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Top Gun 3D - Page 2

post #31 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gamereviewgod View Post

I think it dawned on me last night what it is: The Paramount logos are different. The new one is a bit longer at the beginning which of course throws the whole thing off.

Good, that would make it easier to convert (if it wasn't in 3D).

Perhaps I should try playing on an HTPC with Avisynth ColorYUV(autowhite=true) (if it wasn't 3D).

Damn, these studios sure know how to frustrate a guy.
post #32 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by nathanddrews View Post

Call me old fashioned, maybe even racist, but I just want to keep my whites white. wink.gif

I'm not a fan of timing changes, but tinting an entire film a different color is just sloppy - whether intentional or not.

Scott used heavy color filters in his early career.

Just look at Beverly hills cop 2.
post #33 of 59
Keep in Mind that this is a 3D disc, so it's supposed to be watched with dark glasses; so I made a script, keeping the new color timing but trying to remove the 3D compensation effect: I changed color saturation (-10%) and brightness (-10 points); I think it's a good result: Gone is the huge orange tint, and the brightness is back to normal;

http://screenshotcomparison.com/comparison/7415

this is compared to the Old blu-ray:

http://screenshotcomparison.com/comparison/7418

What do you think?
post #34 of 59
It looked worse than that at my local IMAX. Even wearing the glasses the picture was incredibly orange and blownout.
post #35 of 59
I just watched it at home last night and it was horrible.
post #36 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by bravia3D View Post

I just watched it at home last night and it was horrible.

Well its a popcorn movie, but what about the PQ?
post #37 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by MisterXDTV View Post

Keep in Mind that this is a 3D disc, so it's supposed to be watched with dark glasses; so I made a script, keeping the new color timing but trying to remove the 3D compensation effect: I changed color saturation (-10%) and brightness (-10 points); I think it's a good result: Gone is the huge orange tint, and the brightness is back to normal

Unfortunately at the expense of black crush.

I think it is contrast (white level) rather than brightness (black level) that has been boosted.
Edited by IanD - 2/13/13 at 1:38am
post #38 of 59
caps-a-holic has their captures up: http://caps-a-holic.com/hd_vergleiche/comparison.php?cID=1556

To my eyes the contrast is considerably lower on the new transfer (more a gamma change than a contrast change really). It's all murky orange midtones, the 3D transfer just looks flat.. As far as I'm concerned, black crush is only a problem if that's not how the movie was intended to appear. Overly bright video transfers are a blight upon home video.
Edited by 42041 - 2/12/13 at 10:49pm
post #39 of 59
Ok I have changed the brightness from -10 to -8 to avoid black crush:
http://screenshotcomparison.com/comparison/7589
post #40 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by MisterXDTV View Post

Ok I have changed the brightness from -10 to -8 to avoid black crush:
http://screenshotcomparison.com/comparison/7589

I still prefer the original 3D black levels as you can see more detail.

I think it needs an Avisynth Levels adjustment 128->128 and 255->235 or something, just to compress the brighter parts.
post #41 of 59
Titanic 3D seemed orange in places as well, but I got used to it and thought the 3D was remarkable. But it sounds like both the 3D and the color are bad here. Sounds like it's the process they used rather than artistic intent. All this scuttlebutt, however, makes one wonder if it in some way contributed to Scott's personal problems and recent demise.


Edit: I did read several reviews including this from: http://www.blu-ray.com/movies/Top-Gun-3D-Blu-ray/60004/#Review and they don't appear to reference the color issue, but rather find the bluray version better than the 2D and more film-like. So that's a head scratcher. Also, noted in one review was that the original movie was 4:3 and the widescreen version does take away some enjoyment. I remember seeing this back in the day and was both blown away by the realsm, but also the unreality of what these pilots really were about--having been an aircraft ground controller in Vietnam. There was no margin for error for these guys and everything was strictly by the book--even the dog fights. They fought with robotic precision, not seat-of-pants heroics, and a lot of their decisions were sanctioned by strict orders and us ground control guys--ahh, I digress...
Edited by threed123 - 2/14/13 at 10:50am
post #42 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by threed123 View Post

Edit: I did read several reviews including this from: http://www.blu-ray.com/movies/Top-Gun-3D-Blu-ray/60004/#Review and they don't appear to reference the color issue, but rather find the bluray version better than the 2D and more film-like. So that's a head scratcher. Also, noted in one review was that the original movie was 4:3 and the widescreen version does take away some enjoyment.

Top Gun has always been 2.35:1 as far as I'm aware. At the most, it was done in Super 35 so the top/bottom could be expanded, but I've never seen such a print. Maybe someone else can shed more light on that.

I've also read reviews that say the 2D and 3D versions share the same print, which is clearly not the case.
post #43 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by threed123 View Post

Also, noted in one review was that the original movie was 4:3 and the widescreen version does take away some enjoyment.
Which review? Whoever said that is woefully misinformed eek.gif
The 70mm prints were slightly less wide at 2.20:1 but 4:3 is very much NOT how Top Gun was ever shown in theaters.
Edited by 42041 - 2/14/13 at 11:40am
post #44 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gamereviewgod View Post

Top Gun has always been 2.35:1 as far as I'm aware. At the most, it was done in Super 35 so the top/bottom could be expanded, but I've never seen such a print. Maybe someone else can shed more light on that.

The movie was shot in Super 35 with a negative ratio of 1.37:1. It was composed for and matted to 2.40:1 theatrically. However, Tony Scott instructed that the mattes be lifted to 2.0:1 for the letterboxed Laserdisc transfer, which was released at a time when most viewers were still uncomfortable with the concept of letterboxing. That ratio stuck around through the initial DVD release.

By the time of the Blu-ray (the first one), Tony Scott changed his mind and instructed that the film be matted back to the original 2.40:1 again.
post #45 of 59
Yup, now I remember, I had lots of laserdiscs back them. I don't know if I have Top Gun, will check. I do have the original DVD and believe I also have the 4:3 VHS sitting around somewhere. I'm on a hunt...
post #46 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Z View Post

The movie was shot in Super 35 with a negative ratio of 1.37:1. It was composed for and matted to 2.40:1 theatrically. However, Tony Scott instructed that the mattes be lifted to 2.0:1 for the letterboxed Laserdisc transfer, which was released at a time when most viewers were still uncomfortable with the concept of letterboxing. That ratio stuck around through the initial DVD release.

By the time of the Blu-ray (the first one), Tony Scott changed his mind and instructed that the film be matted back to the original 2.40:1 again.

Yup, I remember all this and can confirm with my dvd and BD. I do believe the subject was brought up when this was hitting Blu for the first time.
post #47 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Z View Post

The movie was shot in Super 35 with a negative ratio of 1.37:1. It was composed for and matted to 2.40:1 theatrically. However, Tony Scott instructed that the mattes be lifted to 2.0:1 for the letterboxed Laserdisc transfer, which was released at a time when most viewers were still uncomfortable with the concept of letterboxing. That ratio stuck around through the initial DVD release.

By the time of the Blu-ray (the first one), Tony Scott changed his mind and instructed that the film be matted back to the original 2.40:1 again.

Good info. Thanks.
post #48 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Z View Post

The movie was shot in Super 35 with a negative ratio of 1.37:1. It was composed for and matted to 2.40:1 theatrically. However, Tony Scott instructed that the mattes be lifted to 2.0:1 for the letterboxed Laserdisc transfer, which was released at a time when most viewers were still uncomfortable with the concept of letterboxing. That ratio stuck around through the initial DVD release.

The laserdisc aspect ratio is my favourite as it seems more relaxed with less cutting off the top of peoples heads. I was very disappointed none of the Bluray releases restored that aspect as an option and even more annoyed that Bluray never incorporated flexible pan, zoom and matting on display.
post #49 of 59
This is my final script: now the sky is blue and not green!
http://screenshotcomparison.com/comparison/7957
post #50 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gamereviewgod View Post

Review is live with screen comparisons. There are more than timing changes too. The images has been brightened which has washed out some of the color. On the other hand, it DID take care of some black crush, so it's not a total loss...
Yes it is!
JJ
Butt still, that cap of the 3D just lOOks re-dick-u-less.
Is everyone at the studios now colorblind?!?!
post #51 of 59
Ralph Potts over in the Official Bluray Review thread liked it and didn't notice the color change. His perceptions of 3D movies have been spot on for me, so the confusion continues.
post #52 of 59
Well Many reviewers might be color blind, but you can't cheat with screenshots.


Actually I just received my copy today and after 45 min in the movie and despite most of the great reviews, I felt there was a problem with the color scheme.

Actors seemed orange and the sky was kind of blue-grrenish.

So I typed Top Gun 3D orange on google and found this thread.

I'm re-assured now, I'm not crazy.

I mean I grow Up With Top Gun, Owned 2 VHS (first one broke) the 2 DVDs versions, HD-DVD then Blu-Ray ones and now this one.

I'm a big fan of Tony Scott and his aesthitics, but this presentations feels like you're watching you're movie through an orange-yellow veil.

Even whites are not whites.


Paramount f***ed it up pretty bad as far as I'm concerned.


Although technically the 3D is pretty great, although scr**ed by the color scheme.
post #53 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by MisterXDTV View Post

This is my final script: now the sky is blue and not green!
http://screenshotcomparison.com/comparison/7957
Prefer the official version. Sorry. It's not a zombie film. wink.gif
post #54 of 59
Everyone take a look at the 50's movie Gran Canyon, in Sleeping Beauty's BD.
That Cinerama movie was transfered in BD without any post processing, and you can easily see how close to Top Gun the picture is... that yellow, the cyan, the "orange"... it's typical of some vintage movies shot on film, and i love it when it's digitally added, just like i loved it in Raiders of the Lost Ark.
Edited by VickPS - 2/20/13 at 10:43pm
post #55 of 59
Well usually when you have a movie with orange or blue tones, whites remain whites.

For Example I've seen the movie Lockout yesterday and while you have a colour palette that has blue tones, whites remained whites, not blue-ish

I changed my white balance towards colder ones on my TV and was able to have a more realistic aspect closer to the previous releases of the movie.

For example the Aircraft-Carrier scene at the beginning always had a yellow/slightly orange look, with this release it looked orange. eek.gif
post #56 of 59
It was alright. AQ was on par and expected loud noises...
post #57 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Z View Post

The movie was shot in Super 35 with a negative ratio of 1.37:1. It was composed for and matted to 2.40:1 theatrically. However, Tony Scott instructed that the mattes be lifted to 2.0:1 for the letterboxed Laserdisc transfer, which was released at a time when most viewers were still uncomfortable with the concept of letterboxing. That ratio stuck around through the initial DVD release.

By the time of the Blu-ray (the first one), Tony Scott changed his mind and instructed that the film be matted back to the original 2.40:1 again.

Oddly enough, the HD clips of Top Gun in "The Cutting Edge" are 2.0:1 without DNR or the black crush of the Blu-ray.
post #58 of 59
Is the 2D version on this copy the same new transfer as the 3D? If it is i'll buy the 3D version rather than the current 2D release. The 3D version looks better than old 2D one.
post #59 of 59
Just like with Jurassic Park, the 2D disc is the old one, not remastered.
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