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65' Inch Plasma Mounted on ONE Stud ?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Hey everyone, first time poster here so don't kill me if this is in the wrong section or I sound like an idiot. I did my research, but couldn't find anything on my particular situation.

So heres my conundrum. I'd like to use an articulating wall mount (that I already purchased) for my Panasonic Viera 65" VT50. The wall that I'm mounting this TV too is 63 inches wide, and the TV itself is approximately 59" wide <- I know, a little overkill, but I wanted a big TV and this is literally the only place that it can go.

My problem is, with how the studs are spaced (16") and the overall width of the wall, unless the articulating wall mount I use has a back plate or mounting plate that is 32-33" wide, I won't be able to have TV securely mounted to 2 studs <- which is ofcourse a no go. Not to mention, I've been looking for an articulating wall mount for a 65" TV with a 30'+ back plate and I can't find them anywhere, Yet I can find them that wide in the fixed - tilt only setup all day.

BUUUUUT, something I just discovered is that the way this one particular wall is setup is there is the 1/2 thick sheet of dry wall, then a 3/8 slab / plank / sheet of wood that spans the entire wall, and then the studs behind that ofcourse. So it goes Sheetrock, 3/8 slab of wood, then studs

Given that the TV weighs apprx 98lbs according to Panasonic, could I get away with two lag bolts (top and bottom) securing the TV mount to the one stud it can hit, and then use something else to secure the rest of the mount in multiple spots to the 3/8 thick slab off wood thats between the drywall and the studs? I can't help but think the 3/8 piece of wood could do the job if its being anchored into multiple times in multiple spots, and a decent part of the weight or strain is picked-up by the two lag bolts into the stud.

If the above can't work, then I'll simply have to go with the flat mount setup with the tilt option... unless anyone knows of a place that sells the articulating mount with a 30" back plate. Or I can always open up the wall..... which I would love to avoid at all costs.

Any thoughts ? And thanks in advance for any help or ideas you send my way
post #2 of 16
I mounted my 60 inch Elite like that. Hit the stud with two lag bolts and then used 4 toggle bolts in the dry wall. No problems.
post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 
Wow, Really ?

And on the toggle bolts, were you just securing those to drywall, or did you have a large piece of plywood behind your drywall before the studs like mine ?
post #4 of 16
post #5 of 16
Thread Starter 
* deleted
Edited by vvlf - 1/25/13 at 10:08am
post #6 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thanks, I literally just stumbled across another thread that was suggesting to use the same thing. One thing I can't wrap my head around is how the toggler setup can supposedly hold more than twice the weight of the Moen setup, which appears to be a far beefier setup...

http://www.moen.com/securemount
post #7 of 16
Articulating 65"? Even with the plywood, I'd still have concerns. The downward force on this mount will be a lot more than 100 lbs.

How do you know the thickness of the plywood? Was the guy who installed it reliable? Was it put there for this purpose? Why is only 1 stud in this wall? Are other studs hiding behind the plywood?
post #8 of 16
I did like the fellas above with 2 lags and 2 toggles on each side. My calculations showed the lags would be enough for the weight, but did the toggles for added security.

But I agree with Neurorad. using this with an articulating mount scares me. I put my old 43" Plasma in my bedroom with the articulating mount, but was able to hit two studs. I used this Monoprice mount
http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=108&cp_id=10828&cs_id=1082806&p_id=6200&seq=1&format=2

And the TV is off to the side a hair, similar to what you're dealing with. Unless I'm misunderstanding this 63" wall, wouldn't a mount like I used work?
post #9 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Neurorad View Post

Articulating 65"? Even with the plywood, I'd still have concerns. The downward force on this mount will be a lot more than 100 lbs.

How do you know the thickness of the plywood? Was the guy who installed it reliable? Was it put there for this purpose? Why is only 1 stud in this wall? Are other studs hiding behind the plywood?

The previous home owners had port holes to chase the HDMI cables etc through the wall at the top and bottom, so it was easy / clear to see the layer and thickness of the drywall as well as the plywood beneath it.

Apparently this sheet of plywood is something they did to all the "media walls" in the group of townhouses I live in.

And there isn't only one stud in this wall, but in order to achieve proper centered placement with a gigantic tv that takes up the entire wall, and the 16" spread between the studs, I would need a mount setup where the mounting or supporting back-plate that secures to the wall is 32" wide to reach from stud to stud due to how the studs are positioned. A back plate of 16-24" simply wont make it. After doing some research on the forum, this is apparently a pretty common problem with a tight tolerance setup like this
post #10 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NickTheGreat View Post

I did like the fellas above with 2 lags and 2 toggles on each side. My calculations showed the lags would be enough for the weight, but did the toggles for added security.

But I agree with Neurorad. using this with an articulating mount scares me. I put my old 43" Plasma in my bedroom with the articulating mount, but was able to hit two studs. I used this Monoprice mount
http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=108&cp_id=10828&cs_id=1082806&p_id=6200&seq=1&format=2

And the TV is off to the side a hair, similar to what you're dealing with. Unless I'm misunderstanding this 63" wall, wouldn't a mount like I used work?

Unfortunately with the placement of the studs, their spacing, the lack of space i have to work with on the wall (about 1.5"-2" on each side), without a 32" backplate on the mount it just isn't possible.

The interesting thing is that the Co. that produces the Togglers, claim that their setup alone can work for an articulating mount-setup <- and thats not with the assumption that a bulk of the support is divided between lag bolts going into studs, and the togglers having plywood and not sheetrock to grab onto. I'm thinking if I do the Lags, the togglers, and torque everything down with a torque wrench so that everything is mounted with equal pressure/force and the weight is being distributed equally, I should be okay. Sounds like its time to put this theory to the test.

One thing I wish I could figureout is how close is too close to space the togglers, It can't bee good to have 20 1/2" toggler holes right in a row biggrin.gif

And the only reason I want to use the articulating mount is so that I can angle the tv literally just an inch or two on the left side so that it flows with the connecting wall better. I never plan to actually pull this massive 65" beast a couple of feet form the wall like the mount allows.
post #11 of 16
As has been mentioned, once you pull that 100 pound TV one to two feet off the wall and start swinging it around, the moment acting on the mounting location will be much greater than the weight of the TV.

Personally, I would bolt the mount to a 3/4 inch piece of plywood painted the same color as the wall that spans at least two studs. Then lag bolt that to the studs. You could even add a little quarter round to dress up the edge if necessary, but I assume that the TV will cover it. You may be able to get away with anchors, but better safe than sorry.

Edit: I see now that you don't plan on pulling the TV far off the wall, but that could always change in the future. I'd still go for a stronger mounting method than anchors. That's a big investment hanging on the wall.
Edited by aaustin - 1/25/13 at 10:55am
post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by vvlf View Post

Unfortunately with the placement of the studs, their spacing, the lack of space i have to work with on the wall (about 1.5"-2" on each side), without a 32" backplate on the mount it just isn't possible.

The interesting thing is that the Co. that produces the Togglers, claim that their setup alone can work for an articulating mount-setup <- and thats not with the assumption that a bulk of the support is divided between lag bolts going into studs, and the togglers having plywood and not sheetrock to grab onto. I'm thinking if I do the Lags, the togglers, and torque everything down with a torque wrench so that everything is mounted with equal pressure/force and the weight is being distributed equally, I should be okay. Sounds like its time to put this theory to the test.

One thing I wish I could figureout is how close is too close to space the togglers, It can't bee good to have 20 1/2" toggler holes right in a row biggrin.gif

And the only reason I want to use the articulating mount is so that I can angle the tv literally just an inch or two on the left side so that it flows with the connecting wall better. I never plan to actually pull this massive 65" beast a couple of feet form the wall like the mount allows.

The mount I lnked is wide enough to hit two studs. And I'm doing exactly what you say, I am using the mount to really just shift the TV over a foot or so.

Maybe we need a picture of the wall and show us where the studs are smile.gif
post #13 of 16
Meh. You guys are making way too much about this. Snap Toggles, Moens and these: http://www.wingits.com/Fastening-Systems_c_7.html are used all day every day in life support applications. I should think that if these types of anchor are good enough to protect GrandMa from a fall in the shower they are suitable to hold up a TV...
post #14 of 16
If you only have a single stud I'd likely drill some additional holes in the mount if they are not there already and sink 2 lag bolts offset from each other into the stud - one as far as it will go left and another as far as it will go right. That way the lag bolts will pull against each other. Then use molly bolts in the other mounting locations. You will be fine. If you are paranoid you can open up the sheetrock directly behind the mount and put in another 2x4 screwed into the other one and then you will be able to get 2.25" or so laterally between the lags The key is the double offset lag. I've used this for TVs and projectors with cineslides.
post #15 of 16
Thread Starter 
Problem Solved.

I was using this type of mount setup.
http://www.sanus.com/us/en/products/visionmount/full-motion-mount/VLF410
This setup does not allow you to slide the entire tv over or offset it to one side of the mount. So the mount has to be centered on the wall if you want a balanced centered look for your TV location <- which was a problem for my specific application because when the mount was in the center of the wall, the closest stud lined up dead center in the middle of the mount. Which meant the next closest stud for securing the second mounting point was 16 inches to the left or right. So without a backplate that was 32" inches wide to reach two studs at one time due to my wall/stud setup in conjunction with using this type of mount, I had to look into backboards, togglers, etc


If you go with a mount like this from Sanus, http://www.sanus.com/us/en/products/visionmount/full-motion-mount/XF228
you can put the mounting plate off to one side of the wall (in my case so that I can hit two studs instead of one), and then snap in the arms and slide the TV counter to the offset mount so that the TV is centered perfectly on the wall. No need for togglers, moen anchors, back boards, tearing out drywall, or new studs.


Unfortunately this was just one of those instances of where I didn't know what I didn't know. And I simply had no clue such a mount existed. But with everyones help and muuuuuch browsing on the site,.. and calling stanus, I found exactly what I needed

Thanks again everybody !!!
Edited by vvlf - 1/25/13 at 1:27pm
post #16 of 16
Good to hear.

If there is ever a concern about an articulating mount, do your best to install properly.

Then, before attaching the TV, hang on the mount. Try to rip it out. If it comes out, you need more blocking.

You don't want some neighbor's child getting hurt swinging on the TV.
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