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Why I bought a plasma with burn in and how to sleep better at night

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
Like the manual transmission, plasma seems to be the ill-fated, but superior technology. I wanted to relay a recent experience that might unclinch some toes of prospective plasma owners.

I have owned countless plasmas of numerous manufacturers from Pioneer to Vizio. Samsung and Panasonic have been my manufacturers of choice and i have never had a reliability issue with either. Some buzz to varying degree, but I have found reliability to be superior to their LCD equivalents.

While at BestBuy, i did my usual clearance item dumpster-diving and found an open box Panasonic TC-P50GT50 for a good price. The home theater rep warned me that i had "burn-in"...in fact someone appears to have watched PBS kids shows heavily, rendering slightly lighter rectangles outside of the 4:3 area and an "E/I" logo in the upper right side. Big Bird dominated this plasma.

I checked the hours and it had roughly 160 hours, which is all but virginal in my book. I took it home and displayed an inverse image of a 4:3 box on a break-out slide. It alternated light gray to white for the outer boxes and dark gray to black for the middle. I used MS paint to create a dull circle of the logo that remaind black the entire time.

After roughly 36 hours of "treatment," the "burn-in was all but gone on green screens. 24 hours later it was entirely gone.

The "burn-in" probably would have faded on its own over time with just regular viewing, but I figured i would experiment with a method i had used in the past.

Hopefully this gives people some more confidence that while image retention can be vexxing, it is far from a permanent phenomena unless you really, really abuse a display.
post #2 of 7
Ha ha...as an ex SCCA road racer I somewhat miss the driver's input of heel/toe and double clutching ( I wonder if these terms even come up on wiki?) a "4 Speed"
tranny...but must admit 6-8 automatic gears controlled by a nanosecond response paddle shifter will beat human input any day....
Congratulations on your Best Buy dumpster find and your success in reversing the IR/"burn" in so quickly. Regarding the method of treatment you employed here, have you had similar results in the past? I just pulled the trigger on a VT 50 (Chris at Cleveland Plasma shameless plug) which will arrive tomorrow. I have read testimonies all over the map regarding break in procedures to help mitigate potential IR/burn in issues on this panel. I appreciate your input on this subject and I am encouraged to hear that your
"treatment" worked so well on the GT after others had apparently assumed it was a permanent flaw...

Thanks
post #3 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Artsontop View Post

Ha ha...as an ex SCCA road racer I somewhat miss the driver's input of heel/toe and double clutching ( I wonder if these terms even come up on wiki?) a "4 Speed"
tranny...but must admit 6-8 automatic gears controlled by a nanosecond response paddle shifter will beat human input any day....
Congratulations on your Best Buy dumpster find and your success in reversing the IR/"burn" in so quickly. Regarding the method of treatment you employed here, have you had similar results in the past? I just pulled the trigger on a VT 50 (Chris at Cleveland Plasma shameless plug) which will arrive tomorrow. I have read testimonies all over the map regarding break in procedures to help mitigate potential IR/burn in issues on this panel. I appreciate your input on this subject and I am encouraged to hear that your
"treatment" worked so well on the GT after others had apparently assumed it was a permanent flaw...

Thanks

From what I have read that's somewhat of a misconception, there is no break-in method that will help make your panel more IR resistant. Technically, running the break-in slides for 100 hours is only supposed to be used if you want to replicate D-Nice's results (or another user/calibrator's). It's the same exact method he uses, and will help age the phosphors evenly, ensuring your picture will look as close to his as possible when you dial in the settings. By design your TV is more susceptible to IR in the first 100-200 hours, but the method of break-in used won't change whether or not you are more/less likely to get IR in the future. You can start watching your TV right out of the box and begin breaking it in. Use a slightly lower contrast setting and be mindful of leaving static images on the screen for too long and you should be just fine.
post #4 of 7
Great share. I'm convinced that a lot of less experienced plasma owners are probably reporting IR as burn-in. It's an interesting technique that you used.

Doesn't it seem possible that a plasma could be built with a voltage or capacitance check to identify its own retention and build its own inverse image? I don't know enough to know whether that's a coherent question but my intuition leads me in that direction.

Also, the WoW disc has a pixel flipper pattern that seems like it should be way more effective than the typical built-in scrolling bars. Its relatively low maximum brightness also makes me think it probably ages the phosphors less, overall, than the scrolling bars (although this could be an optical illusion). Can anyone verify?
post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SaviorMachine View Post

Great share. I'm convinced that a lot of less experienced plasma owners are probably reporting IR as burn-in. It's an interesting technique that you used.

Doesn't it seem possible that a plasma could be built with a voltage or capacitance check to identify its own retention and build its own inverse image? I don't know enough to know whether that's a coherent question but my intuition leads me in that direction.

Also, the WoW disc has a pixel flipper pattern that seems like it should be way more effective than the typical built-in scrolling bars. Its relatively low maximum brightness also makes me think it probably ages the phosphors less, overall, than the scrolling bars (although this could be an optical illusion). Can anyone verify?

Totally agree. No idea re the self sensing phosphors...sounds like a lot of cost for little benefit.
post #6 of 7
160 hours isn't that much, so I wouldn't expect burn-in (which would be permanent). If it was 1,600 hours, that would be different IMO.
Edited by TheAnswer_03 - 2/4/13 at 6:41pm
post #7 of 7
I had a problem with my set... I guess my kids watched on the wrong display format and had bars along the sides. I don't watch TV that much so I just noticed it...and then noticed I had image retension / burn-in.

The TV is only 3 months old and it is top of the lind Panny 65VT50. I was PISSED.

I called Panasonic..they told me to run a computer through the TV on black for 3 hours. I did that... Still there.

I then read this post... I tried to run the slides for 3 days...slight if any improvement. Then I deleted all the slides except black. Been running that for about 24 hours and it seems much better. Will give it a day or two and report back.

I have had a Plasma upstairs as my bedroom set for about 4 years with no problems. It was the cheap Panny... This one cost a fortune and with minimal use got image retension / burn-in very very easily.

Still makes me mad. I think the difference between burn-in vs. image retension is that image retension you can over come but burn-in is permanant..not sure..but either way.
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