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PlayStation 4 - Page 131

post #3901 of 15292
Quote:
Originally Posted by PENDRAG0ON View Post

I am still laughing at the irony that Nintendo is the only company that is properly supporting BC and still supports digital content from their previous generation. Full system transfers are in place for both the Wii and DSi to bring almost everything to the new consoles. This includes Rock Band DLC.

I'm still laughing that some people think this is a big deal. Once a new generation begins, the old generation dies because it's so out of date. Besides, my PS3 will be sitting on a shelf right below my PS4 anyway, so I really couldn't care less.
post #3902 of 15292
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThumperII View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by lordxar5 View Post

Same here, but when I go trade my 360 in I have no trade value for the digital copies I picked up so in the long run DD at this time is useless. Even if its only a few bucks trade, its still lost money. So DD have to be dirt cheap for me to pick up.

Fortunately I only have a minor DD commitment, except for all DLC which is completely lost. I was hopeful Microsoft's plans would solve that or force other companies to change their policies but that was lost for now.

Be prepared for disappointment. MS and Sony have no interest in you hanging on to games longer. They want you to buy the latest and greatest and will not lift a finger to support games longer. Precedents have been listed in this thread including MS shutting down their own music servers. I expect Sony to be no better and have their own history of anti consumer behavior.

No disappointment here. Its all about dollars and companies separating them from consumers. I already know how the game is played just want to see some changes.
post #3903 of 15292
Quote:
Originally Posted by TyrantII View Post

Same here. It's a gimmick IMO.

Hell, I sort of like putting a new disc in and the anticipation of it spinning up for the first time. It's like driving a stick shift or something, and fires those pleasure areas in my brain.

What I HATE is waiting for a game install or patch update, especially on a newly bought game. If Sony was smart, they'll let us preload games were haven't bought, and download patches the same. Keep it encrypted or locked until the game is purchased, but allow us to get that data on the HDD so it's smooth sailing once you buy the digital license or put the game in for the first time.

I thought PS4 could install games and patches in the background, allowing you to play a new game before the install is complete. Seems illogical, but I thought I read that somewhere.


edit:

Yup, I did. Still not sure it's going to work as I previously stated, but it will make downloaded games actually convenient instead of annoying.

http://www.officialplaystationmagazine.co.uk/2013/04/24/ps4s-background-downloading-installing-explained-why-next-gen-wont-waste-any-of-you-time/
post #3904 of 15292
Quote:
Originally Posted by aaronwt View Post

I won't be worried about playing a game I purchased in 2016, in 2026. For me, once I'm done with a system I'm done. Just like I would not want to go back and play any of the games I played 35 to 40 years ago. Or even ten years ago.

Sure the games were fun at the time. But anytime I did look at a game I used to play, it's not the same any more. And it's hard to believe I even enjoyed it so much. Especially since it now looks like a pile of crap compared to what was available from current games. I expect it will be the same felling even from the new generation coming out. Even when comparing game from the launch of a system to games that come out many years later. There is a huge disparity. I can't even go back to any games from seven or eight years ago.

Just curious, but do you also feel that old films and old books should be destroyed after they are released, or after you have seen them once/read them once? It's the same type of situation here. It's a matter of history being lost. If that is indeed how you feel, then you are entitled to your opinion. I just feel that's a bit shortsighted and selfish to not care about preserving our history.

To me, it's not about having to connect to a server, or having to download a game, etc. It's about what happens when we have moved on to the next generation and how will we preserve what has been done in the current generation. Digital distribution totally removes that ability.

I wonder at times if all the "complaints" that you see out there regarding games not being as "good" as they used to be are just due to how the modern gamer's attitude is towards things, or whether there's a legitimate argument about that. What made the older games interesting is not how good their graphics were, or the sound, or the story-telling. To me it was more how the developers made due with the limitations they had and were forced to be as creative as possible to overcome those system limitations. Take a look at Metal Gear as a great example. Kojima was basically forced to make the game a stealth type game since the MSX didn't have the processing power to have all the bullets and characters on screen at the same time. He was forced to come up with a way to create a good game without there being a massive amount of action.

In the early days of gaming, developers also were more than just a bunch of people who knew how to write code. They were actual gamers who knew what they wanted in a good game and had experience playing both bad games and good games. I highly doubt that many "game developers" these days have actually played a lot of what they either make, or has been made in the past. All games, whether they are good or bad, need to be preserved. We need to have the ability to go back and see them again no matter how many years old they are. Whether or not you play them anymore is irrelevant. We just need to have a way to preserve them, and moving to 100% digital distribution only gets rid of that ability and dooms those games to permanent destruction from history.
post #3905 of 15292
Quote:
Just curious, but do you also feel that old films and old books should be destroyed after they are released, or after you have seen them once/read them once? It's the same type of situation here. It's a matter of history being lost. If that is indeed how you feel, then you are entitled to your opinion. I just feel that's a bit shortsighted and selfish to not care about preserving our history.

To me, it's not about having to connect to a server, or having to download a game, etc. It's about what happens when we have moved on to the next generation and how will we preserve what has been done in the current generation. Digital distribution totally removes that ability.

I wonder at times if all the "complaints" that you see out there regarding games not being as "good" as they used to be are just due to how the modern gamer's attitude is towards things, or whether there's a legitimate argument about that. What made the older games interesting is not how good their graphics were, or the sound, or the story-telling. To me it was more how the developers made due with the limitations they had and were forced to be as creative as possible to overcome those system limitations. Take a look at Metal Gear as a great example. Kojima was basically forced to make the game a stealth type game since the MSX didn't have the processing power to have all the bullets and characters on screen at the same time. He was forced to come up with a way to create a good game without there being a massive amount of action.

In the early days of gaming, developers also were more than just a bunch of people who knew how to write code. They were actual gamers who knew what they wanted in a good game and had experience playing both bad games and good games. I highly doubt that many "game developers" these days have actually played a lot of what they either make, or has been made in the past. All games, whether they are good or bad, need to be preserved. We need to have the ability to go back and see them again no matter how many years old they are. Whether or not you play them anymore is irrelevant. We just need to have a way to preserve them, and moving to 100% digital distribution only gets rid of that ability and dooms those games to permanent destruction from history.

Books and movies are definitely not a good comparison, as technology doesn't change for them. I totally understand about wanting to be able to play those games if you want. If that's honestly the way you feel, keep your old systems. Ultimately there will be a time (and for some there already is) when many of the consoles will be emulated and you can play them on your PC.

I don't want to be double/triple dipping as you say - that's not fair. If enough people complain or, even better, stop buying, they will change.

But as far as actually WANTING to play those games. I'm with the above poster - I have no desire to replay the past. I have, on occasion, gone back and played some of the games I loved as a kid/teen. I have tried to play Zelda: Link to the Past, Castlevania IV, Chrono Trigger, etc (as you can see, SNES has been my favourite system), but I just can't play it for longer than like 15 minutes before I lose interest and want to go back to playing current gen stuff.

Finally, I don't know where you get the notion that current developers aren't gamers. Have you seen some of the videos of developers showing off their games? They are often as excited as we are!
post #3906 of 15292
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jdurg View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by aaronwt View Post

I won't be worried about playing a game I purchased in 2016, in 2026. For me, once I'm done with a system I'm done. Just like I would not want to go back and play any of the games I played 35 to 40 years ago. Or even ten years ago.

Sure the games were fun at the time. But anytime I did look at a game I used to play, it's not the same any more. And it's hard to believe I even enjoyed it so much. Especially since it now looks like a pile of crap compared to what was available from current games. I expect it will be the same felling even from the new generation coming out. Even when comparing game from the launch of a system to games that come out many years later. There is a huge disparity. I can't even go back to any games from seven or eight years ago.

Just curious, but do you also feel that old films and old books should be destroyed after they are released, or after you have seen them once/read them once? It's the same type of situation here. It's a matter of history being lost. If that is indeed how you feel, then you are entitled to your opinion. I just feel that's a bit shortsighted and selfish to not care about preserving our history.

To me, it's not about having to connect to a server, or having to download a game, etc. It's about what happens when we have moved on to the next generation and how will we preserve what has been done in the current generation. Digital distribution totally removes that ability.

I wonder at times if all the "complaints" that you see out there regarding games not being as "good" as they used to be are just due to how the modern gamer's attitude is towards things, or whether there's a legitimate argument about that. What made the older games interesting is not how good their graphics were, or the sound, or the story-telling. To me it was more how the developers made due with the limitations they had and were forced to be as creative as possible to overcome those system limitations. Take a look at Metal Gear as a great example. Kojima was basically forced to make the game a stealth type game since the MSX didn't have the processing power to have all the bullets and characters on screen at the same time. He was forced to come up with a way to create a good game without there being a massive amount of action.

In the early days of gaming, developers also were more than just a bunch of people who knew how to write code. They were actual gamers who knew what they wanted in a good game and had experience playing both bad games and good games. I highly doubt that many "game developers" these days have actually played a lot of what they either make, or has been made in the past. All games, whether they are good or bad, need to be preserved. We need to have the ability to go back and see them again no matter how many years old they are. Whether or not you play them anymore is irrelevant. We just need to have a way to preserve them, and moving to 100% digital distribution only gets rid of that ability and dooms those games to permanent destruction from history.

Personally I actually think games are getting a lot better. I have fond Atari 2600, NES, SNES, N64, PS1, PS2, 360, and PS3. What I don't have is a way to play any of those but the current gen. I can't very well plug a N64 cartridge into a PS3. Museums are for keeping old items for exhibition. My closet is just a junk heap of old crap, well was anyway. I just traded nearly all my old stuff off. The few things they wouldn't take were the consoles that didn't power up anymore. They worked the last time I used them years ago but not any more.

How you and I can play these games is by emulator which uses a form digital distribution. Legalities and moralities aside, that preserves the games. So if companies can get this done and done right it benefits everyone. Digital distribution doesn't warp in sunlight, or demagnetize like old floppies, and it can be emulated or streamed via a Gaikai like service and brought forward. Hanging on to the old school is fine if your still able to use it. Given enough time, technology will pull too far away though. Try and play an Atari 2600 game today without emulating it. You have to find a working console, have the correct inputs on the TV, and have functioning games and controllers. Now pull the kids in and see how long they tolerate 0.5 bit goodness.

I'm not blasting your argument, I'm just posing the other side of the coin. Keeping history alive is a great idea but there are limitations to things. I think too many people hold on too hard to the past to really grasp the possibilities out there but it does take both sides of the argument to get things changed.
post #3907 of 15292
Quote:
Originally Posted by blastermaster View Post

Books and movies are definitely not a good comparison, as technology doesn't change for them. I totally understand about wanting to be able to play those games if you want. If that's honestly the way you feel, keep your old systems. Ultimately there will be a time (and for some there already is) when many of the consoles will be emulated and you can play them on your PC.

I don't want to be double/triple dipping as you say - that's not fair. If enough people complain or, even better, stop buying, they will change.

But as far as actually WANTING to play those games. I'm with the above poster - I have no desire to replay the past. I have, on occasion, gone back and played some of the games I loved as a kid/teen. I have tried to play Zelda: Link to the Past, Castlevania IV, Chrono Trigger, etc (as you can see, SNES has been my favourite system), but I just can't play it for longer than like 15 minutes before I lose interest and want to go back to playing current gen stuff.

Finally, I don't know where you get the notion that current developers aren't gamers. Have you seen some of the videos of developers showing off their games? They are often as excited as we are!

Go watch a movie from the 70s, and then come back here and tell us technology doesn't change them. tongue.gif
post #3908 of 15292
Quote:
Go watch a movie from the 70s, and then come back here and tell us technology doesn't change them.

The type of film used, format, film grain, music, cheesy effects, etc. doesn't take away from the fact that you can still be completely immersed in the story when it's done right (Blade Runner). When I play a game that goes blip, blip, bleep, has characters made up of pixels that I can count on my hand and compare it to the immersion of today's games then, yes, the comparison between old movies/books vs games is ridiculous.

Don't get me wrong. I have such good memories of going to the arcades and playing the likes of Jungle Hunt, Rygar, Wonder Boy, Final Fight, Double Dragon, WWF Wrestlemania, etc., but they just can't compare and, no, I don't want to play them anymore. At all.

Bring on the PS4!!!
post #3909 of 15292
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JbXVNKtmWnc

Yeah, bleeps and bloops of the older games don't really age well. wink.gif
post #3910 of 15292
Quote:
Originally Posted by PENDRAG0ON View Post

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JbXVNKtmWnc

Yeah, bleeps and bloops of the older games don't really age well. wink.gif
I think that song's appropriately named, it'd make me a little crazy to listen to that now.
post #3911 of 15292
Quote:
Originally Posted by aaronwt View Post

I won't be worried about playing a game I purchased in 2016, in 2026. For me, once I'm done with a system I'm done. Just like I would not want to go back and play any of the games I played 35 to 40 years ago. Or even ten years ago.

Sure the games were fun at the time. But anytime I did look at a game I used to play, it's not the same any more. And it's hard to believe I even enjoyed it so much. Especially since it now looks like a pile of crap compared to what was available from current games. I expect it will be the same felling even from the new generation coming out. Even when comparing game from the launch of a system to games that come out many years later. There is a huge disparity. I can't even go back to any games from seven or eight years ago.

That's all fine and all. But we're talking about people that this does matter to. And it does to some of us.
Quote:
Originally Posted by PENDRAG0ON View Post

I am still laughing at the irony that Nintendo is the only company that is properly supporting BC and still supports digital content from their previous generation. Full system transfers are in place for both the Wii and DSi to bring almost everything to the new consoles. This includes Rock Band DLC.

Yet they tie the content to the hardware itself which is a very consumer unfriendly practice. If your system fails, your only avenue to maintain your content is to have Nintendo repair it. And if your system is stolen (Or lost in the case of a DSi or 3DS), you're up the creek without a paddle.
Quote:
Originally Posted by blklightning View Post

I'm still laughing that some people think this is a big deal. Once a new generation begins, the old generation dies because it's so out of date. Besides, my PS3 will be sitting on a shelf right below my PS4 anyway, so I really couldn't care less.

Backwards compatibility or the pitfalls of digital?

I think the lack of backwards compatibility is disappointing. I have no attachment to the hardware of the PS3 or Xbox 360 and would appreciate their replacements having compatibility with their libraries and accessories that I intend to use for a long time. Heck, it's one of the main reasons I want a Wii U since it does a fine job of upscaling Wii games and I can finally enjoy 16:9 Wii games with a nice picture on my HDTV after years of keeping it hooked up a CRT. But it's not a dealbreaker either.

But the pitfalls of digital stink.
Quote:
Originally Posted by blastermaster View Post

Books and movies are definitely not a good comparison, as technology doesn't change for them. I totally understand about wanting to be able to play those games if you want. If that's honestly the way you feel, keep your old systems.

Lots of people love classic gaming so I think it's a fine comparison.

And keeping our old systems isn't a solution to the issues with digital. Assuming they're even playable offline, it's just a minor bit of extra longevity since modern gaming hardware lacks any sort of durability and once the system you're using dies after the servers are shut down, your digital content is lost.
Quote:
Originally Posted by lordxar5 View Post


How you and I can play these games is by emulator which uses a form digital distribution. Legalities and moralities aside, that preserves the games.

Very few game consoles have been emulated to anythingapproaching 100%. And even then, you can't use your original controllers and accessories unless you purchase adapters that may or may not exist.
Quote:
Originally Posted by lordxar5 View Post

Try and play an Atari 2600 game today without emulating it. You have to find a working console, have the correct inputs on the TV, and have functioning games and controllers. Now pull the kids in and see how long they tolerate 0.5 bit goodness.

The Atari 2600 is a 8 bit machine. And 2600's were built like a rock. If you locate a console, chances are that it works. And I'm not aware of any television's that lack a coaxial jack. So it's simply a matter of purchasing a $2 part called a F type adapter that allows you to plug it in directly to your set's coaxial jack (Unlike the old days where you used a tv/game switchbox connected to your television's VHF screws).
Quote:
Originally Posted by blastermaster View Post

The type of film used, format, film grain, music, cheesy effects, etc. doesn't take away from the fact that you can still be completely immersed in the story when it's done right (Blade Runner). When I play a game that goes blip, blip, bleep, has characters made up of pixels that I can count on my hand and compare it to the immersion of today's games then, yes, the comparison between old movies/books vs games is ridiculous.

Don't get me wrong. I have such good memories of going to the arcades and playing the likes of Jungle Hunt, Rygar, Wonder Boy, Final Fight, Double Dragon, WWF Wrestlemania, etc., but they just can't compare and, no, I don't want to play them anymore. At all.

And plenty of people think like you do with tv/movies. Many are unwilling to watch anything that's in B&W. Many others are instantly turned off if a movie or tv show isn't in widescreen. And many if it wasn't made in the past ten years just consider it automatically archaic and refuse to watch. But that doesn't make it universally so. Heck, I love film history but anything much earlier than 1935, particularly if it's silent, doesn't do much for me. But that doesn't mean that there aren't young people that are discovering that era and loving it. Silent movies have more fans today than they've had in years and interest in their discovery and preservation is at an all time high.

And many things like special effects had a primitiveness to them that shares a close correlation with videogames. Watch a 1940's movie and if you see an airplane that is a model, chances are that its movement is completely unnatural. Yet sometimes they did stunning things like with ship models exploding back then just like game developers sometimes accomplishing stunning effects with hardware that's absolutely primitive by today's standards.

There's plenty of immersion to be had in classic games. When a classic game is done right, it can be just as enjoyable today as it was in the past just like something like Cary Grant's classic film Arsenic & Old Lace from the WWII years is still being discovered and enjoyed by younger generations today.
Edited by Leo_Ames - 7/21/13 at 3:22pm
post #3912 of 15292
Quote:
Yeah, bleeps and bloops of the older games don't really age well.

Not sure if you're being serious, but no, it doesn't age well IMHO. But a Final Fantasy III (US) reboot on the PS4 would make me giddy.
post #3913 of 15292
Quote:
Originally Posted by blastermaster View Post

Not sure if you're being serious, but no, it doesn't age well IMHO.

tumblr_mg48n3EEoR1s2753vo2_500.jpg
post #3914 of 15292
How is something like the music in Link to the Past just beeps and bloops? Even the Atari 2600 could do a fine job of the audio side of things when pushed well. The startup tune for Ms. Pac-Man for instance. There's not a bad thing about it and we're talking about a game console that was released in 1977 that was designed a year or so earlier and was intended to be affordable. Yet 35 years later and it's hardly murder on the ears. It's simple but effective and attractive at the same time.

Ignore the ghost, they don't disappear like that in real life on something like a CRT. It's a consequence of them not being there every frame which was a programming trick to accomplish more than would otherwise be possible with the hardware (Flicker). And since this recording skips frames, they sometimes are synced with the recording just right where a ghost will disappear for a second or two at a time until reappearing in the frames it's recording.
post #3915 of 15292
this (digital download argument) reminds me of the kinect argument..

pro kinect = you must buy kinect and you have to agree to like otherwise you are anti- next gen and stuck in the past
anti kinect = if you would like to buy a kinect and use it, that is great and i would never think about stopping you, but it is not for me

pro DD= I don't care about playing games in the future or trade ins and if you don't agree with me then you are anti - next gen and stuck in the past
"anti" DD (no one is really anti DD, just want the option of disc)= if you don't like to play old games or trade games in or give games to charity for sick/underprivileged children then that is fine please DD every game, but i would like the option...

just not sure why people are so adamant about people having to purchase they way they see fit.. that is like me saying all music should only be underground Christian rap (yes that is all i listen to), because i don't see how people like to listen to other types of music! Just because you "don't understand" doesn't mean you other people shouldn't have the option. No one is saying Kinect should be banned from earth and no one is saying don't offer DD, all people are saying is don't force it on me.....
post #3916 of 15292
I don't even ask for a disc every time. I recognize that we're getting things through digital store fronts like XBLA and PSN that would've stood no chance if optical disc released via retail was the only option. So I'm willing to accept some limitations in order to enjoy such things although I'd certainly love to get everything I like on disc.

I just don't like the thought of stuff that could make a go of it on disc not appearing on disc. Nor do I like it when people act like everyone else only ever looks forward when they say it really doesn't matter that our digital purchases will one day a few years after servers shut down disappear when the hardware it's residing on fails and requires replacement.

It's fine that it doesn't matter to some. But they post that like they think it's some sort of a rebuttal to those that do express concern about it.
post #3917 of 15292
Quote:
Originally Posted by Leo_Ames View Post

How is something like the music in Link to the Past just beeps and bloops? Even the Atari 2600 could do a fine job of the audio side of things when pushed well. The startup tune for Ms. Pac-Man for instance. There's not a bad thing about it and we're talking about a game console that was released in 1977 that was designed a year or so earlier and was intended to be affordable. Yet 35 years later and it's hardly murder on the ears.............................

I definitely disagree with that. The Atari 2600 audio from that youtube video is murder on my ears. I do remember having PAc-man on the Atari back then. It was nothing like what was in the arcade though. But the audio on that is horrible. It makes me want to put ear plugs in.

I can't believe I enjoyed playing that back then. We had a bunch of games for the Atari in the 70's and early 80's. I enjoyed them at the time, but if they are anything like that youtube video, I would not want to see or hear them any more.

I wonder if my parents still have that old Atari system? I'll need to ask them the next time I see them. Is it worth anything? If so all I would want to do with it is sell it.
post #3918 of 15292
Having done a bit of work in arcade cabinets, I can tell you the speakers in most older cabinets where of the type which cut off alot of high frequencies. Which is why it makes it so much softer on the ears
post #3919 of 15292
Some Drive Club info.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=75-Iw3CQBC0

"We've emulated the effect of each individual thread in the weave of the carbon fibre, so the patternalters realistically with the lighting angle. The lights themselves are fully modeled using multiplelayers of reflectors and lenses that refract the real bulbs underneath. And we've modeled thoserainbow patterns you get when you wax the plastic headlamp covers.""Even the suede and carpet have a fibre direction map, causing them to reflect light differently whenthey've been brushed or touched."
post #3920 of 15292
Atari 2600's are worth a decent bit of money. Particularly if it's one of the earlier six switch models.

I don't see how the audio in that video is murder on the ears. It's simple and basic but it's still attractive and pleasant to my ears. And the startup tune in particular is a long ways away from just beeps. Here's a 2600 game from back in the day that I think is the best example on the system of the full package. It's simple and basic but thanks to colorful and sharp graphics, great control, timeless gameplay, and audio that fits the game perfectly, it remains a great game to this day when played with a proper controller (A Xbox 360 gamepad does not mix with this game if played via the 360's Game Room app). It's what I show people that think there's nothing worthwhile on the Atari 2600.

And going to more modern eras, there's certainly nothing wrong with something like Super Mario World or Link to the Past on the Super Nintendo. As far as I'm concerned, it's undebatable that those two games and many others have excellent audio, some of the best 2D graphics ever seen, and timeless and engaging gameplay.
post #3921 of 15292
Thread Starter 
I guess we'll soon be welcoming new friends from China now that their government has finally lifted the ban on foreign consoles.

While a new, official market as potentially large as China could be lucrative, Sony had better make sure that the PS4's anti-piracy strategy is airtight because it will be tested thoroughly in that country.
post #3922 of 15292
Reading up on the restrictions that China is placing on the games that will be approved, Nintendo is the one with the most to gain. Their family friendly games will rarely hit any snags with the approval system.

Sony will have more issues, a lot of their games have elements that would get them shot down quickly unless heavily edited...

Microsoft would have the same issues with many games needing to be edited, and I just can't see China allowing the Kinect at all in light of PRISM.
post #3923 of 15292
@ Leo,

Ok first, that shooting game IS murder to my ears. Good s@#t!

You are right, though, some of those SNES games had good audio and, in fact, Super Castlevania IV still lingers in my mind as one of the most memorable soundtracks, next to FF 3 (US). But, they're still 16 bit and would be much better served with CD quality audio. And, yes, they are definitely playable and engaging. And I find myself going back to them every once in a while for nostalgia. But I quickly lost interest. Would I play Secret of Mana over The Last of Us? Not a snowball's chance in hell. That's just me, though. Everyone is entitled to play whatever makes them happy, and I think it's cool that people can play through Chrono Trigger, for example. I just don't have time. The one game I would say I do go back to is Castlevania: Symphony of the Night. THAT game had the best 2D I've ever seen and had great, great audio.

As far as digital downloads, movie buffs have been paying the price with every new video format (VHS, DVD, Blu-Ray, Red-Ray?), so I don't see how it's going to be different with digital downloads. They will give us just enough of a bigger carrot for the same damned thing to keep us going for it (better resolution, shinier graphics, etc.). It will be just enough to justify a new purchase and they most definitely will not change policy as long as people are willing to ante up. Even then...
post #3924 of 15292
Quote:
Originally Posted by PENDRAG0ON View Post

Some Drive Club info.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=75-Iw3CQBC0

"We've emulated the effect of each individual thread in the weave of the carbon fibre, so the patternalters realistically with the lighting angle. The lights themselves are fully modeled using multiplelayers of reflectors and lenses that refract the real bulbs underneath. And we've modeled thoserainbow patterns you get when you wax the plastic headlamp covers.""Even the suede and carpet have a fibre direction map, causing them to reflect light differently whenthey've been brushed or touched."

While the technology is interesting, and will undoubtedly pay dividends for engines down the road. I do have to wonder if this is overkill for a arcade racer. Especially one that god a knock for it's performance and 30FPS target.

I'm sure they'll make me eat hay, but honestly allocating hardware to resource intensive fluff this early is nice, but not really needed. Focus on the gameplay, and getting it running at peak performance.
post #3925 of 15292
The Driveclub devs have stated that they will try to hit 60fps with the final game.

The E3 demo needed to be up and running in a limited amount of time, on recently finalized hardware, using an older build for stability. 30fps was a sacrifice they had to make to do it.
post #3926 of 15292
Quote:
Originally Posted by blastermaster View Post



You are right, though, some of those SNES games had good audio and, in fact, Super Castlevania IV still lingers in my mind as one of the most memorable soundtracks

I actually just played this game recently on a beautiful Sony PVM-20M2MDU rgb monitor and a great sound system.

One guy was saying that he just can never go back and play old games. Let me tell you, Castlevania IV for the SNES ain't no joke. The music is absolutely amazing. Seeing that game in pure RGB crt goodness is awesome.
post #3927 of 15292
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anthony1 View Post

I actually just played this game recently on a beautiful Sony PVM-20M2MDU rgb monitor and a great sound system.

One guy was saying that he just can never go back and play old games. Let me tell you, Castlevania IV for the SNES ain't no joke. The music is absolutely amazing. Seeing that game in pure RGB crt goodness is awesome.

Absolutely love the soundtrack, that and Herzog Zwei for genesis are fantastic!
post #3928 of 15292
Quote:
Originally Posted by Anthony1 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by blastermaster View Post



You are right, though, some of those SNES games had good audio and, in fact, Super Castlevania IV still lingers in my mind as one of the most memorable soundtracks

I actually just played this game recently on a beautiful Sony PVM-20M2MDU rgb monitor and a great sound system.

One guy was saying that he just can never go back and play old games. Let me tell you, Castlevania IV for the SNES ain't no joke. The music is absolutely amazing. Seeing that game in pure RGB crt goodness is awesome.

That was a great game! I've tried going back a few times and just can't. Too bad their latest incarnation sucked so badly. Getting titles like this on Gaikai would be cool if their able.
post #3929 of 15292
Quote:
Originally Posted by blastermaster View Post

@ Leo,

Ok first, that shooting game IS murder to my ears. Good s@#t!

It's music to my ears. To me, it's nothing like chalk being scratched across a chalk board, a dentist drill, or bad game audio in general.

I guess I have no right to doubt anyone. I'm not the forum police with the power to judge if someone's opinions have validity or not. But I can't help but think that some of you are confusing simpleness with poor quality. You don't need to be pushing a billion polygons and have several gigabytes of memory for textures, multiple channels with lossless surround sound audio being sent through them, and so on to create an attractive and enjoyable videogame.

Simple graphics and audio can still be well done and attractive even in today's era. Simple and quality aren't mutually exclusive. The growth of an entire genre of classic gaming compilations that was a staple during the previous two console generations, games that are perennially rereleased decades later with each subsequent generation, the growth of digital distribution for classics that has largely supplanted retail compilations in recent years, communities full of hundreds of enthusiast restoring classic arcade machines, people constantly on the search for classic games and hardware, people creating new items including impressive games for consoles like the Atari 2600 that put to shame earlier commercial efforts, and so on and so on are all a testament that there's still magic to be found with gaming's yesteryear.

Heck, I'd argue that the basic fact that gaming still exists is a testament that earlier generations of videogaming had a lot to offer. If something like the audio in one of the top games on the Atari 2600 was objectively awful, I contend that this hobby wouldn't of evolved and be what it is today but rather it would have died out after the early novelty wore off.
Edited by Leo_Ames - 7/21/13 at 9:12pm
post #3930 of 15292
Kevin Gifford has done a six episode podcast on game music over at magweasel.com. I'm treating it like a book and listening to learn. The guy is loaded with info and sounds like the Tourette's guy so it's a great listen.
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