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Totally Confused about ethernet

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
After reading on this forum, I can say that I am really confused. New home and having ethernet jacks in most rooms. also putting in a structured wiring panel.
I have many questions, so I'll try to organize the questions as best I can.
1) in a system as described, can you plug the cable modem into any ethernet jack in the house and then are
all of the other jacks active?

2) If I put the modem in the structured box, can I then connect my wireless router up to any jack in the house and have it active?

My next questions concern tv and a single pair of outdoor patio speakers. My plan would be to use a Sonos system, but would like to have the tv play through floor-standing speakers in the family room, but also be used for music from the sonos, and have the patio speakers also work with the music (will have a volume control on patio). Is there anyway to control these speakers with the Sonos?
Totally confused on best way to set this up. My thoughts are that a sonos connect amp could be used in the FR for both the tv and music and run the output from the sonos amp to a niles switchbox (which I have from my old house). The wires for the patio speakers are dropped into the FR (these are the only wired spkrs in the house).
Guess, I should have actually thought this out more than I did, before having it wired.
Any help would be much appreciated.
Thanks
post #2 of 12
Borrowed from a quick Google/Bing/Almost any search engine search.

"To connect more than one computer to the Internet, you need a router. A router allows you to connect several computers to each other and to the Internet. The router sits between your computers and the modem provided by your ISP. You connect the router to the modem, and then connect all your computers to the router.



Diagram showing how a desktop computer and a laptop access the Internet through a wired connection



To connect a router and multiple computers to the Internet

Contact an Internet service provider (ISP) and have them configure an Internet connection to your home. If possible, have the ISP place the modem in the room with your primary computer.

If you currently have a computer connected directly to your modem: Unplug the network cable from the back of your computer, and plug it into the port labeled Internet, WAN, or WLAN on the back of your router.
If you don't currently have your computer connected to the Internet: Plug one end of a network cable (included with your router) into your modem, and the other end of the network cable into the Internet, WAN, or WLAN port on your router.
Plug in your router. After a minute or two, the Internet, WAN, or WLAN light on your router should light up, indicating that it has successfully connected to your modem. "
Tried to clean up some, picts from other site didn't paste through.
Edited by jkxmlr - 1/25/13 at 7:38pm
post #3 of 12
And I'll elaborate some. The structured wiring cabinet can be the place that has the modem and router. You can even use a larger switch after the router if you have more lines that you want active. You can also use the data outlets throughout to connect wireless AP's and have greater coverage for wireless. Or if only one outlet is near your media center with multiple devices that can use network connectivity, put a switch there also.
post #4 of 12
Generally you might be better off (and is very common) to have a wireless modem/router in one package.
It will usually have 4 wired ports to plug into your cables throughout the house, then other devices will connect wirelessly.

And in relation to all devices working when you plug the cable in - they won't work in series if I'm reading the question right, so each wired device needs to terminate at the modem/router.

Also, for scenarios like an AV rack, you can run just 1 gigabit cable to the room, and then use a network switch to then have 2 or more devices connect to the router through the one cable.
post #5 of 12
Your Ethernet questions have been answered, so I'll tackle the rest of your post. (and in the future, totally unrelated topics like this should be in separate posts)
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmunster2 View Post

My next questions concern tv and a single pair of outdoor patio speakers. My plan would be to use a Sonos system, but would like to have the tv play through floor-standing speakers in the family room, but also be used for music from the sonos, and have the patio speakers also work with the music (will have a volume control on patio). Is there anyway to control these speakers with the Sonos? Totally confused on best way to set this up. My thoughts are that a sonos connect amp could be used in the FR for both the tv and music and run the output from the sonos amp to a niles switchbox (which I have from my old house). The wires for the patio speakers are dropped into the FR (these are the only wired spkrs in the house).

Since the patio speakers are wired to the family room, the simplest route is to use an AVR with Zone2 support, and use a Sonos Connect (not the amp version) as a source to the AVR. Then you can listen to any source, including the Sonos, in both locations. If you don't have an AVR, you might be happy with just a modern network-enabled 7.1-channel AVR. Those will have Pandora, Internet Radio, Airplay, etc. so you can get a lot of the Sonos functionality (not all, but a really good start). The 7.1 AVRs would be the choice as these are the ones that typically allow the choice of either 7-channel surround, or 5-channel surround plus a Zone2 amp.
Quote:
Guess, I should have actually thought this out more than I did, before having it wired.

Yes, coming here and learning before the house is complete would have opened a lot of possibilities...

Flip the house for a profit, and build a new one. Oh, wait, that won't work, dammit - it's not 2007 anymore. wink.gif

Jeff
post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jautor View Post

Your Ethernet questions have been answered, so I'll tackle the rest of your post. (and in the future, totally unrelated topics like this should be in separate posts)
Since the patio speakers are wired to the family room, the simplest route is to use an AVR with Zone2 support, and use a Sonos Connect (not the amp version) as a source to the AVR. Then you can listen to any source, including the Sonos, in both locations. If you don't have an AVR, you might be happy with just a modern network-enabled 7.1-channel AVR. Those will have Pandora, Internet Radio, Airplay, etc. so you can get a lot of the Sonos functionality (not all, but a really good start). The 7.1 AVRs would be the choice as these are the ones that typically allow the choice of either 7-channel surround, or 5-channel surround plus a Zone2 amp.


Yes, coming here and learning before the house is complete would have opened a lot of possibilities...

Flip the house for a profit, and build a new one. Oh, wait, that won't work, dammit - it's not 2007 anymore. wink.gif

Jeff

Jeff, thanks for the info, BUT, the thing with the AV receiver is that (my wife) would have to figure out how to set the avr for tv or music, and if she wanted music, also have to set it for the sonos-I've gone through this route with programmable (URC) remote-the macros always get fouled up.. Is there an ipad remote app that can integrate a receiver and the sonos in one app? I know some receivers are set up for apple (Pioneer, denon), but would we still have to have a separate app for the sonos, or is the connect always powered up and then we would just have to change the input on the avr??
Thanks again
post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmunster2 View Post

Jeff, thanks for the info, BUT, the thing with the AV receiver is that (my wife) would have to figure out how to set the avr for tv or music, and if she wanted music, also have to set it for the sonos

If you want multiple sources (TV and sonos), there's no getting around the need to switch sources. But tying indoor and outdoor 'zones' together without individual controls is a bad idea - which is why I suggested a Zone2-capable AVR.
Quote:
I've gone through this route with programmable (URC) remote-the macros always get fouled up..

Then use a Harmony. There's no reason for macros to get fouled up with modern equipment that has discrete codes. We're talking about a two-step macro here (power, source select), nothing uber-complex.
Quote:
Is there an ipad remote app that can integrate a receiver and the sonos in one app? I know some receivers are set up for apple (Pioneer, denon), but would we still have to have a separate app for the sonos,

Separate app, or you get into iRule and I can't recommend that solution here...
Quote:
is the connect always powered up and then we would just have to change the input on the avr??

The Sonos Connect unit is always on.
post #8 of 12
Back to the Ethernet for one quick tidbit. If your modem is already in a room, you can put the router there. Run a cable from the router to your PC and another cable goes from the router to the RJ45 in the wall. In the panel, install a switch (either 5 or 8-port) to feed the rest of your outlets.
post #9 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jautor View Post

If you want multiple sources (TV and sonos), there's no getting around the need to switch sources. But tying indoor and outdoor 'zones' together without individual controls is a bad idea - which is why I suggested a Zone2-capable AVR.
Then use a Harmony. There's no reason for macros to get fouled up with modern equipment that has discrete codes. We're talking about a two-step macro here (power, source select), nothing uber-complex.
Separate app, or you get into iRule and I can't recommend that solution here...
The Sonos Connect unit is always on.

Let me ask you this-forgetting the patio speakers for now (maybe put them on their own sonos amp), can I switch inputs on the sonos amp between internet music and a tv input, on my ipad or iphone?
I noticed that the audio ins are analog, and not sure if my tv has analog outs, or just the audio return channel optical output. Just trying to think of all possible options. I still don't really want the 2 zone avr because, even if I have the macro set for tv viewing and music (via sonos), we have to use a separate remote for that and then use the ipad for music selection and getting around on Pandora or internet radio. Trying to find a better solution, if one is available.
Any thoughts
post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by hmunster2 View Post

Let me ask you this-forgetting the patio speakers for now (maybe put them on their own sonos amp), can I switch inputs on the sonos amp between internet music and a tv input, on my ipad or iphone?

Yes, there's really not many controls on a Sonos except through the app interface...
Quote:
I noticed that the audio ins are analog, and not sure if my tv has analog outs, or just the audio return channel optical output. Just trying to think of all possible options. I still don't really want the 2 zone avr because, even if I have the macro set for tv viewing and music (via sonos), we have to use a separate remote for that and then use the ipad for music selection and getting around on Pandora or internet radio. Trying to find a better solution, if one is available.
Any thoughts

An AVR with Internet Radio / Pandora / etc. support will also have an on-screen interface, so you could use that on the same remote, and avoid the app altogether for zone1. But then you could use Zone2 and the AVR's app on your phone for control outside...
post #11 of 12
Thread Starter 
Thanks Jautor
post #12 of 12
1. Terminate all network cables in the closet/basement with the appropriate connectors (based on your wiring) in a patch panel. This is just a flat piece of metal with lots of Cat5e or Cat6 connectors built in.
2. Each connector in your patch panel corresponds to a wire that will carry signal to a particular port in a specific room
3. Buy a good switch that has enough ports for the number of active connections you will have. Note that a switch is different than a hub - it is better at routing traffic within your network.
4. Switch connects to a router and must be in the wiring closet
5. Router connects to your cable modem or other WAN (outside Internet) connection
6. Cable modem (or other WAN connection) should be in the wiring closet

Cable modem converts from the outside transport (cable, DSL) to nice, pure, TCP/IP over Cat5/6. It also obtains an IP address from the ISP which represents your network.

Router manages packets across a network and assigns IP addresses. It lets a bunch of computers appear as one to the outside.

Switch allows large numbers of devices on a single network to share data and to share the connection to the Internet.

When you decide you want a live port in one of your rooms, you go to the wiring closet, find the port on the patch panel that is labeled for that room, then run a short Ethernet cable (called a patch cord) between the switch and the patch panel to "activate' that port.

Your router does not have to be in the wiring closet, though I like it there. You can plug wireless into any of your new ports in the house.
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