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Oppo BDP-105 "Sound Quality" Check Thread for Audiophiles - Page 17

post #481 of 1445
Quote:
Originally Posted by wse View Post

Widescreen review gives this player the best sound rating, Cambridge Audio Azur 752BD 3D Blu-ray universal player!

What do you think?

A5 separate Wolfson WM8740 D/A converters, to ensure that every audio channel is decoded in the highest possible quality
Anagram Q5 192 kHz up-sampling technology, to up-sample all audio to 24- bit/192kHz output
2D

I think that is one person's opinion. Kris Deering's comparison should be up soon in Home Theater. I'm sure both are excellent and it really comes down to personal taste.
post #482 of 1445
Quote:
Originally Posted by BillP View Post

I think that is one person's opinion. Kris Deering's comparison should be up soon in Home Theater. I'm sure both are excellent and it really comes down to personal taste.

Yes it is one person's opinion I was wondering how others felt, I am sticking with Oppo they have outstanding customer service plus they are in California and respond to email event on Sunday!
post #483 of 1445
Quote:
Originally Posted by wse View Post

Widescreen review gives this player the best sound rating, Cambridge Audio Azur 752BD 3D Blu-ray universal player!

What do you think?

A5 separate Wolfson WM8740 D/A converters, to ensure that every audio channel is decoded in the highest possible quality
Anagram Q5 192 kHz up-sampling technology, to up-sample all audio to 24- bit/192kHz output
2D


"The Wolfson is 2CH each, the Sabre 8CH each, so it's 10 vs. 16 in realit"y.biggrin.gif I stole this from another poster, but accurate.smile.gif

From the horses mouth so to speak.smile.gif
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cambridge_Audio View Post

The USB input isn't an async DAC input but we do fit this to the matching 751R. The differences between the 752BD and Oppo effectively come down to whether you prefer a Wolfson based decoding system or an ESS one.
Regards
Ed
post #484 of 1445
Quote:
Originally Posted by BillP View Post

I think that is one person's opinion. Kris Deering's comparison should be up soon in Home Theater. I'm sure both are excellent and it really comes down to personal taste.

It's interesting how some can read 50 reviews, but pick out the 2 dissenting one out of the 50.smile.gif.
post #485 of 1445
Quote:
Originally Posted by bakerwi View Post

It's interesting how some can read 50 reviews, but pick out the 2 dissenting one out of the 50.smile.gif.

Some people are just concentrating on negativity or contrarian. Just like in the medieval ages, it's not because the majority of the clergy said that the world is flat that it is!
post #486 of 1445
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Pariseau View Post

^ No problem, I was just teasing. Thus the --> biggrin.gif

A sound processor or Receiver used with Analog Bypass is basically a pre-amp. A simple one to be sure, as it only offers Volume control, but still there is active circuitry which the Analog audio signal must traverse to get from input to output. It is not the equivalent of a passive switch.

When used in Bypass the processor is not TRYING to alter the signal (except for Volume), but there are still characteristics of design which will make it better or worse as "just" a pre-amp. It used to be that folks would spend lots of money trying to get a better pre-amp to go with their better amp, speakers and source devices. These days, with digital audio processing all the rage, the pre-amp characteristics of sound processors don't get as much attention. But it remains the case that some designs will do it better than others.

And thus you've got folks here experimenting with connecting the OPPO BDP-105 *DIRECTLY* to a power-amp -- no pre-amp in-between -- relying on the Volume control offered in the 105 itself. Some folks have found that the output level of the OPPO is not a good match for direct input into their power-amps. I.e., they miss not having a pre-emp in the path -- there's that active circuitry again (i.e., the input impedance of a pre-amp is much higher than is typical for a power-amp). Other folks have found this works just fine for them, and thus they don't have to worry about the analog audio quality characteristics of any pre-amp.
--Bob

To this end I tried a yamaha 5790 as a preamp, bypassing all processing. I did the same with an Arcam avr300. The 3rd setup I tried was an oppo95 directly to a Bryston 3B-ST and Lexicon (by Bryston) 5ch amp for surround. The 5790 killed the sound, cold and lifeless. The arcam was much better but still degraded the sound significantly compared to the 95 direct to amp. My speakers are not really efficient, especially the mains (PSB Stratus Gold). I listen to music around 65 to 80 on the 95's output scale, movies around 66-74.
I have moderate room treatment, mostly to stop first reflections, and careful speaker/seating placement to minimize room modes etc. I'd like to try XT32 or similar, but my experiences with avrs indicates that I would need a very expensive unit to avoid the processing/connection losses offsetting frequency corrections. I'm more of a purist, using minimal connections and cabling and opting for cafreful setup over processing, and I've had very good results. Of course synergy with the oppo is important for this to work.
Because of the way I use the 95 I'm very interested in the 105, mostly so I can connect a sattelite reciever to the system, and maybe a laptop once in a while... but the 95 is working so well I haven;t been able to justify upgrade cost... I just lurk in the 105 forums biggrin.gif
post #487 of 1445
Quote:
Originally Posted by jima4a View Post

I currently have a Oppo 103 connected via HDMI2 to an Integra DHC80.3. Do you think I will get any gains going to the 105 and feeding it analog, and if so, how much. FWIW I do not use Audyssey for music so no worry about another A to D and D to A conversion, it will stay analog. The 80.3 has Burr Brown 192/32 DACs.

My Denon 4520 has the same BB DACs as your Integra. If you call Oppo to ask their opinion, it will really come down to how much music you listen to. If you do more movie watching with Audyssey for your movies, and little to no music playback like I do, they will tell you to go with the 103 (that's what I was told when I asked them point blank). You can also use the 7.1 analog on your 103 to give you a feel for analog audio on your Integra.

When I had the 95, I loved the sound quality of music over analog, but preferred digital audio for movies (it seems like a lot of 105 owners fall in this camp too). You can always demo the 105 and see if it meets your needs; worst case you are out return shipping costs instead of $700 for an upgrade you may not need. Since I watch movies and rarely listen to music, I took Oppo's advice and went with the 103. No remorse whatsoever. smile.gif
post #488 of 1445

I do music 70% of the time and Movies 30% so for me the Oppo BDP-105 it is :)


Edited by wse - 4/1/13 at 12:58pm
post #489 of 1445
Quote:
Originally Posted by wse View Post

I do music 70% of the time and Movies 30% so for me the Oppo BDP-95 it is smile.gif

You mean Oppo BDP-105 don't you.
post #490 of 1445
Quote:
Originally Posted by mt14942 View PostYou mean Oppo BDP-105 don't you.

Yes 105 corrected

post #491 of 1445
Quote:
Originally Posted by SergeantYnot View Post

My Denon 4520 has the same BB DACs as your Integra. If you call Oppo to ask their opinion, it will really come down to how much music you listen to. If you do more movie watching with Audyssey for your movies, and little to no music playback like I do, they will tell you to go with the 103 (that's what I was told when I asked them point blank). You can also use the 7.1 analog on your 103 to give you a feel for analog audio on your Integra.

When I had the 95, I loved the sound quality of music over analog, but preferred digital audio for movies (it seems like a lot of 105 owners fall in this camp too). You can always demo the 105 and see if it meets your needs; worst case you are out return shipping costs instead of $700 for an upgrade you may not need. Since I watch movies and rarely listen to music, I took Oppo's advice and went with the 103. No remorse whatsoever. smile.gif
I probably do TV more than any but music is my priority. I already have the 103 so the 105 would be in addition. Waiting on Kris Deering's review of the Cambridge Audio 752 before pulling any triggers.
post #492 of 1445
Quote:
Originally Posted by jima4a View Post

I probably do TV more than any but music is my priority. I already have the 103 so the 105 would be in addition. Waiting on Kris Deering's review of the Cambridge Audio 752 before pulling any triggers.

You might definitely be a candidate for the 105 then if music is your priority. If you have no plans to use room correction ever, stay with 7.1 or 5.1 audio and just listen to music, then the 105 would be the player to get. I can tell you personally that I have the multichannel analog connected on my 103, and have not even gotten around to configuring it yet as I am extremely happy with the Oppo playing my movies with Audyssey on a 9.2 system.
post #493 of 1445
Just got my Oppo Bdp 105. Sounds awesome, analog connects sound a little noisy. Like extra background noise. How do I shut off Oppo crossovers and speaker setting and just let my Anthem AVM 50v handle that. I just listened to Dianna Krall SACD and it sounded !@#$ing awesome!
post #494 of 1445
Quote:
Originally Posted by turk 182 View Post

Just got my Oppo Bdp 105. Sounds awesome, analog connects sound a little noisy. Like extra background noise. How do I shut off Oppo crossovers and speaker setting and just let my Anthem AVM 50v handle that. I just listened to Dianna Krall SACD and it sounded !@#$ing awesome!

To bypass the Speaker Configuration processing for the multi-channel Analog outputs, go into Speaker Configuration and set all Speakers Large and the Subwoofer ON. Set all speakers equidistant -- any distance will do so long as they are all the same (you can just leave the default 12 foot distance for each). Set all speakers to 0dB Volume Trim. In Audio Processing, set Volume to FIXED (which is equivalent to the 100 level). Set DTS Neo:6 Mode OFF except when you actually want to use it. Set HDCD Decoding ON. With these settings you can use EITHER SACD Output DSD or PCM at your preference (turn HDMI Audio OFF as well when you want to use DSD).

Your AVM 50v has 5.1 channel Analog input (not 7.1 channel), so you should set Down Mix in the OPPO to 5.1.

If you want to use ARC on that Analog input in the AVM 50v, set the 6-Channel Source definition to get its audio input as ANALOG-DSP, and, after producing and uploading you ARC solution, set Room EQ = ON in there as well.

The settings above for the OPPO will mean its Analog Subwoofer output needs +10dB boost external to the player to match the other RCA jacks. The AVM 50v provides that by default, so there's nothing special you need to do.

The combo of the 105 and the AVM 50v for Analog should be dead quiet. If you are hearing noise and you are SURE it is not in the content as recorded, then something is wrong.
--Bob
post #495 of 1445
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Pariseau View Post

To bypass the Speaker Configuration processing for the multi-channel Analog outputs, go into Speaker Configuration and set all Speakers Large and the Subwoofer ON. Set all speakers equidistant -- any distance will do so long as they are all the same (you can just leave the default 12 foot distance for each). Set all speakers to 0dB Volume Trim. In Audio Processing, set Volume to FIXED (which is equivalent to the 100 level). Set DTS Neo:6 Mode OFF except when you actually want to use it. Set HDCD Decoding ON. With these settings you can use EITHER SACD Output DSD or PCM at your preference (turn HDMI Audio OFF as well when you want to use DSD).

Your AVM 50v has 5.1 channel Analog input (not 7.1 channel), so you should set Down Mix in the OPPO to 5.1.

If you want to use ARC on that Analog input in the AVM 50v, set the 6-Channel Source definition to get its audio input as ANALOG-DSP, and, after producing and uploading you ARC solution, set Room EQ = ON in there as well.

The settings above for the OPPO will mean its Analog Subwoofer output needs +10dB boost external to the player to match the other RCA jacks. The AVM 50v provides that by default, so there's nothing special you need to do.

The combo of the 105 and the AVM 50v for Analog should be dead quiet. If you are hearing noise and you are SURE it is not in the content as recorded, then something is wrong.
--Bob


Thank you Bob for the response. I am using ARC. My connections are HDMI for movie/music and L/R interconnects for 2 channel. I ran 1 ARC session for everything. I think your saying basically HDMI will be the same ARC settings no matter what I play and not to fiddle with it after ARC did it`s thing with that lone HDMI connection. I got all this gear mainly for movies. But I can run another ARC session and calculate it more specifically for music through the 2 channel connection. So on Anthem, when using dvd source or HDMI connection, whatever ARC did leave that alone, but when using or pressing CD on Anthem remote I can specify through set up and ARC something different and have it not effect movies.
post #496 of 1445
^ You should take your Anthem ARC questions to the Anthem thread as there are lots of people there who can help answer them.

For the OPPO, just keep in mind that its Speaker Configuration settings ONLY apply to its multi-channel ANALOG outputs (which even excludes the Dedicated Stereo Analog outputs unless you have changed the Stereo Signal setting to FRONT LEFT/RIGHT).

But in brief you can set ANY input of the Anthem to use either one of the up to two ARC solutions you create.
--Bob
post #497 of 1445
Great thread. When using the 105 as a DAC, does it matter from a SQ standpoint whether the USB, coax, or optical input is used?

Also, has anyone compared the Hegel HD20 DAC to the Oppo 105 DAC? I'm trying to decide whether I get the 105 and use it as a DAC or run both my music server and my 83SE (through it's coax out) to the HD20. Thanks.
post #498 of 1445
Quote:
Originally Posted by rman66 View Post

So connecting the Oppo to Marantz either via HDMI or Analog audio will not be using Oppo's BDP-105 full capability or justify its presence.


The equipment I mentioned above (Marantz 1602 + BDP-105+NHT 3.1 speakers) is in my living room..

I also have the Peach tree audio nova amp in another area of my house (paired with a Sony S570 bluray player+ Epson 8100 projector)

Would the Oppo be better paired with the Peach Tree Nova? My only issue with the Nova is that it doesnt have 3.1 capability although for stereo (2.1) it is outstanding.
I also have a Sonos ZP90 in the slot inside the Peachtree for streaming music

Here is an image of the Peachtree Nova back panel

I would connect the dedicated analog RCA's out of the OPPO to the analog CD inputs on your Marantz. Use the CD setting when you want to listen to analog music (which uses the OPPO's DAC, and is really the benefit of the 105 over the 103).

Connect the HDMI2 out of the OPPO to the Marantz and HDMI1 out of the OPPO directly to the TV and select HDMI split in the OPPO menu. This will give you the best picture possible and allow you to get lossless audio through the Marantz.
post #499 of 1445
Has any one tried to compare the Oppo vs the Classe SSP-800 or CP-800 .
post #500 of 1445
Wolfson DAC Thoughts:

One advantage to the manufacturer who uses Wolfson DAC’s, such as the WM8740, is that Wolfson DAC’s supply a voltage out which provides significant cost reductions and saves board space. Higher quality units such as from ESS and Burr-Brown (pcm1792, pcm1795) have current outputs which require two high quality op amps per channel to convert to voltage but supply a higher quality output. This function is accomplished inside the Wolfson DAC. The OPPO units using the ESS DAC have a lot more circuitry after the DAC's (multi-channel or stereo) than you'll likely find with any Wolfson implementation. The OPPO units give better measured performance. The Wolfson WM8741 has better specs than the WM8740 but is still only voltage out.

Overall BDP-105 Thoughts:

To see the amazing measured performance of the BDP-105 make sure you go to the HI-Fi News website (UK), if you haven’t already, and then to the test results presented by Miller Audio. You'll have to register and get a password, but then looking at the January 1013 issue for the OPPO BDP-105 results you'll find some amazing numbers. Only the test results are presented, not the HI-FI written review so it may take a few minutes to understand what is there but they are amazing. The OPPO compares very favorably with the megabuck dCS Vivaldi Digital system whose measurements are in the February 2013 edition. The quality and thoroughness of Miller Audio’s work for HI-FI News to me makes it by far the best site for measurements on the web.

I've been using the BDP-105 as a preamp since I received it in December 2012. The audio sync issue through the HDMI inputs has been a real problem and aggravation, but the latest beta seems to fix that. Four months was an unacceptably long time to wait for a feature which is listed in OPPO's specs and promotional materials. I had another issue which seemed to relate to some component reacting to heat but a replacement unit has solved that issue.

I drive Anthem P5 amps with no problem using the balanced outputs and the RCA’s. The BDP-105 has a low output impedance (approx. 100 ohms for the balanced output). Assuming a similar number for the RCA’s the BDP-105 should have no problem driving any amplifier I’ve seen even if two channels are driven in parallel for bi-amping purposes.

When used for two channel music (usually classical or jazz) the OPPO-105 is truly excellent. (Revel Salon’s) The video quality is stunning.

One hassle with the BDP-105 is that the last input selected is not retained so if one is using say the HDMI input on the back and then powers off the unit, when again powered on the input is the Blu-Ray Player, not the real HDMI input. I suggested changing to OPPO tech support but was told it would be too confusing for tech support to trouble shoot units if the outputs were retained over power cycles. Personally I disagree with this view of how to evaluate potential features. I also suggested putting the input menu on the top menu and that was thought to have promise.

In summary the BDP-105 has been a frustrating unit for me. It has a great basic hardware design which has been somewhat marred by problematic firmware. The step to acting as a preamp replacement is incomplete. I would buy the BDP-105 again now, but I wish I had waited until now, given the overall issues and the one issue I had requiring replacement of my first unit.
post #501 of 1445
Bigguyca,
What volume do you listen to on the oppo? I spoke with oppo tech support trying to figure out the best amp to run direct into the 105. They give the recommendation that the stereo amp have an input impedance of 47k ohms. If a stereo amp with an input impedance of 100k ohms is used, it could be too quiet even at 100 volume level on oppo. In the opposite direction, an input impedance of 22k or below might make the volume level too loud even at lower volume levels on the oppo.

Further info on output impedance of oppo 105: Front L/R (both dedicated and multichannel) are both 100 ohms, but remainder of multichannel (C,surrounds, etc.) are 200 ohms.

They said that for optimum use of direct connections, 2 or more amps would be needed. A stereo unit utilizing 47k ohms and a second unit utilizing 100k ohms for center and surrounds.

Thought this might be helpful!
Edited by Slinkee - 4/4/13 at 8:54pm
post #502 of 1445
Can anyone confirm that the crossover settings in the oppo menus will not affect speakers set to large?

i can't seem to get any output below 40hz from my L/R speakers. Ran a test tone disc and didn't hear anything.
post #503 of 1445
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigguyca View Post

Wolfson DAC Thoughts:

One advantage to the manufacturer who uses Wolfson DAC’s, such as the WM8740, is that Wolfson DAC’s supply a voltage out which provides significant cost reductions and saves board space. Higher quality units such as from ESS and Burr-Brown (pcm1792, pcm1795) have current outputs which require two high quality op amps per channel to convert to voltage but supply a higher quality output. This function is accomplished inside the Wolfson DAC. The OPPO units using the ESS DAC have a lot more circuitry after the DAC's (multi-channel or stereo) than you'll likely find with any Wolfson implementation. The OPPO units give better measured performance. The Wolfson WM8741 has better specs than the WM8740 but is still only voltage out.

Overall BDP-105 Thoughts:

To see the amazing measured performance of the BDP-105 make sure you go to the HI-Fi News website (UK), if you haven’t already, and then to the test results presented by Miller Audio. You'll have to register and get a password, but then looking at the January 1013 issue for the OPPO BDP-105 results you'll find some amazing numbers. Only the test results are presented, not the HI-FI written review so it may take a few minutes to understand what is there but they are amazing. The OPPO compares very favorably with the megabuck dCS Vivaldi Digital system whose measurements are in the February 2013 edition. The quality and thoroughness of Miller Audio’s work for HI-FI News to me makes it by far the best site for measurements on the web.

I've been using the BDP-105 as a preamp since I received it in December 2012. The audio sync issue through the HDMI inputs has been a real problem and aggravation, but the latest beta seems to fix that. Four months was an unacceptably long time to wait for a feature which is listed in OPPO's specs and promotional materials. I had another issue which seemed to relate to some component reacting to heat but a replacement unit has solved that issue.

I drive Anthem P5 amps with no problem using the balanced outputs and the RCA’s. The BDP-105 has a low output impedance (approx. 100 ohms for the balanced output). Assuming a similar number for the RCA’s the BDP-105 should have no problem driving any amplifier I’ve seen even if two channels are driven in parallel for bi-amping purposes.

When used for two channel music (usually classical or jazz) the OPPO-105 is truly excellent. (Revel Salon’s) The video quality is stunning.

One hassle with the BDP-105 is that the last input selected is not retained so if one is using say the HDMI input on the back and then powers off the unit, when again powered on the input is the Blu-Ray Player, not the real HDMI input. I suggested changing to OPPO tech support but was told it would be too confusing for tech support to trouble shoot units if the outputs were retained over power cycles. Personally I disagree with this view of how to evaluate potential features. I also suggested putting the input menu on the top menu and that was thought to have promise.

In summary the BDP-105 has been a frustrating unit for me. It has a great basic hardware design which has been somewhat marred by problematic firmware. The step to acting as a preamp replacement is incomplete. I would buy the BDP-105 again now, but I wish I had waited until now, given the overall issues and the one issue I had requiring replacement of my first unit.

Thank you,  Link?

post #504 of 1445
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slinkee View Post

Bigguyca,
What volume do you listen to on the oppo? I spoke with oppo tech support trying to figure out the best amp to run direct into the 105. They give the recommendation that the stereo amp have an input impedance of 47k ohms. If a stereo amp with an input impedance of 100k ohms is used, it could be too quiet even at 100 volume level on oppo. In the opposite direction, an input impedance of 22k or below might make the volume level too loud even at lower volume levels on the oppo.

Further info on output impedance of oppo 105: Front L/R (both dedicated and multichannel) are both 100 ohms, but remainder of multichannel (C,surrounds, etc.) are 200 ohms.

They said that for optimum use of direct connections, 2 or more amps would be needed. A stereo unit utilizing 47k ohms and a second unit utilizing 100k ohms for center and surrounds.

Thought this might be helpful!

one thing that they probably did not take into account is speaker sensitivity, my amps have 100k input impedance, but i do fine under 40 on my volume controls. i run AV123 LS6 speakers.
post #505 of 1445
Quote:
Originally Posted by ufokillerz View Post

Can anyone confirm that the crossover settings in the oppo menus will not affect speakers set to large?

i can't seem to get any output below 40hz from my L/R speakers. Ran a test tone disc and didn't hear anything.

It is hard to "hear" below 40Hz as human aural sensitivity is very poor and you have to turn up the gain a lot.  Better to measure it.

post #506 of 1445
Quote:
Originally Posted by ufokillerz View Post

one thing that they probably did not take into account is speaker sensitivity, my amps have 100k input impedance, but i do fine under 40 on my volume controls. i run AV123 LS6 speakers.
Oppo is currently driving Emotiva XPA-2 power amp (input impedance 33K on balanced inputs) and with -20db attenuators and my normal listening levels are around 60-70
post #507 of 1445

THis would be great on OPPO

 

"Dolby Atmos and the Science Behind New Age Audio Technology

APR 3 Written by: Lindsey Adler 4/3/2013 9:27 AM 

 

The movie theater is what a day in the office is like for top researchers at Dolby. On Tuesday, some of the audio innovator’s top scientists and executives led media in New York through a broad ranging program detailing some of their latest products, while also teasing some of the more top secret projects in the works for the future. The three-hour program was nothing short of fascinating from end to end, spanning markets as far ranging as residential and home theater to broadcast, cinemas, movie production for both audio and video, and even unified communications. The event—dubbed Dolby at the Labs—kicked off detailing the abstract fundamentals that much of Dolby’s audio technology is based off, as senior scientist Poppy Crum demonstrated multiple interactive optical and audio illusions. It was as if we were attending one of her lectures at Stanford, where she is a consulting professor for computer research in music and acoustics, teaching classes like “Neuroplasticity and Musical Gaming.”

 

She really coherently demonstrated how neurophysiology is the basis for how Dolby approaches its technology development, and it made perfect sense—from a business perspective for Dolby, and conceptually—that how our brains perceive and react to audio and video stimuli should drive the means for how we consume entertainment. Brett Crockett, senior director of research, sound technology, summed it up, saying, the more we understand the science, the more we can solve the problems. Dolby is “full of artists,” creating consumer experiences, Crockett said, an idea that was a constant theme as the day progressed to highlight some of the products they have released and are working on.

 

The event highlighted the one-year anniversary of Dolby’s Atmos cinema technology, which integrates overhead audio effects for truly the most immersive movie experience available. Once all the presentations and product demos wrapped—and a brief cocktail/cupcake anniversary celebration—the day culminated with a full feature screening of Danny Boyle’s new film, Trance, set for release Friday. Trance’s sound mixer Ian Tapp was on hand to discuss what it was like mixing Atmos in the film. He compared it to having “another flight of stairs you can use,” and “having two more gears in your car’s gearbox.” Unlike an event this past Fall demonstrating Atmos, there wasn’t much of an opportunity for the press to inquire about potential for Atmos in the home theater.

 

[My colleague Joe Palenchar at TWICE was able to zero in on an exec for some more details on this, boosted by comments from the Blu-ray Disc Association, which you can (and should) read here.]

 

Atmos could be a gigantic boon for home theater installers if the technology proves capable of development for home applications. Theoretically, it seems perfectly conceivable, but we are probably quite a ways from any solid movement in this direction. After watching a full feature film with Atmos, it is hands-down the most exciting and immersive movie experience to date. It is a must to experience Atmos in action for installers and consumers because it basically rewrites the movie watching experience. You can search for theaters featuring Atmos here. In just a year, over new 30 titles have been mixed with Atmos and over 90 cinemas worldwide have integrated the technology. After Trance opens nationally on Friday, Oblivion, starring Tom Cruise and Morgan Freeman, is set for release later in April. Some of the other technologies Dolby demonstrated included audio processing in mobile devices, like the Kindle Fire; glasses-free TV; a digital CRT reference monitor for video post production houses; and a conferencing software, Dolby Voice, that dramatically improves the quality of audio during conference calls.

post #508 of 1445

Dolby Atmos Coming Soon To A Home Theater?

Dolby Laboratories isn’t talking, but there don’t seem to be any major technical hurdles getting in the way of migrating the company’s Atmos surround-sound format from digital cinemas to home theaters in rather short order.

Atmos, launched in the digital-cinema market a year ago, has appeared in more than 30 theatrical releases, has gained the support of seven major Hollywood studios, and has been implemented in more than 90 movie theaters in 28 countries.

 In its current implementation in digital cinemas, Atmos delivers individual sounds (called sound objects) to up to 64 different speakers, including overhead speakers, though the technology supports up to 128 simultaneous sounds.

With current surround technologies, in contrast, professional sound mixers assign multiple sounds to an individual channel in a five-channel sound system. That process masks many of the sounds that enhance realism. With Atmos, sound studios attach specific X, Y, and Z coordinates to each sound to describe that sound’s location in three-dimensional space at any given time.

That frees movie studios from the limitations imposed by cramming many sounds into a limited number of discrete channels.

Combined with psycho-acoustic techniques, sound-object mixing creates a more life-like experience in which more individual sounds are heard clearly and distinctly. Sounds also pan more smoothly around you, and the surround experience is improved no matter where you sit.

The technology scales down for playback through cinemas with fewer than 64 speakers, and it scales down to home theater systems with far fewer speakers. In fact, Atmos could be embedded in an active soundbar to deliver surround-sound performance that exceeds that of current soundbars with various types of virtual-surround processing, I’m told.

Atmos can also be calibrated to work optimally in different-size rooms with different acoustic characteristics.

So the number of speakers is not an impediment to Atmos’s home-theater adoption. Now what about soundtrack sources?

Atmos soundtracks could be placed on Blu-ray discs right now and played back through existing Blu-ray players. The players would spit out the Atmos bitstream through their HDMI outputs to future A/V receivers with embedded Atmos decoders.

 No one is saying when those A/V receivers will be available, but there doesn’t seem to be any technical limitations that would prevent those receivers from becoming available sooner rather than later.

A/V receiver suppliers, however, likely won’t make a decision until they hear about the progress made by the Blu-ray Disc Association (BDA) in adding new technologies to the Blu-ray standard.

Last fall, the Blu-ray Disc Association (BDA) formed a task force called the "format extension study task force" to evaluate new technologies that might be added to the Blu-ray format.  The task force includes representatives from the, CE and IT communities.

 The task force is using three major criteria to determine whether a proposed technology, such as 4K, new audio codecs, expanded color space, high frame rate, and the like should be recommended for addition to the Blu-ray specifications, a BDA spokesman said.

They criteria are:

1) Technical feasibility. Will the proposed technology actually work with Blu-ray media?

2)  Expected market demand. Will enough consumers buy it to allow for a reasonable return on the investment?

3)  The technology’s impact on existing Blu-ray players. What would happen if a disc containing the new capability was inserted into a player that didn’t support it? Would it cause an undesirable effect, would the player decline to play it, or would existing players ignore the new feature entirely and play the disc as it usually would?

  “If the candidate technology can satisfy these three main areas of study, the task force can recommend to the board of directors that it be added to the specifications,” the BDA spokesman said.

 As for timing, the spokesman said, “It's very difficult to say exactly (or even roughly) when something tangible will come out of the process, but I think everyone involved is motivated to keep things moving as efficiently as possible.”

If BDA doesn’t let competing members’ interest get in the way, Atmos and DTS’s competing Multi-Dimensional Audio (MDA) format could soon make their way onto the next-generation of high-definition video disc.

 
 

Edited by wse - 4/5/13 at 4:09pm
post #509 of 1445
^ It would be really nice to start having more native 7.1 and DTS-NEO:X (2 movies currently) content available first before installing an overheard speaker system. smile.gif
post #510 of 1445
Quote:
Originally Posted by Slinkee View Post

Bigguyca,
What volume do you listen to on the oppo? I spoke with oppo tech support trying to figure out the best amp to run direct into the 105. They give the recommendation that the stereo amp have an input impedance of 47k ohms. If a stereo amp with an input impedance of 100k ohms is used, it could be too quiet even at 100 volume level on oppo. In the opposite direction, an input impedance of 22k or below might make the volume level too loud even at lower volume levels on the oppo.

Further info on output impedance of oppo 105: Front L/R (both dedicated and multichannel) are both 100 ohms, but remainder of multichannel (C,surrounds, etc.) are 200 ohms.

They said that for optimum use of direct connections, 2 or more amps would be needed. A stereo unit utilizing 47k ohms and a second unit utilizing 100k ohms for center and surrounds.

Thought this might be helpful!

I do not think an amp's input impedance would have much to do with the volume. The volume would be determined by the gain of the power amp.

Lower source (Oppo) output impedance and higher amp input impedance are generally a good thing leading to a flatter frequency response and particularly better bass. An amp with low input impedance is easier to drive, requiring less current from the source.
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