or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › Video Components › Home Theater Computers › Ethernet cable splitter
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Ethernet cable splitter - Page 2

post #31 of 84
Some newer Motorola modems (like the 6120) can act as a NAT (private IP) DHCP server for multiple devices. This feature is ONLY available if there is no Internet connection. If there is an Internet connection, machines will be assigned a public address by the cable company.

@ollyteddy, read carefully before you try it. wink.gif
Quote:
DHCP Server Enabled
The SURFboard cable modem can be used as a gateway to the Internet by a maximum of 32 users on a Local Area Network (LAN). When the Cable Modem disconnected from the Internet, users on the LAN can be dynamically assigned IP Addresses by the Cable Modem DHCP Server. These addresses are assigned from an address pool which begins with 192.168.100.11 and ends with 192.168.100.42. Statically assigned IP addresses for other devices on the LAN should be chosen from outside of this range
post #32 of 84
Yes, my Uverse 2Wire HDSL modem is also a router. But the Efficient Network ADSL modem before it was not a router. Both these modems can hold public IP addresses, be the network gateway and assign DHCP addresses. So what they can do depends on the model.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim McC View Post

Thanks guys. Yes, I do have a router. I have the Netgear 3700, gigabit router, with 4 ethernet ports.

Is there a maximum # of ports the ethernet switch can have(to work with my router)?

Other than buying a "gigabit router", what other features should I look for?

Normally within one segment of an ethernet network, the maximum number of devices thus ports is 256 (0-255). The number of DHCP (dynamic host client protocol) assignments is set in the DHCP host, e.g. 50-100 yields 51 devices, 50-250 yields 201 devices etc. DHCP host function is most commonly included in a router. But some time they can be included in a modem too. In a segment, there should only be one DHCP host. So if there are multiple routers in a single segment network, DHCP function should be turned off except one host.

I assign IP address 1-10 to routers and WiFi access points, 50-100 fixed IP addresses, 100-200 for DHCP assignments, 200-220 for printers, 250+ for storage devices such as NAS.

Prior to ethernet switches, there were boxes called ethernet hubs. Once two ports are talking, other ports are basically blocked. Switches were invented to get around this road block. Internally there is a chip called switching "fabric". A 4 ports switching fabric has 4 horizontal and 4 vertical lines. Where the lines cross is a switch point. For obvious reason each port can never switch to itself. The beauty of this design is that when port 1 is connected to port 4, port 2 can be connected to port 3 without compromising traffic between other ports. Once an end device is connected to a port, the switch knows the IP address on that port and switch traffic destined to that port. Once the data had past, the cross switch goes open again and waits for the next data. This is all there is to a basic ethernet switch design.
Edited by dksc318 - 1/16/13 at 12:38am
post #33 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by segmentor View Post

100Base-TX Ethernet (100Mbps) only uses 2 out of the 4 pairs so if you use the right kind of splitter (you'd need more than one) you would probably get away with it. 1000Base-T (1Gbps) uses all 4 pairs so can't be split. Either way it's not a standards compliant way of doing things.
....

I used my upstairs, downstairs single cable run for two 100Base-T also until changing over to gigE.
post #34 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by olyteddy View Post

Model Name: SB6120
Vendor Name: Motorola

I haven't tried it without a router because i have a couple of wireless things and therefore a wireless router. If I wasn't recording NCIS atm I'd go ahead and try it. Maybe later...

You don't have access to change the dhcp scope? Try typing your gateway address into your browser. The credentials are normally posted on the router somewhere.

Not true. Some ADSL modems are just that - modems. They will bridge the Internet traffic on to the Ethernet port but they will not route and will not support more than one directly connected PC unless they are connected to a router. That's a bit beside the point for this discussion however.

This is still a router it just isn't running NAT like mentioned above. That being said my earlier statement that if it has rj45 ports you can hook up a switch was wrong...
post #35 of 84
That's a slick modem. I have the same one. I don't see any log in credentials on the back of mine. I have a router too and never even considered using a modem as a router. As a matter of fact I've never even heard of this concept before.
post #36 of 84
Dat dere switch.... Get one.
post #37 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by pkscout View Post

In New York City you might try B&H Photo. It's not exactly a "small" store, but it is run buy a family that has been in the city for a long time. They have much more than photo equipment and usually have pretty good prices. They also have an online store, so you can at least see what kind of stuff they carry. It's worth noting that the family (and much of the staff) are Hasidic Jews, so the store is not open on Saturdays or Jewish holidays.

I'm quite familar with them (have a degree in photography), been shopping there for years. My biggest problem is that usually when I need to do something, its on a Saturday! They take that stuff pretty strict though, their online store isn't even open Saturdays.
post #38 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sammy2 View Post

That's a slick modem. I have the same one. I don't see any log in credentials on the back of ine. I have a router too and never even considered using a modem as a router. As a matter of fact I've never even heard of this concept before.

I have the same one as well. The admin page is 192.168.100.1/config.html

The DHCP routing is only available if your ISP allows multiple IPs on your account. Most only allow one at a time, but the LAN funtion could exist if you weren't connected to the internet.

Another useful reason to use a router and a modem is a basic level firewall and ping blocking

Surfboard tips
post #39 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dark_Slayer View Post

The DHCP routing is only available if your ISP allows multiple IPs on your account.

Seems to be a common misconception but not actually true. The DHCP server on the SurfBoards only come into play if your Internet is not connected/working. See my post #31 at the top of the page. Also from your link:

Quote:
DHCP Server

This should normally stay checked, so that the Surfboard provides a DHCP service for local use while the CATV service is not available. Disregard the sentence about being able act as a gateway for up to 32 PCs: most ISPs allow only one IP address to be alloatced in service.

Granted, it should have said "Cable Broadband" and not "CATV".
post #40 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sammy2 View Post

That's a slick modem. I have the same one. I don't see any log in credentials on the back of mine. I have a router too and never even considered using a modem as a router. As a matter of fact I've never even heard of this concept before.

There is a good chance your router supports ADSL2 and there is no reason for you to use the modem at all. I have never owned separate modem and routers(excluding 56k) and there is no reason for them to be separate except for your ISP to try and limit the number of people connected. I find it absurd that companies are still doing this.
post #41 of 84
There is a reason I run the SB6120..
post #42 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by macks View Post

There is a good chance your router supports ADSL2 and there is no reason for you to use the modem at all. I have never owned separate modem and routers(excluding 56k) and there is no reason for them to be separate except for your ISP to try and limit the number of people connected. I find it absurd that companies are still doing this.

I don't follow? Almost all high speed ISPs bring coax in the home. I've not seen a coax connection on a router.

How would you get from the curb to the computer otherwise?
post #43 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dark_Slayer View Post

I don't follow? Almost all high speed ISPs bring coax in the home. I've not seen a coax connection on a router.

How would you get from the curb to the computer otherwise?

Quoted the wrong post. If you have a coax line then you are not dealing with adsl2. There are docsis(coax) routers that you can get but most don't have this functionality built in.
post #44 of 84
Right, I understand a little more now. Learned something new. I never new there were dsl routers out there. Guess I never needed to look
post #45 of 84
Thread Starter 
If I may get this back on topic, I have a question.

Would the Netgear GS605 Gigabit ethernet switch be a good choice for me? Thanks.
post #46 of 84
Probably but the Trendnet one posted earlier costs half that.
post #47 of 84
The Trendnet's are inexpensive and have almost universally positive reviews. The 8-port one is actually amazon's best selling swtich. It seems like the obvious choice.
post #48 of 84
I have that very model (Trendnet 8-port) and have been very pleased with it.
post #49 of 84
I am not attracted to dumb switches. I'd rather buy a router and use it as a switch. If your main router dies, you always have another one to replace it. .
post #50 of 84
I have those trendnets in my network. I cannot see the reason to get a router and then disable it to act as a switch for the odd chance that your main router quits. I've never had a router, modem or switch quit in at least 15 years of wired home networking that I have been doing. I've upgraded them on my own accord but they have never quit. Not that one won't give out but just that it hasn't happened.
post #51 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by galileo2000 View Post

I am not attracted to dumb switches. I'd rather buy a router and use it as a switch. If your main router dies, you always have another one to replace it. .

Yeah, but won't you need to replace your 'switch' then? Makes no sense. If you need a router buy a router. If you need a switch by a switch. If you're that paranoid about your router randomly dying and needing to replace it immediately, keep a spare around.
post #52 of 84
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sammy2 View Post

Probably but the Trendnet one posted earlier costs half that.

The Netgear GS605 is only $2 more than the 5 port Trendnet one at Amazon. Is the Netgear one worth $2 more? Thanks.
post #53 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim McC View Post

The Netgear GS605 is only $2 more than the 5 port Trendnet one at Amazon. Is the Netgear one worth $2 more? Thanks.

The Trendnet is cheaper AND has better reviews, so again, why are you even considering the Netgear?
post #54 of 84
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by lockdown571 View Post

The Trendnet is cheaper AND has better reviews, so again, why are you even considering the Netgear?

I didn't look at the reviews close enough.

The Trendnet 5 port switch(TEG-S50g) is listed as "Unmanaged". What does that mean?
Edited by Jim McC - 1/16/13 at 11:26pm
post #55 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by lockdown571 View Post

Yeah, but won't you need to replace your 'switch' then? Makes no sense. If you need a router buy a router. If you need a switch by a switch. If you're that paranoid about your router randomly dying and needing to replace it immediately, keep a spare around.
Not sure I follow.
Basically every modern router can work as a switch, besides, there are some deals where N-routers w/USB port can be bought for $17 or so, cheaper than the switch.
Just recently I had to implement WDS between my rooms. Had I had the switch instead of the router, I'd be in trouble. With the router formerly working as a switch, I got WDS in no time.
But once again, my friend, to each his own, LOL.
post #56 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim McC View Post

I didn't look at the reviews close enough.

The Trendnet 5 port switch(TEG-S50g) is listed as "Unmanaged". What does that mean?

It means it has no management interface. Managed switches can support multiple VLANs, configurable Quality of Service (QoS) and will provide utilisation statistics among other things.
Most home networks don't need a managed switch.
Quote:
Originally Posted by galileo2000 View Post

Not sure I follow.
Basically every modern router can work as a switch, besides, there are some deals where N-routers w/USB port can be bought for $17 or so, cheaper than the switch.

Using just the switch functionality of a router is generally a bad idea for novice users as they'll run into trouble with DHCP, uPNP and other things.
post #57 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by galileo2000 View Post

Not sure I follow.
Basically every modern router can work as a switch, besides, there are some deals where N-routers w/USB port can be bought for $17 or so, cheaper than the switch.
Just recently I had to implement WDS between my rooms. Had I had the switch instead of the router, I'd be in trouble. With the router formerly working as a switch, I got WDS in no time.
But once again, my friend, to each his own, LOL.

N-router with a gig switch for $17(if you see this please pm me I could use one)? If not then you are comparing to the wrong thing. You are right that most routers use switched ports for everything but the WAN port. Segmentor is right that a switch is more user-friendly though. I have seen both switches and routers die.
post #58 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by segmentor View Post

Using just the switch functionality of a router is generally a bad idea for novice users as they'll run into trouble with DHCP, uPNP and other things.

Exactly, if you don't know what you're doing (like you don't disable DHCP), then you're going to mess up your network.

I appreciate the thorough discussions we have on AVSForum, but this has to be one the most ridiculous ones I've ever been involved in. The OP needs an gigabit ethernet switch. I posted the most popular one on amazon, which is inexpensive and has outstanding reviews. It will work. This really isn't complicated.
post #59 of 84
Quote:
This really isn't complicated.

This is AVS where the most in depth technical discussions are about...wire.
post #60 of 84
Quote:
Originally Posted by galileo2000 View Post

Not sure I follow.
Basically every modern router can work as a switch, besides, there are some deals where N-routers w/USB port can be bought for $17 or so, cheaper than the switch.
Just recently I had to implement WDS between my rooms. Had I had the switch instead of the router, I'd be in trouble. With the router formerly working as a switch, I got WDS in no time.
But once again, my friend, to each his own, LOL.

I have two 8-port gigabit switches. Both bought for around $20/each. No configuration. Plug and play.

I seriously doubt your $17 router has 8-port gigabit switch in it. For most ppl, like the OP, they really don't know how to disable the DHCP, UPnP and other features that will wreak havoc on their existing networks if they just use it as a switch. So, your advice in the context of thread is really a bad advice.

As for connection between rooms, I prefer Powerline adapters over anything wireless. They are just way more reliable than wifi.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Home Theater Computers
AVS › AVS Forum › Video Components › Home Theater Computers › Ethernet cable splitter