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Adjusting Cell Light on a Plasma - Page 2

post #31 of 49
When backlight is turned all the way down and screen is dark the gains especially red I notice still has a Noticable effect on temperature. Showing how much gains effect the dark parts.Edit I tried adjusting red gain for brights with cel light 0 and ended up tv looked real dull.
Edited by Vic12345 - 4/22/13 at 2:20am
post #32 of 49
http://www.hdtvtest.co.uk/news/samsung-ps64f8500-201305012945.htm?page=Performance

...Samsung offers two controls to adjust peak white output: [Cell Light] and [Contrast]. The two produce a very similar result, although [Contrast] operates at the video processing level. Therefore, during calibration, [Contrast] should first be reduced (we only had to do it by a few clicks) so that near-white details are not crushed our or discoloured. From there, [Cell Light] can be adjusted to reduce screen light output, if necessary.

There has been some discussion as to which control is best used to reduce light output: for example, is it best to ignore [Cell Light], leaving it at full and reduce [Contrast] if a less bright picture is necessary? Or leave [Contrast] set and reduce [Cell Light]? The latter is the best way, as far as we can tell. Examine a gradient ramp and try reducing both controls and you’ll see that, as you’d expect, adjusting the [Contrast] control creates a small amount of banding due to the fact that this is a digital video processing adjustment (the same, or worse, would happen on any other brand’s HDTV, by the way) whereas the [Cell Light] control appears to be a more direct control over the panel driving, once the signal is out of the hands of the main video processing steps. Samsung’s video processing operates at a high bit depth (higher than the 8-bit sources available to consumers) so the banding is minimal, but it’s still best to avoid shifting levels around at all...
post #33 of 49
Surprised that it's not recommended to stabilize the continuous changing white luminance brightness levels.Has it been tested on the e series?

I mean the northamerican e series
Edited by Vic12345 - 8/19/13 at 4:19am
post #34 of 49
Too me it looks like cell light (around 13-17,contrast low90s)) reduce the torchy whites,and makes gamma more consistent by reducing high contrast shows,but it's too washed out and it is too dim on SOME shows(this is when gamma is at +1).Might get it too work in a real dark room.I think I'm on the cell 20 team as my room can be bright.(sam51pne450)
Edited by Vic12345 - 8/20/13 at 5:02pm
post #35 of 49
You still do not understand. Cell Light is a BOGUS CONTROL. It does NOTHING USEFUL. Samsung themselves admit this if you get the the right people to talk off the record. The only right setting for Cell Light is to set it to 20 and LEAVE IT ALONE (set to the highest setting, earlier models topped out at 10 I think).

Cell Light exists only to fill the slot taken by the Backlight control in LCD TVs. It is convenient for Samsung to use the same menu structure for plasma and LCD TVs so they "invented" the Cell Light control to add something other manufacturers don't have, even though it does nothing useful.

You set how bright white is with the Contrast control and you set the black level with the Brightness control and you leave Cell Light alone! Before there was a cell light control, plasma TVs (all of them) operated the same way they operate with Cell Light set to maximum.

You are doing all kinds of messing around that would be 100% fixed with proper calibration using a meter and calibration software. Anything else you do is just guessing.
post #36 of 49
I know this an older thread but wanted to check to make sure max cell setting is the best route for those newer Samsung plasma sets. I've taken Doug's advice and have calibrated my F8500 with a cell setting of 20.
post #37 of 49

I've just logged over 160 hours on my budget-model Samsung PN43F4500 and have started tinkering with the picture settings in Movie Mode. I'm also curious to know if the max Cell Light method is still valid for the 2013 models. I've been playing with keeping Cell Light at 17-18 and Contrast at 92-94. I've also been using Cell Light 20 and lowered Contrast to 85-86 which seems to produce very similar results though skin tones look a bit muddier. For day viewing I've been using the combination of Cell Light 20 and Contrast 92, but that is definitely too "hot" for my eyes in a pitch-black room. 

post #38 of 49
Probably been said but I find lowering it dims SOME screens and it does not look good.the most important thing on plasma is getting white balance the right color.
post #39 of 49
If the Cell Light control does the same thing on a plasma as the Backlight control on an LCD display, couldn't lowering cell light produce deeper blacks?
post #40 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big C View Post

If the Cell Light control does the same thing on a plasma as the Backlight control on an LCD display, couldn't lowering cell light produce deeper blacks?

it's not the same as backlight in that sense, it's more like contrast (or panel brightness on the panasonics) in that it only affects white level (max light output)
post #41 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by PlasmaPZ80U View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Big C View Post

If the Cell Light control does the same thing on a plasma as the Backlight control on an LCD display, couldn't lowering cell light produce deeper blacks?

it's not the same as backlight in that sense, it's more like contrast (or panel brightness on the panasonics) in that it only affects white level (max light output)
I consider contrast, brightness, color, tint, gamma, white balance, and color space video processor adjustments, as opposed to actual panel adjutments. I consider cell light and backlight actual panel adjutments. From the looks of your post, it looks like a low cell light setting would only introduce more ABL. Therefore, I'm leaving mine at max at all times.
post #42 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Big C View Post

I consider contrast, brightness, color, tint, gamma, white balance, and color space video processor adjustments, as opposed to actual panel adjutments. I consider cell light and backlight actual panel adjutments. From the looks of your post, it looks like a low cell light setting would only introduce more ABL. Therefore, I'm leaving mine at max at all times.

How would decreasing cell light increase abl ?
post #43 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkHorse88 View Post

I've just logged over 160 hours on my budget-model Samsung PN43F4500 and have started tinkering with the picture settings in Movie Mode. I'm also curious to know if the max Cell Light method is still valid for the 2013 models. I've been playing with keeping Cell Light at 17-18 and Contrast at 92-94. I've also been using Cell Light 20 and lowered Contrast to 85-86 which seems to produce very similar results though skin tones look a bit muddier. For day viewing I've been using the combination of Cell Light 20 and Contrast 92, but that is definitely too "hot" for my eyes in a pitch-black room. 
Cell Light on the 2013 Samsungs should be considered the Contrast control on other plasmas. You would use that instead of the actual Contrast control to adjust the panel's brightness (set the Actual Contrast control on 95 and leave it alone).
post #44 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by D-Nice View Post

Cell Light on the 2013 Samsungs should be considered the Contrast control on other plasmas. You would use that instead of the actual Contrast control to adjust the panel's brightness (set the Actual Contrast control on 95 and leave it alone).

Oh boy... I did the opposite. I did notice my 10-pt did not track properly with lower contrast (<85) and high Cell (20) ...but still achieved good results.
post #45 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by D-Nice View Post

Cell Light on the 2013 Samsungs should be considered the Contrast control on other plasmas. You would use that instead of the actual Contrast control to adjust the panel's brightness (set the Actual Contrast control on 95 and leave it alone).

are you saying both cell light and contrast affect clipping and discoloration of white and all colors at the top end? so a high contrast setting with a moderate cell light setting would the same as a moderate contrast setting with a high cell light setting?

and would setting contrast high (95 to a 100) and lowering cell light allow me to use the 10-pt controls without mistracking and without clipping/discoloration at the top end (by compensating with lower cell light than 20/20)?
post #46 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by PlasmaPZ80U View Post

are you saying both cell light and contrast affect clipping and discoloration of white and all colors at the top end? so a high contrast setting with a moderate cell light setting would the same as a moderate contrast setting with a high cell light setting?

and would setting contrast high (95 to a 100) and lowering cell light allow me to use the 10-pt controls without mistracking and without clipping/discoloration at the top end (by compensating with lower cell light than 20/20)?
What???

I simply said to leave the contrast setting at 95. Adjust the brightness of the display win the cell light control. Even with the Cell light at 20, as long as Contrast is set to 95, you should not be clipping.
post #47 of 49
D-Nice,

Thank you for the response. I'll set contrast back to 95 and adjust cell. With regards to Samsung plasma gamma: is the 0 setting supposed to be 2.2 in your experience or closer to 2.4? I gather it might be unique to each individual display.
post #48 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by D-Nice View Post

What???

I simply said to leave the contrast setting at 95. Adjust the brightness of the display win the cell light control. Even with the Cell light at 20, as long as Contrast is set to 95, you should not be clipping.

My PN51F5300 clips WTW (and colors past 235) at Contrast 91/100 and above, causing major discoloration on the Basic and Advanced Contrast Flashing Bar Patterns of Ted's disk. So, I can't simply use the default contrast setting of 95 in Movie mode.

If Cell Light merely adjusts light output and not clipping/discoloration, then simply using Contrast 95/100 and Cell Light lower than 20/20 won't help in my case.



(Hope that clarifies my previous post.)
post #49 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by DarkHorse88 View Post

D-Nice,

Thank you for the response. I'll set contrast back to 95 and adjust cell. With regards to Samsung plasma gamma: is the 0 setting supposed to be 2.2 in your experience or closer to 2.4? I gather it might be unique to each individual display.

gamma zero (default) is around 2.2 gamma on my set (51" F5300)
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