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AVS Roundup of the Best-Reviewed Flat Panel TVs of 2012 - Page 6

post #151 of 254
Quote:
Originally Posted by rogo View Post

Steve, great stuff as usual.

Vinnie, I'm not offended. But the funny thing is, the Retina Macbook Pro 13" model is actually a bargain. It's not overpriced at all. They are starting at $1300 at 3rd-party retailers at the moment, which is the same price as the much-less-capable Chromebook Pixel.
I spoke out of turn...I haven't done laptop shopping in almost 3 years. wink.gif
post #152 of 254
Quote:
Originally Posted by [Irishman] View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by tgm1024 View Post

First, You don't achieve "market primacy" purely for profit reasons

Well, sure you do! If TV manufacturers see two technology options - Option A and Option B, let's call them - they'll usually go for the one that makes them more money. That's Econ 101, my friend.

And here's where the conversation ends. With you taking my statement out of its context of why and how. Of COURSE they'll go for what makes them more money, that's been the entire thrust of what I've been saying. The difference is that you seem to think that the reason that LCD can make them more money is because of manufacturing and that's the reason that the manufacturers chose that route. Your "Econ 101" class apparently forgot to teach you that it is all driven FIRST by demand. If the demand were there for plasmas (it clearly isn't) then the market model would have supported a higher profit. You have it backwards and are continually spinning it around. Always *start* with what sells. With what the public wants. From there, you draw conclusions about why profit in one place is higher or lower.
post #153 of 254
Quote:
Originally Posted by tgm1024 View Post

And here's where the conversation ends. With you taking my statement out of its context of why and how. Of COURSE they'll go for what makes them more money, that's been the entire thrust of what I've been saying. The difference is that you seem to think that the reason that LCD can make them more money is because of manufacturing and that's the reason that the manufacturers chose that route. Your "Econ 101" class apparently forgot to teach you that it is all driven FIRST by demand. If the demand were there for plasmas (it clearly isn't) then the market model would have supported a higher profit. You have it backwards and are continually spinning it around. Always *start* with what sells. With what the public wants. From there, you draw conclusions about why profit in one place is higher or lower.

So, just what exactly does the public "want" in LCD-LED TVs? And more importantly, why do they think they "want" that?
post #154 of 254
Quote:
Originally Posted by tgm1024 View Post

And here's where the conversation ends. With you taking my statement out of its context of why and how. Of COURSE they'll go for what makes them more money, that's been the entire thrust of what I've been saying. The difference is that you seem to think that the reason that LCD can make them more money is because of manufacturing and that's the reason that the manufacturers chose that route. Your "Econ 101" class apparently forgot to teach you that it is all driven FIRST by demand. If the demand were there for plasmas (it clearly isn't) then the market model would have supported a higher profit. You have it backwards and are continually spinning it around. Always *start* with what sells. With what the public wants. From there, you draw conclusions about why profit in one place is higher or lower.
So what kind of demand did Samsung see that caused them to market LED TV's? No demand at all. Samsung created the demand through a clever and border line illegal ad campaign. What demand did Henry Ford perceive when he developed the automobile? There weren't even any roads yet. He followed a dream and the demand came after the product. Same can be said of OLED. One simple reason for this new technology, profit. Folks aren't buying enough of the current technology so lets get them a new one.
post #155 of 254
Quote:
Originally Posted by andy sullivan View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by tgm1024 View Post

And here's where the conversation ends. With you taking my statement out of its context of why and how. Of COURSE they'll go for what makes them more money, that's been the entire thrust of what I've been saying. The difference is that you seem to think that the reason that LCD can make them more money is because of manufacturing and that's the reason that the manufacturers chose that route. Your "Econ 101" class apparently forgot to teach you that it is all driven FIRST by demand. If the demand were there for plasmas (it clearly isn't) then the market model would have supported a higher profit. You have it backwards and are continually spinning it around. Always *start* with what sells. With what the public wants. From there, you draw conclusions about why profit in one place is higher or lower.
So what kind of demand did Samsung see that caused them to market LED TV's? No demand at all. Samsung created the demand through a clever and border line illegal ad campaign. What demand did Henry Ford perceive when he developed the automobile? There weren't even any roads yet. He followed a dream and the demand came after the product. Same can be said of OLED. One simple reason for this new technology, profit. Folks aren't buying enough of the current technology so lets get them a new one.

(?) In all of those cases demands had to be met. It's there even in the case of new industries, such as with the automobile, there was *already* demand for transit. And by the way, get a new history book. Of COURSE there were roads.

Guys, this is getting very weird.
post #156 of 254
Sorry. I assumed you would know that by no roads I wasn't being literal. Very few and mainly constructed for travel common at the time. I guess it a case of what came first, the chicken or the egg.
post #157 of 254
Quote:
Originally Posted by tgm1024 View Post


Guys, this is getting very weird.

Well, the logic might make more sense if you remember this is a very pro-plasma forum. Make no mistake, the plagenda precedent was established a few years before your join date.


And I helped start it smile.gif
Edited by borf - 3/29/13 at 7:47pm
post #158 of 254
plagenda, lol, how shadowy (and deeply black)
post #159 of 254
Quote:
Originally Posted by andy sullivan View Post

Sorry. I assumed you would know that by no roads I wasn't being literal. Very few and mainly constructed for travel common at the time. I guess it a case of what came first, the chicken or the egg.

Transportation and ground-shipping was around, and a very well understood need for thousands of years. There IS no chicken/egg construct.

This is hijacking an otherwise very important thread. If I can't reach you with economic demand imperatives, then perhaps think to the businesses proffering brand new ideas that didn't make it. You'd hear analysis afterward sounding much like "They discovered there wasn't much of a demand for _____".

But other than that, it's way too off topic.
post #160 of 254
Just to clarify--in my previous post I was by no means inferring that Panasonic (or any other plasma) is immune to IR or even Burn In, just that a lot of buyers of bargain plasmas of old had outright premature failure problems that don't occur on current major brand sets. I'm sure others here remember a certain computer mfg. marketing plasmas for the holiday season 7 or so years ago at half what a Panny, Samsung, Pioneer, etc. cost and a lot of folks got burned and told 20 of their friends to never buy a plasma. I ask questions of my customers to see if they are going to use the set in a way that would exacerbate the IR problem and if so steer them elsewhere. I myself have owned burn-in prone tvs (crt rear projection) and never had a problem, but took precautions. If a customer tells me they game 10 hours straight or only watch ESPN I discourage them from buying plasma.

Oddly I do get the occasional customer who specifically wants a plasma-- almost always someone who already has one purchased within the last couple of years and really loves it.

My current set is an LG edge lit passive 3D. I bought it fully intending to return it if it had noticeable flashlighting or clouding and lucked out. It doesn't have the black levels of premium full array local dimming sets, the Panny ST i was considering, or even a Sony HX850, but I don't watch in a totally dark room and I'm one of the few who sees annoying flickering with active 3D--it suits my needs but I wouldn't recommend it to someone with different priorities or a significantly higher budget.

BTW, Henry Ford didn't invent the automobile. What he did do is be the first to make a car that the average American could afford. He got rich producing lots of cheap cars with a level of quality acceptable to the masses, not a few excellent cars for the more affluent. I think this philosophy still appiies with most consumer goods, including tv sets.
post #161 of 254
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve S View Post

Just to clarify--in my previous post I was by no means inferring that Panasonic (or any other plasma) is immune to IR or even Burn In, just that a lot of buyers of bargain plasmas of old had outright premature failure problems that don't occur on current major brand sets. I'm sure others here remember a certain computer mfg. marketing plasmas for the holiday season 7 or so years ago at half what a Panny, Samsung, Pioneer, etc. cost and a lot of folks got burned and told 20 of their friends to never buy a plasma. I ask questions of my customers to see if they are going to use the set in a way that would exacerbate the IR problem and if so steer them elsewhere. I myself have owned burn-in prone tvs (crt rear projection) and never had a problem, but took precautions. If a customer tells me they game 10 hours straight or only watch ESPN I discourage them from buying plasma.

Oddly I do get the occasional customer who specifically wants a plasma-- almost always someone who already has one purchased within the last couple of years and really loves it.

My current set is an LG edge lit passive 3D. I bought it fully intending to return it if it had noticeable flashlighting or clouding and lucked out. It doesn't have the black levels of premium full array local dimming sets, the Panny ST i was considering, or even a Sony HX850, but I don't watch in a totally dark room and I'm one of the few who sees annoying flickering with active 3D--it suits my needs but I wouldn't recommend it to someone with different priorities or a significantly higher budget.

BTW, Henry Ford didn't invent the automobile. What he did do is be the first to make a car that the average American could afford. He got rich producing lots of cheap cars with a level of quality acceptable to the masses, not a few excellent cars for the more affluent. I think this philosophy still appiies with most consumer goods, including tv sets.

Good. Now back on topic....
post #162 of 254
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve S View Post

Just to clarify--in my previous post I was by no means inferring that Panasonic (or any other plasma) is immune to IR or even Burn In, just that a lot of buyers of bargain plasmas of old had outright premature failure problems that don't occur on current major brand sets. I'm sure others here remember a certain computer mfg. marketing plasmas for the holiday season 7 or so years ago at half what a Panny, Samsung, Pioneer, etc. cost and a lot of folks got burned and told 20 of their friends to never buy a plasma. I ask questions of my customers to see if they are going to use the set in a way that would exacerbate the IR problem and if so steer them elsewhere. I myself have owned burn-in prone tvs (crt rear projection) and never had a problem, but took precautions. If a customer tells me they game 10 hours straight or only watch ESPN I discourage them from buying plasma.

Oddly I do get the occasional customer who specifically wants a plasma-- almost always someone who already has one purchased within the last couple of years and really loves it.

My current set is an LG edge lit passive 3D. I bought it fully intending to return it if it had noticeable flashlighting or clouding and lucked out. It doesn't have the black levels of premium full array local dimming sets, the Panny ST i was considering, or even a Sony HX850, but I don't watch in a totally dark room and I'm one of the few who sees annoying flickering with active 3D--it suits my needs but I wouldn't recommend it to someone with different priorities or a significantly higher budget.

BTW, Henry Ford didn't invent the automobile. What he did do is be the first to make a car that the average American could afford. He got rich producing lots of cheap cars with a level of quality acceptable to the masses, not a few excellent cars for the more affluent. I think this philosophy still appiies with most consumer goods, including tv sets.

I was under the impression that IR/Burn-in was not a problem on modern Plasma's, except for bad samples - expert posters convinced me smile.gif

eek.gif The whole IR/Burn-in 'thing' got my attention again when i was reading Ken Ross posts in the F8500 Plasma thread on the subject:
Quote:
The only negative, and of course this played on my one fear, was that we saw a bit of IR. Robert and I didn't pick it up until D-Nice pointed it out. It was very subtle and difficult to see, but once pointed out, you could see it if you were really close up. D-Nice said, most of the Panasonics he's seen show some kind of IR when you look closely. So I suspect that many that don't think they have it, have it. Robert and I both missed it on the Samsung. So I could see that happening. Of course you can make the argument that if you can't see it, then it's not an issue. But the fact remains, plasmas are prone to IR if you're not careful. No two ways about it. Now I should add, when we came back to the panel later in the day, we could no longer find the IR. So thankfully this was IR and not burn-in.

Not necessarily. If a display shows a small amount of IR currently, then the fact that its current state of IR is very minor, is no guarantee that subjecting the display to more 'abuse' in terms of longer periods of logos etc, might not result in worse IR.

BTW, D-Nice agrees with me and finds IR to be very prevalent in plasmas and Panasonic is no exception. I've gotten several PMs in the last several days from Panny VT50 owners that freely admit to IR issues.

I'm really glad you haven't experienced it and I hope that continues. But your experience is no guarantee it won't happen to others. As I've said and D-Nice repeated, you need to use sound judgement with what you watch, how long you watch 'offending' material and make sure to use things like the orbiter to lessen the odds of IR...IOW, use sound judgement.


btw this was not send from his SCH-I535 using Tapatalk 2 tongue.gif
post #163 of 254
BTW, Rogo disagrees that something that most of the people looking at the display didn't even see constitutes a problem. They had to have it pointed out to them, had to be up close to see it, it disappeared.....

And then Ken concludes that, "therefore, this is something that could get bad enough that it might really be a problem" more or less. (my paraphrasing).

This despite overwhelming evidence that most people don't have a problem at all.
post #164 of 254
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by [Irishman] View Post


So, just what exactly does the public "want" in LCD-LED TVs? And more importantly, why do they think they "want" that?

I think the public in general wants TVs that are as bright and thin as possible, and LED-LCD provides that more than plasma. The difference in brightness is particularly apparent on a showroom sales floor; LED-LCDs simply look brighter than plasmas in that environment. Plus, as others have noted here, many in the public at large are afraid of plasma burn-in, and once in a while, I still hear people ask about having to "recharge" or "refill" the plasma gas. Nonsense, of course, but that misconception is still floating around out there.

post #165 of 254
Quote:
Originally Posted by rogo View Post

BTW, Rogo disagrees that something that most of the people looking at the display didn't even see constitutes a problem. They had to have it pointed out to them, had to be up close to see it, it disappeared.....

And then Ken concludes that, "therefore, this is something that could get bad enough that it might really be a problem" more or less. (my paraphrasing).

This despite overwhelming evidence that most people don't have a problem at all.
lol, love the new 3rd person approach, Mr. Snark.
post #166 of 254
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Wilkinson View Post

I think the public in general wants TVs that are as bright and thin as possible, and LED-LCD provides that more than plasma. The difference in brightness is particularly apparent on a showroom sales floor; LED-LCDs simply look brighter than plasmas in that environment. Plus, as others have noted here, many in the public at large are afraid of plasma burn-in, and once in a while, I still hear people ask about having to "recharge" or "refill" the plasma gas. Nonsense, of course, but that misconception is still floating around out there.

I'm afraid you're right on, Scott. And, unfortunately, too few people who could have made a difference - by educating their customers - actually did so, so that now here we are in a TV market where people think having the brightest picture possible should be at the top of your TV shopping list of features. Oh, that, and a quarter inch thick panel thickness.

I personally don't think there is enough discussion in places that can make a difference about the fact that there are standards of picture quality/accuracy, and that awareness of calibration isn't at the levels it should be. Certainly, as a calibrator, you can agree with me there, Scott. ISF and THX do what they can, but they can't be everywhere.

I only hope the reality of OLED lives up to the promise, especially given the issues they've had with extending the lifespans of the blue OLED.
post #167 of 254
Quote:
Originally Posted by vinnie97 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by rogo View Post

BTW, Rogo disagrees that something that most of the people looking at the display didn't even see constitutes a problem. They had to have it pointed out to them, had to be up close to see it, it disappeared.....

And then Ken concludes that, "therefore, this is something that could get bad enough that it might really be a problem" more or less. (my paraphrasing).

This despite overwhelming evidence that most people don't have a problem at all.
lol, love the new 3rd person approach, Mr. Snark.

TGM1024 does too.
post #168 of 254
i don't want to bring up Ken again but he made a interesting Elite Pro LED - F8500 Plasma comparison worth while posting IMO.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Glashub 
Ken, I'm about to put you on the spot. You can ignore this if you choose and I'll understand but -- if you had to choose just one display in your house to keep -- which one would it be?
Quote:
Originally Posted by KenRoss 
Ouch! You had to put me on the spot, didn't you?

Man, that's a tough question. Let's try to break it down by category with some rough generalizations (and these are obviously just my opinions). Others might feel differently in the various categories:

Color- I think observed color is pretty much a draw, even though it's measurably better on the 8500. Here I'm using more of my experience with my Pro 151 Kuro, when I had it and the Elite at the same time, since I haven't seen the Elite & 8500 side by side. I suspect in rare situations, if you knew what to look for (hello low luminance cyan?), the color might appear more accurate on the 8500- Slight advantage to the 8500.

Black levels-To the naked eye this is also probably a draw in the vast majority of situations, though I haven't seen them both side by side in totally dark environment. The MLL is measurably better on the Elite, but still exceptionally good on the 8500. There might be some rare situations, in a totally dark room with very very dark material where the Elite may have a slight edge- Slight advantage to the Elite.

Sharpness- Also very close based on what I've seen. The 8500 is the first plasma I've seen that has that 'precise' look (for a lack of a better word) not unlike an LED. This one's a draw.

Brightness- For all practical purposes, in a well lit room, this is also really close, but measurably better on the Elite. However, ABL is non-existent on the Elite but not as aggressive as typical plasmas on the 8500. But you will still see occasional instances of the ABL kicking in, it just won't be as frequent or as severe as in other plasmas. Slight advantage Elite.

Motion- I know the knee jerk response here is that plasma is always better. Perhaps I'm not as sensitive to motion issues as some, but I always thought the motion handling on the Elite was excellent. Likewise, I found the motion handling on the 8500 just as good. This one's a draw.

Viewing angle- This one is clear cut, no close calls. Distinct advantage to the 8500.

Carefree viewing- How's that one for a category? Without any concern for IR, burn-in, station logos, tickers etc., the Elite shows the LED advantage. This is not to say that the IR issue can't be managed, it can. Nonetheless, Advantage Elite.

Overall PQ- I know this sounds like a cop out, but I think each one has its virtues. But if there was a gun to my head, based on such an advantage in viewing angle and other performance areas being so close, I suspect the 8500 would appeal to more people.

For me? PLEASE DON'T MAKE ME CHOOSE!!! biggrin.gif
post #169 of 254
I want to thank you Scott for the great article

Hi..new member feeling a little out of my league here...
Was up late last night reading all of Scott's article and the postings (saying this as I yawn now) oh ooops, not because of the written material but just lack of sleep from lots of late-night reading!
I must admit I am more confused than ever after reading all of it, so many specs and interpretations of what they mean, I just don't know what to believe. As a single parent I still want to make a decent tv investment but do try to be careful with my funds. (I hope I am not sharing too much as I am unfamiliar with the forum etiquette)

I am stuck between a few sets and was hoping for further insight from you or others 'in the know' here. I thank you in advance for any input given.

I am looking for 3D and smart and do understand the basics of plasma versus LED and active versus passive 3D. I prefer plasma picture but will have light in the living room (TV will be about 45 degree angle to large window) but I lean towards passive because of possible headaches from active and cost of glasses (my son breaks a lot of stuff!) I have come across about 5 models (all 2012 models I believe) that are either open box clearance, last year model clearance in a store, and one is from a person selling privately who is an ex-electronics employee (who bought 5 open boxes before quitting his job hoping to make a few bucks) and his TVs come with a remainder of year warranty from when he bought. Following are the sets and pricing I have found after much searching.
Also I will buy from the store with my Mastercard which will double manufacturers warranty.

1. Sony 55hx 850 - $1699 ( retail open box)
2. Samsung 55 ES 7150 -$1300 (private sale comes in box with glasses, qwerty key-board and about 6 months warranty)
3. Panasonic 50 GT5-$1300 (retail clearance and they were willing to throw in 2 pair of 3D glasses at no extra charge))
4. Panasonic 55 ET5 -$1299 (retail clearance)
5. LG LM 6700-$998 ( retail clearance

Oh and I just saw this morning a Sony HX 751 (includes glasses) for $ 1299 at a store ...hummm
I'm eager to hear any feedback and am grateful for forums such as these.

Thank-you all again for putting up with the newbie from Canada...Good day eh?! wink.gif
post #170 of 254
Quote:
Originally Posted by haykat View Post

4. Panasonic 55 ET5 -$1299 (retail clearance)

Too expensive. I'm not completely impressed with it (but I hate everything), and if you want it, get it from Amazon ($1099 / sold by Amazon / Prime)
http://www.amazon.com/Panasonic-TC-L55ET5-55-Inch-LED-LCD-Polarized/dp/B00752R9SM/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1365103777&sr=8-2&keywords=panasonic+et5
post #171 of 254
Thank-you!
post #172 of 254
Quote:
Originally Posted by haykat View Post


Thank-you all again for putting up with the newbie from Canada...Good day eh?! wink.gif

Take off, you hoser! And kick back with a Molson , while humming "O Canada"!

smile.gif (I can do that, because I have Canadian ancestry).
post #173 of 254
Haaha.... well you've got me pegged Mr. Irishman.
A cheeky lot on here now I would say!biggrin.gif

Anyhow, update already....Just spotted on usedvictoria a new LG 47' 7600 with 4 year transferable warranty and they are throwing in the stand, dvd player, delivering and helping me set up for $1000 ( he said he may even go down a bit and I didn't even ask!) as they are moving to Europe in a few weeks! I think that is a smashing deal!!!!
post #174 of 254
Scott , hi, I see you are online now. Wondering if you think the LG 7600 is a decent deal with all I am getting for the price ( details in latest post)
thank-you again!
post #175 of 254
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by haykat View Post

I want to thank you Scott for the great article

Hi..new member feeling a little out of my league here...
Was up late last night reading all of Scott's article and the postings (saying this as I yawn now) oh ooops, not because of the written material but just lack of sleep from lots of late-night reading!
I must admit I am more confused than ever after reading all of it, so many specs and interpretations of what they mean, I just don't know what to believe. As a single parent I still want to make a decent tv investment but do try to be careful with my funds. (I hope I am not sharing too much as I am unfamiliar with the forum etiquette)

I am stuck between a few sets and was hoping for further insight from you or others 'in the know' here. I thank you in advance for any input given.

I am looking for 3D and smart and do understand the basics of plasma versus LED and active versus passive 3D. I prefer plasma picture but will have light in the living room (TV will be about 45 degree angle to large window) but I lean towards passive because of possible headaches from active and cost of glasses (my son breaks a lot of stuff!) I have come across about 5 models (all 2012 models I believe) that are either open box clearance, last year model clearance in a store, and one is from a person selling privately who is an ex-electronics employee (who bought 5 open boxes before quitting his job hoping to make a few bucks) and his TVs come with a remainder of year warranty from when he bought. Following are the sets and pricing I have found after much searching.
Also I will buy from the store with my Mastercard which will double manufacturers warranty.

1. Sony 55hx 850 - $1699 ( retail open box)
2. Samsung 55 ES 7150 -$1300 (private sale comes in box with glasses, qwerty key-board and about 6 months warranty)
3. Panasonic 50 GT5-$1300 (retail clearance and they were willing to throw in 2 pair of 3D glasses at no extra charge))
4. Panasonic 55 ET5 -$1299 (retail clearance)
5. LG LM 6700-$998 ( retail clearance

Oh and I just saw this morning a Sony HX 751 (includes glasses) for $ 1299 at a store ...hummm
I'm eager to hear any feedback and am grateful for forums such as these.

Thank-you all again for putting up with the newbie from Canada...Good day eh?! wink.gif


Welcome haycat! AVS can be a bit intimidating for newbies, but I hope you'll hang in there! As the editor of AVS, my goal is to foster an atmosphere of education, not intimidation.

 

To your point, I recommend that you try to spend some time with 3D sets that use active and passive glasses to see if the active glasses cause you headaches. If so (and presuming you enjoy 3D content in the first place), a passive LED-LCD set from LG or Vizio is the way to go. If active glasses cause no discomfort, I tend to prefer the picture quality of plasma overall. Also, while LED-LCDs are brighter than plasmas in general, plasmas stand up just fine to some ambient light, at least if it's not shining directly on the screen, as it seems it would not in your case.

 

Of the models you list here, I think the Sony HX850 is the best LED-LCD, though I suspect the Samsung ES7150 (probably a retailer-specific version of the ES7100) is good as well. However, they both use active glasses, as does the Panasonic GT50 plasma. If you react badly to active glasses, the LG LM6700 and Panasonic ET5 are the only ones that use passive glasses. However, the LG received a lukewarm review from Cnet, an outlet that some folks don't trust very much, though I do for TV reviews based on what I know of how they conduct such reviews. If anyone has direct experience with this model, I'm all ears (well, eyes, actually!). I don't know anything about the ET5.

 

If you want to use passive 3D glasses, I suggest you look at the Vizio M3D550KD (well-reviewed but discontinued) or M3D550KDE (supposedly similar to the KD, but no reviews yet).

post #176 of 254
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by haykat View Post

Haaha.... well you've got me pegged Mr. Irishman.
A cheeky lot on here now I would say!biggrin.gif

Anyhow, update already....Just spotted on usedvictoria a new LG 47' 7600 with 4 year transferable warranty and they are throwing in the stand, dvd player, delivering and helping me set up for $1000 ( he said he may even go down a bit and I didn't even ask!) as they are moving to Europe in a few weeks! I think that is a smashing deal!!!!


Yes, a cheeky lot, indeed!

 

The LM7600 received a very positive review from Cnet. "Throwing in the stand" seems a bit odd, since all flat panels come with a stand anyway. Or do you mean a piece of furniture on which to put the TV? As for the DVD player, I hope it's really a Blu-ray player, which will play DVDs as well as Blu-rays. (If you enjoy 3D, I hope it's a 3D Blu-ray player.) $1000 is okay, especially if the extras include a furniture stand and 3D Blu-ray player. The TV itself can be bought new for around $1000.

post #177 of 254
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by haykat View Post

Scott , hi, I see you are online now. Wondering if you think the LG 7600 is a decent deal with all I am getting for the price ( details in latest post)
thank-you again!


See previous post...

post #178 of 254
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott Wilkinson View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by haykat View Post

Haaha.... well you've got me pegged Mr. Irishman.

A cheeky lot on here now I would say!biggrin.gif


Anyhow, update already....Just spotted on usedvictoria a new LG 47' 7600 with 4 year transferable warranty and they are throwing in the stand, dvd player, delivering and helping me set up for $1000 ( he said he may even go down a bit and I didn't even ask!) as they are moving to Europe in a few weeks! I think that is a smashing deal!!!!


Yes, a cheeky lot, indeed!

The LM7600 received a very positive review from Cnet. "Throwing in the stand" seems a bit odd, since all flat panels come with a stand anyway. Or do you mean a piece of furniture on which to put the TV? As for the DVD player, I hope it's really a Blu-ray player, which will play DVDs as well as Blu-rays. (If you enjoy 3D, I hope it's a 3D Blu-ray player.) $1000 is okay, especially if the extras include a furniture stand and 3D Blu-ray player. The TV itself can be bought new for around $1000.


The problem I have with a lot of reviewers is that they receive TVs before they are available in stores, which means they have to get them direct from the manufacturer (standard M.O. anyway---no one wants to pay for these things), which means they stand the very likely possibility of getting the lucky TV that exhibits no cloudiness, no edge bleed, and anything else that might vary from screen to screen. Particularly if they're from a place that employs a very loosely controlled panel lottery like a certain manufacturer that will remain unnamed (Samsung).
Edited by tgm1024 - 4/6/13 at 7:29am
post #179 of 254
Thanks for taking the time to answer re the specific TVs I enquired about Scott. Yes by stand I meant the furniture piece on which to place the set.

Also thanks TGM 1024 for the input in your last post, point taken! A 4 year warranty though, actually I guess it would be just under 4 years, would be a nice cushion if any problems do arise such as a panel lottery issue(?) Is that referring to a frequent inconsistency problem with panel quality attributed to a particular said 'unnamed' manufacturer?

Thank-you
post #180 of 254
I ended up going with a Panasonic TC_P60U50 over the Vizio E601i A3 and got it for $998.00. I wasn't interested in 3D, streaming, or an internet browser on my television. I just wanted the biggest and best picture my wife budget ($1000) would allow. Although I do watch it in a light controlled environment (man-cave in the basement) I don't have a problem watching it with daylight streaming through the two 3' x 2' glass block windows which are perpendicular to the screen. I have an ambient light placed behind the screen for "critical" viewing at night which also reduces eye strain. To my eye plasma has better color, deeper blacks, superior viewing angle, and no motion blur.

I guess I really don't understand the griping about screen reflections. Has everyone forgotten that we all used to have CRT's that were MUCH worse at handling reflections? I've also read the complaints about the lack of brightness of of plasma tv's and IR/burn-in. Then I see your contrast settings posted; 100, 88, 93, 85 etc. It makes me scratch my head because after calibrating with my Spears and Munsil disc my contrast is at 46. Plenty bright for a darkened room, no image retention, and very little color cast. Oh, and I WISH they threw off as much heat as claimed by some in this thread. Wisconsin winters, and basements, are mighty chilly!

Thank you Scott, for a great thread and for countless informative articles over the years.
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