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Do LCD/LEDs have a break in period? Do they degrade with time? - Page 2

post #31 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by rogo View Post

I recommended that thread be closed and ignored for a long time. Then I gave up.

If people want to risk destroying their TVs, I can't stop them.

If they want to carefully loosen a few screws (not too far!) to try to mitigate a problem... I can -- in that case -- help them understand why that might help a bit, while encouraging caution.

As long as new members can be warned of the potential harm such things can do, I think posts like yours are worthwhile. Those new to the forum might take all the advice they get at face value and possibly damage their set in a worst case scenario (and likely just waste time on a approach that doesn't do what it claims to in a best case scenario).
post #32 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by 8mile13 View Post

There is a < LED longterm performance? > sticky in the Calibration Forum, have fun smile.gif
http://www.avsforum.com/t/1278372/led-longterm-performance

Yes, thanks for pointing that out again. I read through it some months back and it hasn't moved much since. But it does point out some interesting findings.

Well, I'll be content with my CCFL/EEFL LCD panels for awhile now. One is a 6 year old 46" Mitsubishi Diamond series LT-46231 S-PVA panel and my 2010 LG 42LD550 S-IPS panel. Both take at least 60 to 90 minutes to reach maximum light output.

I was concerned about CCFLs, but it now seems LEDs are not immune from aging issues and maybe even more accelerated than CCFL from what Chad B found. And the degradation of yellow in LEDs would certainly be an issue. That would throw white balance way off and difficult if not impossible to correct since it is the light source. Well, nothing is forever.

At the same time, I still love my Mitsu. Amazing black level for an LCD and excellent color. . . other than a poor "pseudo" CMS. But still excellent viewing!
post #33 of 40
Great post OP!

Here's what I know:

LCD and LED panels generally do not have a break in period like Plasmas do. You can keep them nice and bright from day 1.

However, constantly running them on a high back light setting will of course cause the overall illumination of the screen to degrade a little faster than it should. Ideally, keep the back light between 2 and 4, out of 10 levels. Adjust your contrast and brightness accordingly, along with room lighting.

Now, here's what I didn't know almost for a year when I purchased my LCD screen back in 2008:

Letting it run for at least 45 mins or more warms up the colors real nicely, and you actually experience better picture quality and motion resolution. So... cheers! Wish I had joined this forum back then!
post #34 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by techfreak191 View Post

Great post OP!

Here's what I know:

LCD and LED panels generally do not have a break in period like Plasmas do. You can keep them nice and bright from day 1.

However, constantly running them on a high back light setting will of course cause the overall illumination of the screen to degrade a little faster than it should. Ideally, keep the back light between 2 and 4, out of 10 levels. Adjust your contrast and brightness accordingly, along with room lighting.

Now, here's what I didn't know almost for a year when I purchased my LCD screen back in 2008:

Letting it run for at least 45 mins or more warms up the colors real nicely, and you actually experience better picture quality and motion resolution. So... cheers! Wish I had joined this forum back then!

it's worth mentioning, some LED-LCDs with a limited number of LEDs in the backlight need a higher backlight setting than 25% to 33% of the max since they don't produce that much light output at even the midpoint setting (50% of the max). The Samsung EH series comes to mind.
post #35 of 40
^^ Good to know.

On a related note, CCFL back lit LCDs seem to produce good contrast ratios.
post #36 of 40
White LEDs are blue or blue/violet LEDs with yellow phosphor painted on. The yellow phosphor degrades with time, leaving the spectrum deficient in green, yellow, and red.

http://www.avsforum.com/t/765874/lcd-tv-life-expectancy
post #37 of 40
Interesting...

What about CCFL back lit LCDs?
post #38 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by johnfull View Post

White LEDs are blue or blue/violet LEDs with yellow phosphor painted on. The yellow phosphor degrades with time, leaving the spectrum deficient in green, yellow, and red.

http://www.avsforum.com/t/765874/lcd-tv-life-expectancy

This has already been stated in this thread. Also, it really isn't "painted on" unless some really cheap LED maker has started to do that.eek.gif

The "white" LEDs are produced by "doping" the LED substrate with a combination of materials to blend colors and attempt to produce a white light. Some LED makers are better at this than others. But, yes, the yellow producing elements do degrade in time and shift color temperature.
post #39 of 40
Quote:
Originally Posted by techfreak191 View Post

Interesting...

What about CCFL back lit LCDs?

CCFL and/or EEFL back lights decrease in light output over time, but a lot depends on how high they are run during regular use. That is why it is good to turn the back light down as low as possible for your room lighting conditions. .. . then make your TV settings such as Contrast, Brightness, etc.

As far as other aging issues with CCFL. . . I have not noticed any major concerns even on my 6 year old Mitusbishi LT-46231. I keep the back light down in the 8 to 10 range (63 is max) and have touched up calibration about once a year. I do not use all the inputs so keep one as a benchmark to compare the others to and find no appreciable color shift, or at least not visible by eye.
Edited by Phase700B - 2/11/13 at 1:32pm
post #40 of 40
Have you ever encountered any ghosting and/or color bleeding issues on your CCFL screen? Particularly in darker, low contrast scenes?

Can upgrading to a 120 Hz or higher screen realistically cut down on blur and improve motion resolution?
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