrophic error on your Playlist, simply delete it and start over.

I don't know what kind of VHS you have, but from hi8 I would guess there may be times you'd want to jump around a bit to collect similar topics from different hi8 cassettes. With Magnavox: impossible, or at the very best, highly impractical. With the Panasonic: love it; piece of cake. Load 60 to 80 hours of tape to your hdd, then go get 'em.

6 hours on a tape, EP! Don't expect the greatest quality. Panasonic does quite well up to 4 hours on a dvd. I'll have to let others describe what happens after that. May not be bad, but not quite as good. You CAN crowd 6 hours onto a DVD; try one and see if you're happy with the results. You may be.

Feel free to ask questions, or just let us know what you've done and how you are doing.

Most here are happy to give help, and maybe almost as often, ask for help. Don't be surprised if someone comes in and says I'm all wet-- just some more points for you to consider so you can make a better informed choice.
post #4 of 33
Thread Starter 
Thanks for both of your responses. Just did some quick preliminary research on those models. Do they work with American TVs? I'm located in New York state. On the ebay listings it says they are PAL.

Also, just to understand better... I can capture my tapes onto the HDD, then burn 2 hours worth onto a DVD in the same unit?

I have a Panasonic HDTV so my dmr-ez48v worked well in conjunction with it and I'm comfortable with Panasonic's interface.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RichardT View Post

Welcome to the AVS Forum.

I would suggest you take a good look at the Panasoninc EH59 or EH69.

The Panasonic edit capability is as good as the Magnavox is poor. None better on an SD DVD recorder. Learn to use their PLAYLIST function- it's not difficult. You can combine segments from anywhere on the HDD, multiple times as you wish. The Playlist does not alter the source (HDD), so if you make a catastrophic error on your Playlist, simply delete it and start over.

I don't know what kind of VHS you have, but from hi8 I would guess there may be times you'd want to jump around a bit to collect similar topics from different hi8 cassettes. With Magnavox: impossible, or at the very best, highly impractical. With the Panasonic: love it; piece of cake. Load 60 to 80 hours of tape to your hdd, then go get 'em.

6 hours on a tape, EP! Don't expect the greatest quality. Panasonic does quite well up to 4 hours on a dvd. I'll have to let others describe what happens after that. May not be bad, but not quite as good. You CAN crowd 6 hours onto a DVD; try one and see if you're happy with the results. You may be.

Feel free to ask questions, or just let us know what you've done and how you are doing.

Most here are happy to give help, and maybe almost as often, ask for help. Don't be surprised if someone comes in and says I'm all wet-- just some more points for you to consider so you can make a better informed choice.
post #5 of 33
Yes, the Panasonics will work with either NTSC or PAL, you select in the SETUP menu. They will not convert from one to the other, but will copy NTSC if NTSC is input. They now come with the small power plug adapter and will work on 120volt power.

Check bhphotovideo.com; they have an EH59 for $325, free shipping, also a used EH69 for $299, I would guess shipping not included. These are import models and do not have manufacturer's warrantee, but B&H gives a 90-day warrantee. That B&H price is a good price, considering I paid $400 to $450 or more for my earlier models, EH55, E100H and E85H years ago. I also have a Magnavox MDR515, beautiful tuner for public television. I have purchased 4 EH59's, one used I gave to my son, one new I'm keeping, one used that I returned because DV-RAM was not functional, the fourth new to replace the one I returned; I bought that for a friend. You might gather that I am biased!

The EH59 has the most convenience features of the Panasonic line: longer (40 character) Phrase Save- handy for titles, "Refresh", where a current recording replaces the previous recording of that schedule; say you have a recording scheduled for 1700 every Monday evening (yes, they use the unambiguous 24-hour clock), the new Monday evening recording will replace the previous Monday evening recording if you've specified the Refresh option.

eBay is good for some things, but I've seen used older models of Panasonic dvdr's sell for more than B&H was asking new.
post #6 of 33
Sorry, I didn't answer your second question. Yes, you record your tapes onto the HDD, build your Playlists (each Playlist becomes a separate title on the DVD), build a Copylist, (you may not want to copy all your Playlists onto THIS dvd), then copy the titles and/or playlists onto the dvd. There are some little quirks you'll run into-- If you copy in high-speed (a full disc in 12 to 15 minutes), at each edit point in your playlist, there will be a slight freeze or pause of perhaps 1/2 second. To get "seamless" playback or copy, you'll need to copy in "real time", 2 hrs for a 2-hr disc.

Let me mention here that the preferred (that's an understatement) disc brand in the Taiyu Yuden dvd-r 8X, Made in Japan. Get the Premium Quality, not the Value Line. These are available on line from SuperMedia store.
post #7 of 33
If you are used to the Panasonic interface I say the EH-59 or EH-69 will be your best bet. Like your EZ-48v they will interface quite nicely with your HDTV via HDMI.
Even though the EH-59/69 is international it has almost the same feel as your EZ-48v. I also prefer the Panasonic picture in all modes but expecially in the 2+ to ~3hr or even 4hr durations where almost all other brands switch to 1/2 D1 resolution Panasonic stays in full resolution.
If you liked your EZ-48v(which most people seem to consider to be one of the flakiest models Panasonic made) I can only think like the EH-59/69 better. I have a couple EH-59s and really love them.

One issue I like to point out is they have the international standard for black, what this means if you are particularly fussy about black blacks you might notice they are a couple shades lighter(+7.5 IRE to be exact). If the device you are recording from is another DVD player you should be OK since most have a DARKER or international setting, unfortunately things like N. American STBs or VCRs will not have such a setting. It's possible using something like a proc amp to darken the line input to a international Panasonic but many times people aren't too bothered by this or even notice it. You can slightly turn down the brightness on your TV to correct it but whats recorded will be slightly off N. American spec.
Something actually meant for the N. American market like a EH-55 will have a DARKER setting already built into the DVDR but then again the EH-55 hasn't been made for 6+ years and the chance of finding one new is very slim and I'm guessing would cost several times what a international Panasonic goes for.
Edited by jjeff - 1/14/13 at 6:44am
post #8 of 33
Thread Starter 
well i think you sold me
post #9 of 33
Thread Starter 
I have been using sony dvd-r printable discs (the white ones). IS the difference huge to the Taiyu? In what way?
Quote:
Originally Posted by RichardT View Post


Let me mention here that the preferred (that's an understatement) disc brand in the Taiyu Yuden dvd-r 8X, Made in Japan. Get the Premium Quality, not the Value Line. These are available on line from SuperMedia store.
post #10 of 33
I also used to use the white printable top Sony 16x discs(from Costco) which were genuine Sony media. While not rated as good as something like Tys or even AZO Verbatims they are still rated pretty good. Unlike the other Sony DVDs(pearl top for sure) which are made by Ritek which is a much lower grade and lower rated.
The picture quality will be the same with any brand DVD but if they start to fail like the cheaper ones have been known to do, the picture may be full of break-ups or refuse to play at all.
I'd still be using the Sony printables but Costco stopped selling them, in favor of the low grade TDK(CMC) DVDs frown.gif
post #11 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by ragu0012 View Post

well i think you sold me

Wrong! The machine, with its features, has to sell itself.

Been wondering what's been happening. Let us know your decision, experience, and opinions.

DFTP. "Don't Fight The Problem." With your Panasonic background, you should have little difficulty with the numerous options, but if you do bump into what seems like a blank wall, don't hesitate to share; likely someone else has already been there.
post #12 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by ragu0012 View Post

I have been using sony dvd-r printable discs (the white ones). IS the difference huge to the Taiyu? In what way?







All kidding aside.

Taiyo Yuden discs are very highly rated indeed and you can’t go wrong using them. But if you want to go strictly by the number one rated disc (recently) go with a Verbatim AZO disc. Any speed rating will do as they are all rated to go all the way down to real-time 1x burning.

But my motto is – if you’re happy with your Sony burns and aren’t having any longevity issues then “if it ain’t broken why fix it”
post #13 of 33
Great! eek.gif Thanks for that. eek.gifeek.gif I now have the announcer's voice in my head saying, "As always, this disk will self-destruct in five to ten years. frown.gif Good luck!" biggrin.gif
post #14 of 33
Thread Starter 
I ordered an eh59. Waiting patiently for it to arrive. Only thing concerned about is that black level issue.
post #15 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by ragu0012 View Post

I ordered an eh59. Waiting patiently for it to arrive. Only thing concerned about is that black level issue.

Depends on how picky you are about black level. I tend to like my images - both still photographs and video - on the slightly over-exposed side, so this is something I probably wouldn't care about, even if I noticed it on my own. Plus, when you're dubbing from one machine, say a CECB or cable/sat set-top box to a DVDR, you're going to suffer some degredation of image quality - a little lightening, a little darkening, a little loss of contrast aren't surprising.

So as people like to say on forums, YMMV!
Edited by doswonk1 - 1/18/13 at 11:20am
post #16 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by ragu0012 View Post

I ordered an eh59. Waiting patiently for it to arrive. Only thing concerned about is that black level issue.
Please post back your impressions smile.gif
I don't think it really bothers most people and before I started actively posting on the issue I don't think it was widely known. Not that back in '02 and earlier when the N. American Panasonics also had the issue it wasn't posted on sites like AVS and VideoHelp but for whatever reason most people may not have realized the international Panasonics had the same issue.
If it truly bothers you, you have the option of purchasing something like a proc amp or even a TBC with a brightness setting but at least with the proc amp it starts North of $200 so it's not a cheap option but of you also want something to remove CP the TBC would kill two birds with one stone. A passable CP remover starts ~$100 and good one is close to the price of a entry level TBC.
post #17 of 33
Thread Starter 
Still awaiting shipment of my eh59 but I thought of a question. I will record my VHS tape onto HDD, then onto DVD. Do I select video quality for each and must it be the same? For example should I record XP quality to the HDD for best quality then SP to the DVD so I can fit two hours? Or would it have to stay XP (one hour) for both?
post #18 of 33
What you should do for the best results is to choose the highest quality you can (for the program length) and copy the content to the HDD for editing. Even if you have to use the FR feature, you want the recording to be the highest quality, because, to preserve that quality, you definitely want HS dub that title from th HDD to the DVD optical media. Avoid multiple encoding if at all possible. High Speed dubbing will copy the title without loss from the hard drive to a DVD.
post #19 of 33
As Luke said, when recording to the HDD always try and record in a speed which will allow you to HS(high speed and lossless) copy to a DVD.
Personally I rarely use speeds below 2hrs and try and not fit more than 2.5 to 3hrs of main program or up to 4hrs(LP) of things like extras to a SL DVD. If you bitstarve a recording you'll get macroblocking during scenes of faster movement, going over 4hrs(LP) results in the machine switching to a lower resolution which I avoid at all costs.
A DVD can contain titles with many different speeds but the speed of a title must remain that through the whole title(IOW to change speeds you need to make a new title to change speeds).
If you want to get into chapters they need to be created on the HDD before burning to DVD, once burnt you cannot add chapters to the title on the DVD.
If you only want to put one title on a DVD and that title is say 90 minutes I'd go lower than SP and set FR for 91 minutes(always want to leave a 1 minute buffer when using FR) but ideally I use SP and add another 37 minute SP title to the DVD which would totally fill it up with two titles in a very good quality. Of course your second title could be say 1hr 14 minutes if you used LP but it would have some macroblocking so I wouldn't do that unless you weren't as fussy about the picture quality.
post #20 of 33
In summary, if I can, you should choose a quality that will come as close as possible to completely filling the disk, without going over, and use that to record to the HDD. Then after editing, HS copy that to the optical media. This will give you the absolute best quality recordings.
post #21 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by ragu0012 View Post

Still awaiting shipment of my eh59 but I thought of a question. I will record my VHS tape onto HDD, then onto DVD. Do I select video quality for each and must it be the same? For example should I record XP quality to the HDD for best quality then SP to the DVD so I can fit two hours? Or would it have to stay XP (one hour) for both?

Try it and see! Find a tape of high quality, with some print or lettering or fine detail, then record it to hdd at XP, then again at SP. You need not record 2 or 10 hours, probably 5 minutes each would be more than enough. Then play it back. See what you think, is there enough noticeable difference? There may be some tapes you want to record at XP for sentimental reasons.

Nearly all my recording is at SP; LP for OTA news that I watch and delete.

Bear in mind that recording to hdd is only as good as the source; don't expect XP quality from an EP tape.

I'm sure you'll be happy with the choice you made. None better for editting-- use PLAYLIST for that.
post #22 of 33
Thread Starter 
OK I think i'm getting this now.

HS dubbing would be better than saving to HDD at XP then to DVD at SP because that process would involve multiple encoding.

Someone mentioned however to record dvd at realtime to avoid a hiccup when it goes from one title to the next?

Basically two things i'll be doing... dubbing home movies and creating news "highlight" reels (i'm a reporter so it's like video resume for myself). For the home movies, i like the idea of dubbing a lot of tapes to the HDD, and then recording relevant stuff together onto the same DVD. There are some tapes that include a 10 minute band concert and nothing else which could be combined with other things. Other tapes are filled with 2 hours of family vacation so it would fit a DVD perfectly as-is.

As for my news highlights, I record entire newscasts on my Tivo HD, then my old process with my DMR-EZ48V involved just pushing record on relevant clips, pausing at the end, going to the next newscast and repeating. I would leave the unfinished DVD in the recorder until I fill close to 2 hours then finish the disc. With the HDD, i could do the same process except i won't have to record anything onto disc and risk a bad finish, until i have my 2h collected. (in case you are a Tivo user and wondering this process is more efficient than using Tivo Desktop to transfer files wirelessly then edit them on my desktop)

The only EP tapes i even need to worry about are a couple David Copperfield TV specials from the 80s and made for TV movies that are not available in other formats. I have realistic expectations just wanted to make sure i'm not losing further quality. When I had a cheap Magnavox DVD Recorder i noticed pixilation when i tried preserving anything longer than SP... and sometimes pixilation even at SP)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Church AV Guy View Post

to preserve that quality, you definitely want HS dub that title from th HDD to the DVD optical media. Avoid multiple encoding if at all possible. High Speed dubbing will copy the title without loss from the hard drive to a DVD.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jjeff View Post

As Luke said, when recording to the HDD always try and record in a speed which will allow you to HS(high speed and lossless) copy to a DVD.
post #23 of 33
Thread Starter 
i have a long reply but it is being "moderated" before posting i guess.
in the meantime, thank you for your replies.
EDIT
(okay, the reply got posted now above this one)
Edited by ragu0012 - 1/19/13 at 7:48pm
post #24 of 33
My comment: You don't learn to swim from a book; you've got to get in the water.

You've done some pretty thorough research. When your machine arrives, try different things. Don't be afraid of making a mistake, you learn more from your mistakes than from your successes. I tell my camera people, "don't be afraid of making a mistake. Just don't make the same mistake twice." That way, when all the possible mistakes have been made, we'll be off and running error-free.

Those "freezes" are in the same playlist (title) when there has been a deletion of a segment. The reason is logical, once the mechanics of the recording is understood. If the dropped segments are in places where the freeze is not noticeable, fine. But where those freezes are unacceptable, the FR and XP modes in real time work just fine, have weekly for the past 8 years where I've been editting the church service to 58 minutes 30 seconds for broadcast over LPTV. I'll accept the possible slight reencoding loss rather the irritation of dozens of those momentary pauses.

THINK VIEWER! My viewing audience would find those frequent "freezes" a whole lot more irritating than the reencoding loss which they don't know exists, and I don't know if it is even noticeable.

This is not to negate the advice to avoid real time copies when possible, and with planning, a lot of it can be avoided.
post #25 of 33
At the risk of contradicting myself, I have to agree with Richard T. I have given this advice many times myself. Test out the various methods of doing what you want to do and see which one you like the best. The machine is very flexible, so there are lots of ways of geting from point A to point B. Don't necessarily rely on what I do, or what jjeff does, figure out what works best for you and use that. There are some basic things to be aware of, like reencoding causing a generation loss, but as Richard says, maybe not too bad, and maybe more tolerable than the artifacts that are inherent from using HS dubbing. It's all a matter of what looks good to YOU.
Quote:
Basically two things i'll be doing... dubbing home movies and creating news "highlight" reels (i'm a reporter so it's like video resume for myself). For the home movies, i like the idea of dubbing a lot of tapes to the HDD, and then recording relevant stuff together onto the same DVD. There are some tapes that include a 10 minute band concert and nothing else which could be combined with other things. Other tapes are filled with 2 hours of family vacation so it would fit a DVD perfectly as-is.

As for my news highlights, I record entire newscasts on my Tivo HD, then my old process with my DMR-EZ48V involved just pushing record on relevant clips, pausing at the end, going to the next newscast and repeating. I would leave the unfinished DVD in the recorder until I fill close to 2 hours then finish the disc. With the HDD, i could do the same process except i won't have to record anything onto disc and risk a bad finish, until i have my 2h collected.

Both of these are difficult, but using the playlist feature of your new recorder, they are very simple. It truely is an amazing feature, and I'm sure you will grow to appreciate it quickly.
post #26 of 33
ragu, I make "news highlight reels" all the time - I'm a news junkie. I record whole broadcasts to my HDD in SP, then I edit out what I don't want from each broadcast. Then, I make a copylist of the edited broadcasts short enough to fit on one DVD. Then, I record it to DVD at high-speed. It couldn't be easier. My DVDs usually have a short bit of time left, depending on the lengths of the different titles, but I don't consider that a problem.
post #27 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by ragu0012 View Post

(in case you are a Tivo user and wondering this process is more efficient than using Tivo Desktop to transfer files wirelessly then edit them on my desktop)
I do the same thing and while I can't say that I've even tried the Tivo Desktop method I've read others state just what you said. I'm kind of a talk show junkie and like to record many 1hr HD talk shows to my Tivo HD. I then play them back realtime and record to the HDD of one of my Panasoncs, pausing and FF'ing my Tivo for areas I don't want to save. Sure it's not HD but if my source is good(true HD and not upconverted HD like some programs) and I use the S-video out that only my HD has (not the new premier with only composite) I get DVDs that look as good as a commercial DVD. Not HD which might be nice but I can live with high quality SD.
It only takes me ~11 minutes to record the 10 minutes or so I want off a 1hr talk show, my guess using a computer it would take at least three times that, which I just wouldn't have time for.
As other have said, sure you get a slight pause whenever you edit off the HDD but it's no worse and maybe even better than the PAUSE, REC method one would use with a non HDD DVDR. Only on a couple occasions have I done a realtime copy from HDD to DVD and I agree it did lessen the pauses but due to time, possible increased laser wear and tear and slight picture degradation I chose to live with a little pause but I can see why others may chose to go the other route, to each his own smile.gif
post #28 of 33
The nice thing is that with HDD/DVD recorders we have options.

For instance when jjeff did his VHS to DVD transfers what worked for him was real-time transfers. Mind you those transfers were directly to DVD avoiding the HDD to DVD real-time transfer quality loss. For me I couldn’t go that route because I like to chapter all my songs when digitizing my taped concerts. So for me VHS to DVD is recorded to HDD, prepped cutting unwanted parts and lossless HDD to DVD dubs retaining chapters.

For Richard the slight quality loss (from recoding real-time from HDD to DVD) is a better option than the slight freezes we get from editing on HDD and lossless HSD to DVD. With my concerts I rather live with the slight pause between edits but retain my chapter marks between songs and not suffer the slight recode quality loss. Oh Richard biggrin.gif this is were the Pioneers/Sony have a slight advantage for your method – we have a 15Mbps bit-rate setting for the HDD for this reason. So if you record in 15Mbps and than transcode to a lesser bit rate like XP or SP you should get less of a quality hit. Although at work using MPEG-2 SD – the minimal acceptable recode would be going from 50 Mbps to 18 Mbps prior to play-out. Going from 15 Mbps to 5 Mbps (like my Sony going from XP+ to SP does) would be an unacceptable quality hit according to most broadcast engineers that I worked with.

As to the real time burning using HDD/DVD decks, I’m not convinced that this is harder on the laser than HSD burning.

1) Although 1x burning takes a lot longer to burn, 1x burning takes a lot less laser power than 6x burning. Also, 1x means slower spindle rotation and that must be easier on the servo than fast spindle rotation that 6x burning takes.

BUT

2) It is possible (and probable) that our decks burn real time burns at 4x using the 4x / pause / 4x pause / 4x pause method. How else would you explain burning anything in real time mode at a slower than XP bit rate? Are real time SP burns over burning by times 2? Or is the laser using half the laser power? Both those examples are off spec and would produce a sub par burn. In fact any none XP bit rate burned at real time would produce a sub par off spec real time burn unless our decks apply the burn / pause / burn / pause method. I mention the 4x pause / 4x pause strategy because that is exactly what my LG PC burner does when burning real time. If this is the case with our HSD stand alones than with so called real time we are using slightly less laser power as HSD 6x takes but doing real time 4x pause 4x pause burning would also stress the laser less because of the pauses thus generating less heat.
post #29 of 33
Thread Starter 
I am keeping my DMR-EZ48V to use the VCR portion despite the DVD drive being bad. My question, is there any place someone like me could order a new DVD drive part and attempt to fix myself? I mean no disrespect to repair specialists, but I decided to order the HDD instead of paying for the repair. However if I could buy the part myself it might be a fun basement project to tinker around.
post #30 of 33
Quote:
Originally Posted by ragu0012 View Post

My question, is there any place someone like me could order a new DVD drive part and attempt to fix myself? if I could buy the part myself it might be a fun basement project to tinker around.

No, there isn't, and no, you can't.

If such an option was available, you wouldn't have received 28 replies suggesting you buy a different recorder: within the first six replies, someone would have advised you how to repair it yourself. Panasonic, like most other brands, used goofball proprietary dedicated burner designs in their recorders that cannot be sourced from anyone but Panasonic service centers at a cost that exceeded that of a new recorder. If you were luckier, and your EZ48v had broken down two years earlier, you could have still used their flat-fee $150 mail-in repair depot. But that repair service has been discontinued, and the only recourse left for USA Panasonic owners is private specialists like our own mickinct here on AVS. While he does excellent work at a reasonable price, that price still exceeds the intrinsic value of an EZ48v: today, it really doesn't make sense to spend $150-250 on repairs for anything but the best vintage DVD/HDD models. With something like the EZ48v, its usually better to spend that repair money on a more convenient brand-new DVD/HDD model like the Magnavox series or import Panasonics.

I will concede that in theory, if you were extremely advanced in doing electronics repair as a hobby, already had access to an assortment of expensive testing gear, could isolate exactly which part of the burner is broken, and could find a source that still had that part, then yeah: maybe you could repair your EZ48v burner for about $75. Complete replacement burners were obscenely expensive at $200-$300 wholesale, unless you knew about the Panasonic direct mail-in depot. Independent repair shops would usually try to replace the specific broken part in the burner, rather than the whole assembly. The most difficult aspect today would be finding the parts: Panasonic itself doesn't have them anymore. A handful of forward-thinking independent techs like mickinct stockpiled a small stash of these parts when they saw the writing on the wall some years ago, but these techs are not going to sell you these rare parts wholesale: it would be against their own business interests.

Keep the EZ48v if you like its VCR section. But forget about the dead DVD section: its a lost cause. Buy one of the other recorders suggested above, or use a PC.
Edited by CitiBear - 1/22/13 at 9:20am
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