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Why are blu-rays still so expensive? - Page 15

post #421 of 480
Packaged media is a steal. Especially if you are like me and can wait awhile to buy a movie. I have enough content and other activities going on in my life that I can usually wait 4+ weeks after a movie is released on home video and usually find the movie for $9-14 new and often even cheaper used.

I just picked up 6 used movies at Hastings for $22 shipped (all of them recent releases from this year). For the quality, you can't beat that and it is far cheaper than going to the theater or even renting it release week digitally.

I expect one day this gravy train will end. Once the shift is entirely towards digital for movies, music, and video games, I believe we will see prices increase as studios will have much more control on pricing and how you can watch content.

But I am enjoying it as much as I can and buying movies fully expecting this to be the best version I can get for 10-15 years or more for most of these movies.
Edited by ack_bk - 10/14/13 at 10:31am
post #422 of 480
Quote:
Originally Posted by Matt_Stevens View Post

They are not too expensive. They murder DVD all over the place so should cost more.

They are cheaper than Laserdisc ever was.

Unfortunately we now have a download for free culture that has created this content is too expensive theory. Well, that contest cost money to write, produce, create and then release.

Yup.
post #423 of 480
I think catalog titles are fairly priced on Blu-ray from the major studios. They might even be cheaper than expected. I do have issues with some of the pricing tactics pulled now on new releases.
post #424 of 480
Well, people also need to factor in inflation and local taxes. A brand new release DVD in 1999 that cost $15 would cost you $21 in 2013 just based on inflation alone. Not to mention you are typically getting a much better quality release vs DVD.
post #425 of 480
Really? Was it necessary to bump this thread?? !!! It's attracting too many trolls. It's best to let it die.
post #426 of 480
removed dbl post
post #427 of 480
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wendell R. Breland View Post



in 1965 a model similar to the one shown below sold for $600.00 (that's $4,386 in 2013 $s) and was in a black metal case with four plain spindle legs. The model shown would have been much more.






Edit: The average price for a table top 19" B&W was around $200.00 ($1462.00)


Actually that one pictured above looks more like a 1957 or 1958 RCA CTC 7 with frt glass , similar but 8 yrs prior to 1965 CTC 15.


A similar CTC 7 would have been closer to $795.00 1957 dollars it would have cost about $6,616.80 in today's dollars clearly they were a luxury in 1957

Four of those TV's would exceed the cost of a new 1957 Ford Fairlane Victoria Hardtop at $2439.00 and equal the cost of a 1957 Buick 40 Special again not an insignificant amount of money in 1957

Additionally there were only a few hours of color programing a week then primarily on the RCA owned (at the time ) NBC network .


The 1957- 58 CTC 7 had 26 vacuum tubes in addition to the CRT the 1965 CTC 15 had 23 tubes + CRT consumer technology moved a bit slower then. Nonetheless the CTC 15 was greatly improved over the earlier models .

The 1957- 58 CTC 7 http://www.earlytelevision.org/rca_ctc-7.htm



The 1962 CTC 11 without safety glass

http://antiqueradio.org/art/RCACTC-11FinalCabinet.jpg


My parents didn't get our first color set until late 1962 ,a 63 model CTC 12 .


In 1964 - 1965 -1966 RCA CTC 16 models were the last roundie sets, they sold that model for at least 3 yrs until the CTC 16 rectangulars
were more popular. I belive production *may* have stopped in 65

1964 - 1966 RCA CTC 15 last roundie
http://www.ct-tv.50megs.com/photo6.html

By that time you could buy a 21" color roundie for $395.00 with trade probably $495.00 or less without.
Those big roundies required frequent repair and servicing RCA sold many of them with service contracts .


By 1966 the remaining roundies were heavily discounted as the new rectangular sets were in full production .

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-dxQILtP2aGI/T44gY2ZA43I/AAAAAAAAiZQ/JYkRBLiH8gM/s1600/File1132.jpg
Edited by tubetwister - 10/14/13 at 10:36pm
post #428 of 480
Quote:
Originally Posted by sunnyli View Post

This is also what I‘m thinking about... the price of a Blu-ray disc... Indeed, something is worthy of discussion.smile.gif

lots of them right here all you could ever want biggrin.gif

http://www.amazon.com/Best-Sellers-Movies-TV-Blu-ray/zgbs/movies-tv/2958935011/ref=MoviesBDBB_Category_Best_Sellers?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=left-1&pf_rd_r=1V2S4WJRXVEX3F3VGRBB&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p=1578480222&pf_rd_i=2901953011
post #429 of 480
Quote:
Originally Posted by adidino View Post

The prices do go down.. I paid $35 for Star Trek movie box set. That's 6 movies. I also paid $19 for the Alien box set. That was another great deal. Just need to wait it out. Day 1 releases are not going to be bargains and never will but $23 is not expensive.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MrHT View Post

Whatever you say, dude.....

So counter his argument with reasoned logic and proof. Saying "whatever you say, dude" isn't getting your point across. $23 for a new release BD isn't expensive especially when you think of the ROI it provides. That $10 lunch I just ate is way more overpriced comparetively since any ROI I will receive won't make itself apparent until tomorrow and I doubt I'll be as impressed. biggrin.gif
post #430 of 480
$23.00 lunch might br a different story biggrin.gif
post #431 of 480
Quote:
Originally Posted by ack_bk View Post

Packaged media is a steal. Especially if you are like me and can wait awhile to buy a movie. I have enough content and other activities going on in my life that I can usually wait 4+ weeks after a movie is released on home video and usually find the movie for $9-14 new and often even cheaper used.

I just picked up 6 used movies at Hastings for $22 shipped (all of them recent releases from this year). For the quality, you can't beat that and it is far cheaper than going to the theater or even renting it release week digitally.

I expect one day this gravy train will end. Once the shift is entirely towards digital for movies, music, and video games, I believe we will see prices increase as studios will have much more control on pricing and how you can watch content.

But I am enjoying it as much as I can and buying movies fully expecting this to be the best version I can get for 10-15 years or more for most of these movies.

I fear the consumer is losing control, but I also don't think that going to streaming/downloading means the studios can get away jacking up the pricing. When no physical copy is available the intrinsic value of the product disappears.
post #432 of 480
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toknowshita View Post

I fear the consumer is losing control, but I also don't think that going to streaming/downloading means the studios can get away jacking up the pricing. When no physical copy is available the intrinsic value of the product disappears.
2013 idea. In 2020 this idea will make no sense.
post #433 of 480
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toknowshita View Post

I fear the consumer is losing control, but I also don't think that going to streaming/downloading means the studios can get away jacking up the pricing. When no physical copy is available the intrinsic value of the product disappears.

Well, I think the days of $1-2 rentals (Redbox) and finding newer release titles a few weeks after release for $9-14 will be tough. Also the whole used market goes away and I buy a ton of used movies. Case in point Gohastings recently had a 30% off sale on used Blu-Ray movies and I picked up 6 recent release movies for $22 shipped.

For me, digital will equal rental. But I suspect the price I will be paying to rent movies digitally will be more than what I can own them for now on optical disc with a nice package and bonus features.
post #434 of 480
Quote:
Originally Posted by ack_bk View Post

Well, I think the days of $1-2 rentals (Redbox) and finding newer release titles a few weeks after release for $9-14 will be tough. Also the whole used market goes away and I buy a ton of used movies. Case in point Gohastings recently had a 30% off sale on used Blu-Ray movies and I picked up 6 recent release movies for $22 shipped.

For me, digital will equal rental. But I suspect the price I will be paying to rent movies digitally will be more than what I can own them for now on optical disc with a nice package and bonus features.

While digital May equal rental to you...digital means purchase to me. The studios will still be selling their products to us. The studios love windowing and they will continuing to monetize their films and tv shows. This means transactional rental, sale and subscriptions will continue into the future.

I also do not believe this will be an all digital download future as many many people prefer physical media. I don't think there is anything that states it has to be an either/or market (physical or digital). We have had many ways in the past to get video into our homes and I believe we, the consumer will continue to have a choice.
post #435 of 480
Quote:
Originally Posted by adidino
The prices do go down.. I paid $35 for Star Trek movie box set. That's 6 movies. I also paid $19 for the Alien box set. That was another great deal. Just need to wait it out. Day 1 releases are not going to be bargains and never will but $23 is not expensive.

Good price Amazon is showing new boxed sets ~ $ 28.00 to $35.00 +
Quote:
Originally Posted by ack_bk

Well, I think the days of $1-2 rentals (Redbox) and finding newer release titles a few weeks after release for $9-14 will be tough.

Red Box box selection is pretty limited at the Kiosks . I look on line and reserve mine because if do not often what you wan't will be gone .
OTOH Amazon Prime and Amazon instant have a great selection instant gratification also digital purchase and or download also .
Red Box has only a comparatively few movies in their boxes. Ofc BB and other don't have huge DVD isles anymore either .

Quote:
Originally posted by TowerGrove
I also do not believe this will be an all digital download future as many many people prefer physical media. I don't think there is anything that states it has to be an either/or market (physical or digital). We have had many ways in the past to get video into our homes and I believe we, the consumer will continue to have a choice.

One can always hope but you clearly can see what happened with iTunes and mp3 content in general as opposed to CDR 16/44.1 .
People buy bit starved lossy encoded mp3 they will do the same with ( just good enough bit starved HD on line streaming) just like I do .
Blue Ray will replace DVD eventually but as premium media at a price premium similar to what it enjoys now.
Keep in mind Blue Ray has stronger digital copyright protections or DRM + HDCP so that is another reason studios will move away from DVD.
People will get over not having physical media iTunes, Pandora ,Rhapsody and mp3 in general have already successfully proven that.

Business serves themselves first and foremost (profitability)* some times consumers get lucky and the two coincide sometimes not.
Anybody remember free FM radio that wasn't overly compressed not all commercials or fully automated ? How about AM radio that actually played music ?
Edited by tubetwister - 10/18/13 at 10:22pm
post #436 of 480
Quote:
Originally Posted by TowerGrove View Post

While digital May equal rental to you...digital means purchase to me. The studios will still be selling their products to us. The studios love windowing and they will continuing to monetize their films and tv shows. This means transactional rental, sale and subscriptions will continue into the future.

I also do not believe this will be an all digital download future as many many people prefer physical media. I don't think there is anything that states it has to be an either/or market (physical or digital). We have had many ways in the past to get video into our homes and I believe we, the consumer will continue to have a choice.

I agree physical will always be here to some extent, at least on the major new releases as well as on tent pole catalogs. Collectors want to collect "something". Digital sell through's main attraction, at least initially, will be the slightly lower price coupled with a favorable release window over disc. Once studios start release movies like Iron Man 3 or The Croods 3-4 weeks ahead of disc, then you'll start getting a lot of takers. Also, I think UV is supposed to have the CFF come out soon? That should make a digital purchase even more enticing. But it remains to be seen how much traction it can gain as a sell through format and I think it will probably remain primarily rental (except for TV shows perhaps, as it can sometimes be cheaper to own a TV series than to rent it). Although if 4k doesn't come to physical format then you'll see a fair bit of digital sell through on that.
post #437 of 480
Quote:
Originally Posted by tubetwister View Post

Good price Amazon is showing new boxed sets ~ $ 28.00 to $35.00 +
Red Box box selection is pretty limited at the Kiosks . I look on line and reserve mine because if do not often what you wan't will be gone .
OTOH Amazon Prime and Amazon instant have a great selection instant gratification also digital purchase and or download also .
Red Box has only a comparatively few movies in their boxes. Ofc BB and other don't have huge DVD isles anymore either .
One can always hope but you clearly can see what happened with iTunes and mp3 content in general as opposed to CDR 16/44.1 .
People buy bit starved lossy encoded mp3 they will do the same with ( just good enough bit starved HD on line streaming) just like I do .
Blue Ray will replace DVD eventually but as premium media at a price premium similar to what it enjoys now.
Keep in mind Blue Ray has stronger digital copyright protections or DRM + HDCP so that is another reason studios will move away from DVD.
People will get over not having physical media iTunes, Pandora ,Rhapsody and mp3 in general have already successfully proven that.

Business serves themselves first and foremost (profitability)* some times consumers get lucky and the two coincide sometimes not.
Anybody remember free FM radio that wasn't overly compressed not all commercials or fully automated ? How about AM radio that actually played music ?

If people have gotten over physical media the why is such a large chunk of sales still in the physical media category? That said, I have really been warming up to my Ultraviolet collection lately.
I like iTunes for my audio purchases but you mention pandora and rhapsody, they are popular they are not sale formats, but rental and still considered niche. It has been said many times in the trade press that the studios prefer a sale because they make much more off it than a rental. I don't believe this will be an either or world when it comes to media. It's already been proven with MOD and the Warner Archive that small runs can make a profit and be successful.
post #438 of 480
Quote:
Originally Posted by bruceames View Post

I agree physical will always be here to some extent, at least on the major new releases as well as on tent pole catalogs. Collectors want to collect "something". Digital sell through's main attraction, at least initially, will be the slightly lower price coupled with a favorable release window over disc. Once studios start release movies like Iron Man 3 or The Croods 3-4 weeks ahead of disc, then you'll start getting a lot of takers. Also, I think UV is supposed to have the CFF come out soon? That should make a digital purchase even more enticing. But it remains to be seen how much traction it can gain as a sell through format and I think it will probably remain primarily rental (except for TV shows perhaps, as it can sometimes be cheaper to own a TV series than to rent it). Although if 4k doesn't come to physical format then you'll see a fair bit of digital sell through on that.

Hi Bruce! I'm really looking forward to the UV CFF. Long overdue IMO.
post #439 of 480
Quote:
Originally Posted by tubetwister View Post


Blue Ray will replace DVD eventually but as premium media at a price premium similar to what it enjoys now.
Keep in mind Blue Ray has stronger digital copyright protections or DRM + HDCP so that is another reason studios will move away from DVD.
People will get over not having physical media iTunes, Pandora ,Rhapsody and mp3 in general have already successfully proven that.

Blu-ray's copy protection advantage over DVD is trivial. Very easy to remove copy protection from BD's. If the advantage were not trivial, then studios would be more aggressive in moving away from DVD. Instead, they embrace it, and it's still responsible for over 70% of disc sales. What studio's really want is far more control, such as the following level of controls (copied from an article about proposed 4k copy protection)

Quote:
Title-by-title diversity, so that a technique used to hack one movie title doesn’t necessarily apply to another

Requiring players to authenticate themselves online before playback, which enables hacked players to be denied but makes it impossible to play 4k content without an Internet connection

The use of HDCP 2.2 to protect digital outputs, since older versions of HDCP have been hacked

Session-based watermarking, so that each 4k file is marked with the identity of the device or user that downloaded it (a technique used today with early-window HD content)

The use of trusted execution environments (TEE) for playback, which combine the security of hardware with the renewability of software
post #440 of 480
Quote:
Re ? / bruceames
I agree physical will always be here to some extent, at least on the major new releases as well as on tent pole catalogs. Collectors want to collect "something". Digital sell through's main attraction, at least initially, will be the slightly lower price coupled with a favorable release window over disc. Once studios start release movies like Iron Man 3 or The Croods 3-4 weeks ahead of disc, then you'll start getting a lot of takers. Also, I think UV is supposed to have the CFF come out soon? That should make a digital purchase even more enticing. But it remains to be seen how much traction it can gain as a sell through format and I think it will probably remain primarily rental (except for TV shows perhaps, as it can sometimes be cheaper to own a TV series than to rent it). Although if 4k doesn't come to physical format then you'll see a fair bit of digital sell through on that.

I'm certainly no expert in the media or media distribution area . I've seen a lot of media storage formats come and go from the 60's forward though starting with RTR tape and vinyl and of course the decline of Am/Fm radio in general as well as OTA broadcast TV . Actually I'm surprised metal platter HDD's have lasted as long as they have ofc they will be less utilized being replaced either by the cloud or solid state and or possibly some kind of organic storage . I believe Google Chromebooks , MS office 365 ,and Photoshop Creative Cloud (all cloud based ) have demonstrated the direction that PC's will evolve .

It stands to reason that entertainment consumption to some extent will follow as it does now but to what extent ?


With Sony electronics exit from CD, DVD, Blu-ray PC drive business, altogether it kind of makes me wonder what the future direction in general for entertainment media .

. UV is convenient I have some at Amazon . . ofc Netflix and Amazon prime instant are cool although bit starved HD . 4 K is big unknown I don't think it will move online much at least not streaming anyway due to data file sizes . seems pointless to compress BD in that marketspace also. It is true nothing beats a Blue Ray disc for picture quality at least in the 2K format .
I read that Singulus Technologies has sold a 4K 3 layer 100gb Blue Ray disk replicator who knows what Sony and Philips and maybe Toshiba may do there was some talk of a 500GB optical data disc .
Quote:
Blu-ray's copy protection advantage over DVD is trivial. Very easy to remove copy protection from BD's. If the advantage were not trivial, then studios would be more aggressive in moving away from DVD. Instead, they embrace it, and it's still responsible for over 70% of disc sales. What studio's really want is far more control, such as the following level of controls (copied from an article about proposed 4k copy protection)

You might well know more about that than I it's certainly is very easy to make a bit perfect copy of a commercial DVD on a PC now that's true .
It can be done in 7 minutes . I think it was Microsoft or Sony not sure that was going to implement the on line DRM authentication protection on PS4 or Xbox 1 until they got hammered in the press. .they may still do that to what extent I don't know. I'm sticking with my PS3 for now .
I wasn't aware the movie studios or other content providers were looking into that not surprising to hear that at all now that you mention it it makes sense that they would.

best regards
post #441 of 480
Quote:
Originally Posted by tubetwister View Post

I'm certainly no expert in the media or media distribution area . I've seen a lot of media storage formats come and go from the 60's forward though starting with RTR tape and vinyl and of course the decline of Am/Fm radio in general as well as OTA broadcast TV . Actually I'm surprised metal platter HDD's have lasted as long as they have ofc they will be less utilized being replaced either by the cloud or solid state and or possibly some kind of organic storage .
Quote:
I believe Google Chromebooks , MS office 365 ,and Photoshop Creative Cloud (all cloud based ) have demonstrated the direction that PC's will evolve .

It stands to reason that entertainment consumption to some extent will follow as it does now but to what extent ?


With Sony electronics exit from CD, DVD, Blu-ray PC drive business, altogether it kind of makes me wonder what the future direction in general for entertainment media .

. UV is convenient I have some at Amazon . . ofc Netflix and Amazon prime instant are cool although bit starved HD . 4 K is big unknown I don't think it will move online much at least not streaming anyway due to data file sizes . seems pointless to compress BD in that marketspace also. It is true nothing beats a Blue Ray disc for picture quality at least in the 2K format .
I read that Singulus Technologies has sold a 4K 3 layer 100gb Blue Ray disk replicator who knows what Sony and Philips and maybe Toshiba may do there was some talk of a 500GB optical data disc .
You might well know more about that than I it's certainly is very easy to make a bit perfect copy of a commercial DVD on a PC now that's true .
It can be done in 7 minutes . I think it was Microsoft or Sony not sure that was going to implement the on line DRM authentication protection on PS4 or Xbox 1 until they got hammered in the press. .they may still do that to what extent I don't know. I'm sticking with my PS3 for now .
I wasn't aware the movie studios or other content providers were looking into that not surprising to hear that at all now that you mention it it makes sense that they would.

best regards

Google chrome books have proven to be less than stellar in the marketplace http://m.slashdot.org/story/185881 and both Microsoft and Adobe have received very negative reviews on their subscription services in regards to the consumer market. People don't want yet another subscription to pay for each month. It's been said in the media with netflix, cable tv subs and all these other services in peoples lives that subscription fatigue is setting in. The consumer will decide the direction tech will go with their wallets.

Also while Sony doesn't produce Bluray PC drives they will be front and center in the new ps4 and they still make bluray home drives for your television.
Edited by TowerGrove - 10/19/13 at 6:52pm
post #442 of 480
Quote:
Re/Sarah :

If people have gotten over physical media the why is such a large chunk of sales still in the physical media category? That said, I have really been warming up to my Ultraviolet collection lately.
I like iTunes for my audio purchases but you mention pandora and rhapsody, they are popular they are not sale formats, but rental and still considered niche. It has been said many times in the trade press that the studios prefer a sale because they make much more off it than a rental. I don't believe this will be an either or world when it comes to media. It's already been proven with MOD and the Warner Archive that small runs can make a profit and be successful.

Profit is key to your point as long as physical media sales are numerically profitable it will be around how long ? OTOH 4 K Blue Ray will likely require 3 or 4 layer BD Discs it may well be less expensive to the end user than the bandwidth required to distribute on line it in masse due to the large data file size but there is also nothing to stop the content providers/servicers to continue 2K data streams

. Acceptable 4K compression technology may well evolve but at what point will that resolve between bandwidth costs vs image quality vs 4K BD disk cost to the end user lots of yet to be answered questions to be sure and to your point no one answer fits . I like my slowly growing UV collection also.
OTOH Nothing beats a Blue Ray disc for image quality ,detail and color depth. (Chroma dynamic range ) so that is my occasional premium stuff .

Ofc there is the problem also of under served areas as far as affordable internet bandwidth goes also .

If I could predict the future with certainly I would start a brokerage firm or hedge fund and then buy some Malibu Beach properties and maybe and Island or two . like what's his name , ..... Larry Ellison !

best regards
Edited by tubetwister - 10/19/13 at 7:07pm
post #443 of 480
Quote:
Originally Posted by TowerGrove View Post

Google chrome books have proven to be less than stellar in the marketplace http://m.slashdot.org/story/185881 and both Microsoft and Adobe have received very negative reviews on their subscription services in regards to the consumer market. People don't want yet another subscription to pay for each month. It's been said in the media with netflix, cable tv subs and all these other services in peoples lives that subscription fatigue is setting in. The consumer will decide the direction tech will go with their wallets.

Also while Sony doesn't produce Bluray PC drives they will be front and center in the new ps4 and they still make bluray home drives for your television.

Hopefully Sony Electronics as we know it will still be in business in the future it's good that both Sony entertainment and the Sony Electronics business units have
the behemoth cash rich Sony insurance and financial services arm with deep pockets for a sugar daddy if need be .

Sony overall FY 1st quarter profits ( April 1, 2013 to June 30, 2013 ) while a very small percentage of revenue were encouraging despite declining sales.and profits . It seems the movie business is in a little better shape (not great ) than the device business. while the sound and music business units are better yet .

Some of the newer Chromebooks are evolving with some local storage and more powerful X86 Intel Celeron and core i3 i5 embedded processors and it is likely the Chrome OS and apps will evolve to utilize that additional power The new Chromebooks with these features are considerably faster .

I agree Google Drive/Google Docs could be faster and more functional . So I"m not ready to loose MS Office just yet. I used SAP over Unix at work for years
more lately always connected. SAP/Unix is fast in the cloud that I can tell you. I suspect Chrome OS will evolve in that direction with added speed and functionality
Actually if they just sort it out a bit it will satisfy the needs of the majority of the home users and considering the tablet market I'm sure Google has thought of that it is certainly within their capabilities and far superior to a PC tablet .
. Once they sort it out.*if they sort it out give it some additional functionality they could even put an optional touch screen GUI in it .
and with Acer ,Samsung ,HP and other vendor partners it could evolve . Don't know if it will but it could..

Chrome is developing windows apps to run Chrome applications (other than a browser or Google drive/docs ) within windows without much if any significant overhead penalty..
that's something M$ and many others should be wary of Google has very good code writers not to mention deep pockets .I saw good code with their first search engine and later with the browser.
I will have to read the article you linked thank you for posting that never hurts to learn something . and to your point about subscriptions that certainly has validity I have my share here .

.

I remember outside of enterprise when we all voted with our wallets and still do with Microsoft.windows ............. Because we had no choice, they ruled the roost with whatever they wanted to give us for many years .and still do but there are Linux and Apple now for the malcontents ,
, I have a Linux Ubuntu partition on this drive it is fast OS (but not for average home user) I use Windows 7x64 on 2 PC's at home here most of the time
it's actually pretty decent ..

best regards
.
Edited by tubetwister - 10/20/13 at 1:25am
post #444 of 480
Quote:
Originally Posted by TowerGrove View Post

People don't want yet another subscription to pay for each month.
Indeed. Gas, electricity, water, garbage, and two phone companies are enough for me. I love to OWN things and hate to pay companies to USE their stuff.
post #445 of 480
Quote:
Originally Posted by tubetwister View Post

I'm certainly no expert in the media or media distribution area . I've seen a lot of media storage formats come and go from the 60's forward though starting with RTR tape and vinyl and of course the decline of Am/Fm radio in general as well as OTA broadcast TV . Actually I'm surprised metal platter HDD's have lasted as long as they have ofc they will be less utilized being replaced either by the cloud or solid state and or possibly some kind of organic storage . I believe Google Chromebooks , MS office 365 ,and Photoshop Creative Cloud (all cloud based ) have demonstrated the direction that PC's will evolve .

It stands to reason that entertainment consumption to some extent will follow as it does now but to what extent ?
The problem is, streaming and cloud based applications are not inherently good for the consumer. They're sold that way, but are not intended to be customer friendly. They are intended to be friendly to the bottom line.

While they may offer some benefits in regards to portability and always being up to date, the primary justification for the push in this direction is copyright protection and profit.

Copyright protection is all but impossible on anything where you have a physical copy. It's much easier to lock something down if you never send the whole thing to anyone. Whenever you have a disc, it requires the encryption to be broken by the reader in order to read it. If it's in the cloud, it becomes a web transaction that only works for that session. It has to be reset and renewed for the next one.

In regards to profit, the idea is to make people pay indefinitely for something they never own. The big issue with physical media is you can keep using it at no additional cost until there comes a time when the hardware or software needed to use it are no longer available. It's the same reason you won't find a washing machine or refridgerator that lasts 20 or 30 years any more. There's no profit in buying once.

Cloud media isn't for the consumer: it's for the company that leases it to you.
post #446 of 480
Please keep on the topic of why Blu-rays are so expensive. Please take streaming to the streaming forum.

Thanks,

S~
post #447 of 480
Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles [Blu-ray] (2012) Price $12.48 & FREE Shipping
Amazon

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles DVD new $5.00 + shipping
Amazon

bet the origionl DVD was more than both of these together go figure.


I picked up Star Trek Into Darknesss BD/DVD combo at Amazon for $24.98
No DVD only availiable AFAIK Other sellers at Amazon have it for as low as $17.98
most however are ~$24.00 +

Star Trek (2009) BD only is $14.88 @ Amazon

Seems like BD prices vary just like DVD accounting for inflation from lets say the early 90's they might well average out cheaper all in all.
post #448 of 480
Quote:
Originally Posted by pcweber111 View Post


So counter his argument with reasoned logic and proof.

No. I don't feed trolls. Sorry. I already said what I had to say, so if he still wants to argue, I won't bite. I'll just agree to disagree.
post #449 of 480
Quote:
Originally Posted by pcweber111 View Post

That $10 lunch I just ate is way more overpriced comparetively since any ROI I will receive won't make itself apparent until tomorrow and I doubt I'll be as impressed. biggrin.gif

I wish other people can keep that in mind. I buy a $100 complete series box set on BD and all my friends and relatives look at me like I'm throwing my money away, yet they can spend $200+ eating out at a fancy restaurant and suddenly, it's no problem.

Maybe I can try this one more time and if people are going to continue arguing, then I'll give up again..... BDs are not expensive per se. They are expensive in a way that prices seem to be rising. When VHS and DVDs came out, new releases keep dropping in price as the formats matured. But with BDs, that doesn't seem to be the case and here's an example... when Iron Man 2 and The Avengers came out, I was able to buy them at many retailers for $20 or less. It is now 2013 and Iron Man 3 was available at many retailers for $23. Suddenly, we're going up in price. Not sure why....
Edited by MrHT - 10/23/13 at 2:44pm
post #450 of 480
Well I've seen many subsequent releases get cheaper so who knows, might just be the retailers you visited? I'm sure we could all quote anecdotal evidence to back our assumptions. Regardless I guess for me the value of the releases now are higher than they were with DVD. Of course you'd hope that happens with new technologies so there's that. Still, I agree with you on people's assumptions that spending money on movies like this is a waste. I've done plenty expensive dinners and paid happily because of the experiences and subsequent memories but I do place a good value on what money can buy me with BD so I don't really see them as expensive. Just my .02 of course.
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