or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › Audio › Receivers, Amps, and Processors › Emotiva XMC-1
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Emotiva XMC-1

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
This might be a really stupid question but I'm new to this kind of stuff. Is the Emotiva XMC-1 like a receiver?
post #2 of 15
Yep. However, you will need separate amplifiers to power your speakers. The XMC-1 processes the sound/video and sends them to the amplifier that powers the speakers. An AV receiver processes sound and has an integrated amplifier.

That's a very expensive preamp though.
post #3 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by GaryWA View Post

Yep. However, you will need separate amplifiers to power your speakers. The XMC-1 processes the sound/video and sends them to the amplifier that powers the speakers. An AV receiver processes sound and has an integrated amplifier.

That's a very expensive preamp though.

It isn't expensive compared to many per/pros. The downside is nobody knows if this will be a quality product or not.

Sent from my Motorola Galaxy s3 using Tapatalk 2
post #4 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by flashman03 View Post

It isn't expensive compared to many per/pros. The downside is nobody knows if this will be a quality product or not.

Sent from my Motorola Galaxy s3 using Tapatalk 2

Or if it will be an actual product or not.
post #5 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Theresa View Post

Or if it will be an actual product or not.

What makes you say that with regards to the OP's question?
post #6 of 15
I seem to remember the Emotiva and the Outlaw pre's being vaporware for a while.
post #7 of 15
True. The XMC-1 is a much more ambitious product though and so far they don't have RC working on it (from what I've read on here). I am still hoping for Emotiva to get it out and get it right with an actual automated RC.
post #8 of 15
My deal with the XMC-1 is that it will be obsolete by the time it is finished. Marantz, Denon, etc. have a lot more resources to dump into creating a prepro. Something like the Marantz AV8801 is going to have a lot more features than the XMC-1, mainly support for an industry-standard room correction, like Audyssey, and more than 7.x channels along with their processing modes. If your cable runs are short like mine, less than three feet, then balanced connections between prepro and amp won't matter. A decent receiver with preamp outs will probably work just as well as the XMC-1 and amps. You'll have a much better selection if you choose a receiver with preamp outs over a prepro.

I'm not dogging Emotiva. I have an XPR-5, Airmotiv 5's, and plan on buying the Stealth 8's along with a UMC-200, DC-1, or Pre-1. They just have a poor track record as far as processors go because they don't have the resources to do a lot of complex R&D. Receivers, Preamps, and Processors are the most challenging products to develop. You have to orchestrate handfuls of electronics from different manufacturers and bang out a million lines of code in order to make it all work.
Edited by jevans64 - 1/25/13 at 2:23am
post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by jevans64 View Post

My deal with the XMC-1 is that it will be obsolete by the time it is finished. Marantz, Denon, etc. have a lot more resources to dump into creating a prepro. Something like the Marantz AV8801 is going to have a lot more features than the XMC-1, mainly support for an industry-standard room correction, like Audyssey, and more than 7.x channels along with their processing modes. If your cable runs are short like mine, less than three feet, then balanced connections between prepro and amp won't matter. A decent receiver with preamp outs will probably work just as well as the XMC-1 and amps. You'll have a much better selection if you choose a receiver with preamp outs over a prepro.

I'm not dogging Emotiva. I have an XPR-5, Airmotiv 5's, and plan on buying the Stealth 8's along with a UMC-200, DC-1, or Pre-1. They just have a poor track record as far as processors go because they don't have the resources to do a lot of complex R&D. Receivers, Preamps, and Processors are the most challenging products to develop. You have to orchestrate handfuls of electronics from different manufacturers and bang out a million lines of code in order to make it all work.

With Audyssey DSX2 and HDMI 2.0 around the corner this year that is true for everything out there now, no?
OEMs need to eat, so "new and must have" features need to come out on a regular 6 month basis. rolleyes.gif

When do you stop? confused.gif

I get that sources should turn around regularly (not every 6 months) to keep up with new formats, audio gear really shouldn't but the OEM have figured out a way to do so and have made good $$$ at it.

Think about it for a moment.
An AVR from 2005 should still be good in a modern HT is you have say an oppo.
If you need internet streaming or airplay, those can be has for $50 (roku)-100(airport) as an add on vs $3K for an AVP upgrade.

Look at some of the high end players. Parasound is analog only because they assume you are doing this very same thing.
post #10 of 15
Great point boatman...the constant drive to update can be frustrating. An Apple TV can equip any HDMI capable receiver with AirPlay, so I could not figure out why people were paying ungodly sums a year or so ago just to get an Airplay enabled AVR...prices have come down now, but...

I'm milking everything I can out of my Outlaw 1070!
post #11 of 15
The driving force force for many of these standards changes and features is to get you to change your gear. For the most part much of the basic audio functionality has been present since HDMI 1.1. I personally do not upgrade my audio gear for every change in specification that happens. There is also equipment that can be used to keep your audio gear and yet move to a different video standard.

Expecting any audio electronic product to do true room acoustics correction is wildly optimistic. Poor room acoustics is like having excessive light in a front projection system. Expecting some electronics in the projector to fix this is lacking understanding of the problem. Excessive room reverberation will mask the sound clarity and alter the ambient effect built-in to the recording. Electronics will not fix this. The best audio electronics can do in the face of equipment and room physics is get the channel level, phase and frequency response reasonable. Unfortunately, the automatic systems generally are not very good at even those things. The more correction you insert into the system the more likely you are to degrade the audio quality of the source. I believe an intelligent parsimonious approach to sound adjustment that takes into account your situation will likely yield much better results on average than a stupid computer program that uses a fixed set of logic, cheap microphone and a large number of parameters to attempt to fix all of your audio problems in an array of equations.

The exciting thing about the new Emotiva preamp processors is that the most recent units appear to have no severe software bugs along with great sound quality and extreme user flexibility. This is unlike Denon, Onkyo, Marantz and Integra products that provide only simple graphic equalizers when you find that Audyssey did an inadequate job. The new preamps from Emotiva appear to be very similar to the best unit I work on the Classe SSP-800 in providing full parametric equalization of each channel. They also seem to have easy control of user modes that tends to elude many other manufacturers.

I personally have one of these on preorder and expect to be using it for years to come if it turns out as good as I expect.
post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by umr View Post

The driving force force for many of these standards changes and features is to get you to change your gear. For the most part much of the basic audio functionality has been present since HDMI 1.1. I personally do not upgrade my audio gear for every change in specification that happens. There is also equipment that can be used to keep your audio gear and yet move to a different video standard.

Expecting any audio electronic product to do true room acoustics correction is wildly optimistic. Poor room acoustics is like having excessive light in a front projection system. Expecting some electronics in the projector to fix this is lacking understanding of the problem. Excessive room reverberation will mask the sound clarity and alter the ambient effect built-in to the recording. Electronics will not fix this. The best audio electronics can do in the face of equipment and room physics is get the channel level, phase and frequency response reasonable. Unfortunately, the automatic systems generally are not very good at even those things. The more correction you insert into the system the more likely you are to degrade the audio quality of the source. I believe an intelligent parsimonious approach to sound adjustment that takes into account your situation will likely yield much better results on average than a stupid computer program that uses a fixed set of logic, cheap microphone and a large number of parameters to attempt to fix all of your audio problems in an array of equations.

The exciting thing about the new Emotiva preamp processors is that the most recent units appear to have no severe software bugs along with great sound quality and extreme user flexibility. This is unlike Denon, Onkyo, Marantz and Integra products that provide only simple graphic equalizers when you find that Audyssey did an inadequate job. The new preamps from Emotiva appear to be very similar to the best unit I work on the Classe SSP-800 in providing full parametric equalization of each channel. They also seem to have easy control of user modes that tends to elude many other manufacturers.

I personally have one of these on preorder and expect to be using it for years to come if it turns out as good as I expect.

Will be anxious to get your review!!!
post #13 of 15
Emotiva is going to be In Naperville, IL tomorrow for their roadshow, I am expecting that they will have this unit on demo. I will take pictures and report what I uncover. Helps that the tickets are free and it's 5 minutes from my house:D
post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by rcos View Post

Emotiva is going to be In Naperville, IL tomorrow for their roadshow, I am expecting that they will have this unit on demo. I will take pictures and report what I uncover. Helps that the tickets are free and it's 5 minutes from my house:D

How did it go?
post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by bootman_head_fi View Post

With Audyssey DSX2 and HDMI 2.0 around the corner this year that is true for everything out there now, no?
OEMs need to eat, so "new and must have" features need to come out on a regular 6 month basis. rolleyes.gif

When do you stop? confused.gif

I get that sources should turn around regularly (not every 6 months) to keep up with new formats, audio gear really shouldn't but the OEM have figured out a way to do so and have made good $$$ at it.

Think about it for a moment.
An AVR from 2005 should still be good in a modern HT is you have say an oppo.
If you need internet streaming or airplay, those can be has for $50 (roku)-100(airport) as an add on vs $3K for an AVP upgrade.

Look at some of the high end players. Parasound is analog only because they assume you are doing this very same thing.

I don't really think that most people rush out and sell their equipment to buy something with such trivial upgrades. At what point is it enough? Probably by one's own financial means and personal satisfaction. If someone does have the means to pay for every new sound mode or whatever then who cares, it's their money to spend however they feel it suits them. All it means in the end is that there are more opportunities for people in the market to choose from. In the case of Emotiva it isn't that the UMC or XMC won't be usable or obsolete, but when other companies can put out reliable models to every ambiguous one of Emotiva's you have to look at patience vs value as well. I waited for damn near two years for the UMC to find out that the EmoQ sounded worse than if I had just started from scratch, clueless on my own. After reserving the XMC and seeing it is following the same delayed path as the UMC I decided I wasn't entirely happy and would be canceling and not going through the same lengthy process to be disappointed in the end. Why not buy something that offers more and is available now?

I hope that the XMC is a great processor for those who are waiting. Some of Emotiva's stuff can be a great buy and awesome value from what I understand, but at the frustrating price of snail-like development and lesser resources than leading name companies. It's really each person's own needs when it comes down to it.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Receivers, Amps, and Processors
AVS › AVS Forum › Audio › Receivers, Amps, and Processors › Emotiva XMC-1