or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › 3D Central › 3D Content › Kids watching 3D-- active vs passive
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Kids watching 3D-- active vs passive

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
I have a 4 year old grandson who loves watching his favorite kids movies here in the home theater. He is old enough now to sit through an entire movie, 90 minutes. So far his only experience with 3D has been at Disney attractions and that was never active glasses. So, I'm curious as to those of you with kids who watch 3D, do you have active or passive glasses? How old are they? Do they request 3D or do you force the version on them?

BTW- last I was with him at Disney where he wore their 3D glasses, similar to passive polar, he just considered it part of the ride and thought it was cool wearing the glasses.
post #2 of 19
when I bought our 3d Samsung tv two years ago all of my 3 daughters loved the 3D novelty. But at this point it's worn off on them, where they prefer 2d, except occasionally my 8 y/o wants to watch in 3d. Our tv uses active shutter. They'd much rather play/watch 3d games on the xbox 360
post #3 of 19
I don't have kids, but it seems like passive would be the best choice for cheaper, lighter glasses. Depending on the child, it may not really matter though.
post #4 of 19
I don't have kids, but my friend has little terrorists, so passive all the way. Most passive glasses are interchangeable with the ones you wear in a theater (RealD if I remember right) and can be very easily replaced. Now it's not like I hate kids, but when they break my stuff, I tend to dislike them very much.
post #5 of 19
In general, I would say passive. But bear in mind that they advise against young children of that age from viewing 3D content for any extended length of time. Their eyes aren't technically done cooking yet. I'm not sure what kind of documented data they have for this, but it makes sense. I have a six-year-old goddaughter, and I'd be wary of letting her to watch a full-length film in 3D. That's assuming she can keep the glasses on for that long.
post #6 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jedi2016 View Post

In general, I would say passive. But bear in mind that they advise against young children of that age from viewing 3D content for any extended length of time. Their eyes aren't technically done cooking yet. I'm not sure what kind of documented data they have for this, but it makes sense. I have a six-year-old goddaughter, and I'd be wary of letting her to watch a full-length film in 3D. That's assuming she can keep the glasses on for that long.


Actually, no they don't. See the American Optometric Association's FAQ:

Quote:
3: At what age can my child view 3D safely?

Vision, including binocular vision, develops from birth. No detrimental effects of viewing 3D have been reported at any age. Parents should note that from 6-12 months of age, basic binocularity is established. By the age of 3 years most children will have binocular vision well enough established to enjoy viewing 3D television, movies or games.

4: How long should children watch 3D television, movies or games?

As with most actives moderation is important. In this case, moderation may be helpful in avoiding behaviors that may lead to unhealthy sedentary lifestyles.

From a developmental vision perspective, establishing time limits makes sense, but need not be different from the same limits placed on the viewing of 2D content. Parents should keep in mind that hand held devices, due to the close proximity of the viewing, place higher demands on the vision system and that more frequent breaks are recommended when using these devices.

http://www.3deyehealth.org/faq.html
post #7 of 19
Those big honking warnings on the front of every 3D video game say otherwise (they had to come from somewhere). Just something to consider, which side you want to listen to.
post #8 of 19
Have enjoyed 3D movies with my kids for the last 2 years... active shutter glasses. Currently they are 9 and 14 years old. The younger one will request to see one of the 3D movies we have more frequently than the older one, but they both enjoy the 3D equilly. The older one will comment that a particular 2D presentation of a movie would be better if it was in 3D (and they are not the animated type movies from Disney, rather the typical action type movies). Both have better vision than their parents too!

Incidentally, neither of them complain about the glasses. My only complaint concerns the occasional "pause" to go get something more to drink & eat or taking a potty break... something the theater experience will not allow!
Edited by AVTrauma - 2/7/13 at 8:21pm
post #9 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jedi2016 View Post

Those big honking warnings on the front of every 3D video game say otherwise (they had to come from somewhere). Just something to consider, which side you want to listen to.

There is no evidence behind those warnings. Just companies afraid of lawsuits over new technologies. Go with the medical professional opinion.

The idea that stereoscopic 3D can stunt the continuing development of binocular vision is baseless. There is no mechanism for 3D content damaging one's vision any more than 2D content. If one can see 3D comfortably and correctly, there is no reason that he shouldn't enjoy it, no matter what age. (If 3D causes significant discomfort, then the individual may need a comprehensive eye exam.)
Edited by BleedOrange11 - 2/7/13 at 8:44pm
post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by BleedOrange11 View Post

I don't have kids, but it seems like passive would be the best choice for cheaper, lighter glasses. Depending on the child, it may not really matter though.

Also they have them in small sizes for kids.
post #11 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jedi2016 View Post

Those big honking warnings on the front of every 3D video game say otherwise (they had to come from somewhere). Just something to consider, which side you want to listen to.

They came from lawyers with an imagination for the gloom and doom.


Seriously, I was hoping this would not go down the path of the Warning, masturbation will make you go blind story. Having observed my grandson's viewing habits at this young age, I think the attention span limits will kick in long before any eye fatigue.

I agree that passive is probably easier for younger kids just because the glasses are simpler and not as bulky.


I do have a pair of kids size active glasses but we haven't yet tried them. I plan to try him out next time with spy kids game over to see how he handles the experience. Many of the other 3D stories he could be interested in are too dark, like Spider-Man, green hornet and other Marvel series. Many of them are more for 7-10 year olds anyway. Remember, we're talking about a 4 year old here. He also likes the 2D of Rio and I have that here in 3D too. It's a bright 3D but not as much pop effect as spy kids.
Edited by Don Landis - 2/9/13 at 1:03am
post #12 of 19
I'm not trying to tell you what to do, Don, I'm just throwing it out there, make of it what you will.
post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 
Jedi- I think nearly everyone of us are familiar with the 3D warnings and what they say and why they are put there (CYA). But the purpose of this thread is to ask what people are doing who have young children, what their experiences are and whether that experience is with active or passive systems.

Your comment: "
I have a six-year-old goddaughter, and I'd be wary of letting her to watch a full-length film in 3D. That's assuming she can keep the glasses on for that long." hit home with me and my experience with young kids attention span in general.


FWIW- I did ask my ophthalmologist and his opinion was that the shutter glasses may trigger some sort of hidden epilepsy but could not understand how it may arrest the development of the eyes. BTW- I had to explain how s3D works and the difference between active and passive. He had no concern whatsoever with passive. His guess was that the higher frequency shutter speed would be better in respect to epilepsy but all this he admitted was just guess work.
post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Landis View Post

Jedi- I think nearly everyone of us are familiar with the 3D warnings and what they say and why they are put there (CYA). But the purpose of this thread is to ask what people are doing who have young children, what their experiences are and whether that experience is with active or passive systems.

Your comment: "
I have a six-year-old goddaughter, and I'd be wary of letting her to watch a full-length film in 3D. That's assuming she can keep the glasses on for that long." hit home with me and my experience with young kids attention span in general.


FWIW- I did ask my ophthalmologist and his opinion was that the shutter glasses may trigger some sort of hidden epilepsy but could not understand how it may arrest the development of the eyes. BTW- I had to explain how s3D works and the difference between active and passive. He had no concern whatsoever with passive. His guess was that the higher frequency shutter speed would be better in respect to epilepsy but all this he admitted was just guess work.

Are you referring to passive shutter speed? If so not sure what shutter speed that would be as there is no shutter speed other than the refresh rate of the display and that is the same as if you weren't wearing glasses...
post #15 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Devedander View Post

Are you referring to passive shutter speed? If so not sure what shutter speed that would be as there is no shutter speed other than the refresh rate of the display and that is the same as if you weren't wearing glasses...

Maybe I used the wrong word to describe what the doctor was saying. He used the term we all use "shutter" speed. It means the rate that the LCD glasses goes opaque and clear alternating between left and right. Passive glasses don't work this way, only active glasses. I understood his logic since in medicine, neurological testing for epilepsy uses a strobe light to trigger seizures in epileptic cases. Comparing to the strobe testing, the "shutter" speed of the LCD glasses is really much higher than the strobe rate used in these epilepsy tests. Therefore I felt this was a non issue for 3D active viewing. Even if it was, the problem would not be isolated to children and could affect adults as well but there isn't any evidence it exists.
post #16 of 19
Active shutter glasses trigger headaches for me, so needless to say, I purchased a passive 3DTV. As a family, the last movie we watched was Hugo 3D on the 65" LG using a Sony BD player. My wife and 9 yo girl couldn't handle wearing the passive glasses throughout the movie. They had to remove the glasses about 10 times to rest for a few minutes. On the other hand, my 12yo girl and I were able to wear them for the entire length of the movie. I do get a headache if the 3D is not done correctly, especially with edge violations.
post #17 of 19
My 4 y/o loves watching 3d. I work a lot of hours and we try to stop and watch at least part of a movie together once a week or so Every time we start to pick out a movie she asks "can we watch one with the glasses?" Her favorite movie so far is Madagascar 3 and it is enjoyable for us adults too (well, it was the first 17 times we turned it on). I have an Epson 6010 projector shooting onto a homemade 120ish inch screen. The 3d of it is fantastic. Even when she had just turned 3 she asked to watch it. We absolutely love lots of pop out effects and it's fun to watch her dodge objects or try to catch stuff. Journey 2: The Mysterious Island is another with great 3d effects that she asks to watch repeatedly.

The glasses are too big for her head and she used to mess with them a lot. I picked up 2 pair of the Play Station 3 glasses on sale for $30. They have loops in the back of the arms. We put one of her stretchy hair bands through the loops. It holds them on very well. She wears them just fine and has yet to mess them up.
post #18 of 19
Thread Starter 
willclark77

Nice post and encouraging. My one grandson is 4 and a half now. He will he spending the weekend soon and I have Madagascar, Monsters Inc, Toy Story Pirates Band of Misfits, as well as a few others in 3D to watch. Of course we'll try Spy Kids too.


Darkside- I never heard of anyone getting headaches with passive before. Well, yes, one person, a woman too but then she complains that everything gives her a headache. She is generally just a miserable person.
post #19 of 19
Thread Starter 
Introduced 3D to my 4 yr old grandson today.

After Spykids: Game Over he really got into the 3D. I decided to pull our center seating out so we had lots of floor room and his first experience with 3D here, he was running around trying to grab the objects floating in the room. I knew it was working for him. After SpyKids, we watched Monsters, Inc, Sharkboy & Lavagirl, and finally Frankenweenie. He was mesmerized by the 3D. We had a 30 minute break in between movies. This gave me time to clean the finger prints off his glasses between movies. He was wide awake even an hour past his normal bedtime. I suppose my daughter will scold me when she gets home.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: 3D Content
AVS › AVS Forum › 3D Central › 3D Content › Kids watching 3D-- active vs passive