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Assassin's Intel NUC Review - Page 9

post #241 of 576
Quote:
Originally Posted by shortcut3d View Post

I'm fine recording six shows and playing back two. The problem is iSCSI seems to take whatever network route it pleases and strongly prefers LAN1 on the NAS. Not a problem with one iSCSI Initiator, but will be an issue with two. The NAS has four gigabit LAN ports so I should be able to support up to 3 iSCSI on dedicated NICs.

 

Without clustering you can't have two connections to one target so you wouldn't be able to share recordings. Outside of creating a share (of the iSCSI target/drive) on PC a and letting PC b access it.

post #242 of 576
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles R View Post

Without clustering you can't have two connections to one target so you wouldn't be able to share recordings. Outside of creating a share (of the iSCSI target/drive) on PC a and letting PC b access it.

I am well aware of the limitations of iSCSI and sharing LUNs.

I would create multiple LUNs for each HTPC for buffer and recording. I would then move recordings that could be shared to a share on the general NAS volume. The problem is all iSCSI traffic seems to transit over LAN1 instead of one of the other 4 LANs on the NAS.
post #243 of 576
Hey all,...

Someone asked me to do a video showing Aeon Nox running on an i3 NUC / Win8,... so here they are. A little crude, but they could be of some help for beginners wanting to know what the skin looks like, w/ options. Also, I recorded these at 1080p, so they should look decent high res and full screen on YouTube.

Part 1:

Part 2:

and a last clip showing how well the NUC runs the 40mbps Birds test.

thanks again;
Legion
post #244 of 576
I understand it's more powerful, but how does this compare to the Shuttle XS35-GSV3L in terms of being part of a first-timer's home media center that is in an apartment living room? I mainly want to run XBMC for vids and music from my Synology NAS and stream Hulu.
I've got an Epson EMP-TW600 projector and 40" Aquos (LC-40LX1) on a Sharp AN-AR410 tv rack.
post #245 of 576
Quote:
Originally Posted by TeflonDog View Post

I understand it's more powerful, but how does this compare to the Shuttle XS35-GSV3L in terms of being part of a first-timer's home media center that is in an apartment living room? I mainly want to run XBMC for vids and music from my Synology NAS and stream Hulu.
I've got an Epson EMP-TW600 projector and 40" Aquos (LC-40LX1) on a Sharp AN-AR410 tv rack.

It's a great first build and looks good in a AV rack or center (as nice or nicer than many streaming boxes at the same size). I also use it with a Synology DS1813+ NAS and it works flawlessly. Your specs do not call for recording or playing back live TV. Things get a little more challenging when you want to use this for recording, which is likely beyond a beginner build.
post #246 of 576
Quote:
Originally Posted by TeflonDog View Post

I understand it's more powerful, but how does this compare to the Shuttle XS35-GSV3L in terms of being part of a first-timer's home media center that is in an apartment living room? I mainly want to run XBMC for vids and music from my Synology NAS and stream Hulu.

 

I love the NUC's form factor but ended up going with a Shuttle once again (i3 chip for $85) the XH61V. Simply because of the ability to reconfigure it down the road. I have already done just that... swapped the 120GB SSD for a 1TB 2.5" drive.

post #247 of 576
Quote:
Originally Posted by shortcut3d View Post

It's a great first build and looks good in a AV rack or center

Are you referring to the NUC or the Shuttle?

Anyway, yeah, I'm not planning to do any recording. Not much on TV for me to record in Japan! :P
post #248 of 576
Quote:
Originally Posted by Charles R View Post

ended up going with a Shuttle once again (i3 chip for $85) the XH61V. Simply because of the ability to reconfigure it down the road. I have already done just that... swapped the 120GB SSD for a 1TB 2.5" drive.

cheers. which OS do you run on your Shuttle? I am trying to get pros and cons of Openelec vs Win7 vs any other suggestions.
post #249 of 576
Quote:
Originally Posted by TeflonDog View Post

Are you referring to the NUC or the Shuttle?

Anyway, yeah, I'm not planning to do any recording. Not much on TV for me to record in Japan! :P

I was referring to the Intel NUC. Obviously the aesthetics are subjective. IMHO, the NUC is perfect to replace streaming devices. Don't get me wrong, it can also record and serve extenders. However, you need a drive hanging off of it, which defeats the form factor in the first place. The other option is to use iSCSI, which works fine. You add many variables to handle when troubleshooting and better have a solid gigabit network (which is probably easier to accomplish than many are led to believe).
post #250 of 576
Quote:
Originally Posted by TeflonDog View Post


cheers. which OS do you run on your Shuttle? I am trying to get pros and cons of Openelec vs Win7 vs any other suggestions.

 

For (only) XBMC I'd go with OpenELEC... on my Shuttle I have Windows Pro 8.1 Preview with Media Center. Which expires after the first of the year so I have until then to decide what I want to do. I'm using WMC on it and I have been less than impressed with Live TV/DVRing via XBMC so OpenELEC isn't currently an option. Hopefully by next year that will change.

post #251 of 576
Quote:
Originally Posted by TeflonDog View Post

cheers. which OS do you run on your Shuttle? I am trying to get pros and cons of Openelec vs Win7 vs any other suggestions.
FWIW, if you decide on OpenELEC there is also the Celeron 847 (dual core) NUC that is considerably less expensive than the Shuttle (at least here in the US...not sure about Japan) but still considerably more powerful than the Atom powered Shuttle. Even the Celeron version will do fine with OpenELEC with 1080p video and HD Audio bit streaming. It's really only running a full Windows OS (7 or 8) where the advantage of the i3 (and HD4000 GPU) really comes into play, IMHO. And with OpenELAC you don't even really need a HD or SSD as its very lightweight and will boot off an attached USB thumb-drive if desired.
Edited by bluechunks - 8/3/13 at 2:04pm
post #252 of 576
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluechunks View Post

FWIW, if you decide on OpenELEC there is also the Celeron 847 (dual core) NUC that is considerably less expensive than the Shuttle (at least here in the US...not sure about Japan)
The NUC is 16,600 yen (~170 USD) compared to 15,000 yen for the Shuttle, so it's a few bucks more but not by much in Japan.[/quote]
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluechunks View Post

It's really only running a full Windows OS (7 or 8) where the advantage of the i3 (and HD4000 GPU) really comes into play, IMHO. And with OpenELAC you don't even really need a HD or SSD as its very lightweight and will boot off an attached USB thumb-drive if desired.

I've started to question whether I want a stand alone STB simply for XBMC (which I figure i would only run openelec) or if I'd use it for other things (web browsing, downloading, etc) in which case i'd install windows. i really want a fast-loading (and smooth-running) media centre though, so perhaps stand alone is the way to go.

will take a look around the forums for openelec vs windows threads. (although all this patient research is driving me crazy!) wink.gif
post #253 of 576
I just realized that i will need a web browser to watch NFL Gamepass ... so no openelec for me. Guess I'll install win8 and just resist the urge to install much on it. :P
I do not want choppy video or need to drop the resolution. i want crisp, clear and fast.
Given that, which box/chipset is recommended for streaming HD from the internet? is atom capable or it sounds like the i3 is the way to go? any other recommendations?
Edited by TeflonDog - 8/4/13 at 7:22am
post #254 of 576
Quote:
Originally Posted by TeflonDog View Post

I've started to question whether I want a stand alone STB simply for XBMC (which I figure i would only run openelec) or if I'd use it for other things (web browsing, downloading, etc) in which case i'd install windows. i really want a fast-loading (and smooth-running) media centre though, so perhaps stand alone is the way to go.
FWIW, there's also a massive thread about the NUC on the XBMC forum.

Condensed version:
- The Celeron version of the NUC is awesome (and good enough) for OpenELEC, even booting from a USB thumb drive or over the network. XBMC is very fast, smooth, and responsive with OpenELEC on the Celeron version since OpenELEC is so 'lightweight'. In addition, the latest versions of Intel's BIOS and OpenELEC have fixed the small issues that early adopters experienced. There's even a video on youtube of a user that has OpenELEC stored on his Synology NAS and network boots the NUC without any local storage except for RAM. Yikes.

- Get the i3 or i5 with a mSATA SSD to run Windows 7/8. The Celeron version does fine simply running Windows with minimal multi-tasking, but the more powerful HD4000 GPU is useful for the GUI and the i3/i5 is better for multi-tasking and with Windows services running in the background. The fast SSD is also a key component to making it run smooth under Windows.

I simply want a fast, simple, XBMC device so I ordered the Celeron NUC.
post #255 of 576
Quote:
Originally Posted by TeflonDog View Post

I do not want choppy video or need to drop the resolution. i want crisp, clear and fast.
In that case, forget the Atom if you plan to run Windows. In the Intel hierarchy: Core i5==>Core i3==>Celeron==>Atom.

In the NUCs the i3/i5 versions use the HD4000 GPU instead of the HD2000 found in the Celeron so by going with the i3/i5 it's a multifaceted increase in performance. The i3/i5 in the NUCs also support hyper-threading so Windows 'sees' four CPU cores instead of two in the Celeron. In addition, two of the additions with the HD4000 GPU are ClearVideo and QuickSync (for hardware accelerated video encoding.)
Edited by bluechunks - 8/4/13 at 7:50am
post #256 of 576
Great info! Thanks!
I will start looking into going with the i3.
post #257 of 576
I have 2 i3 NUCs... One is my Media Server and the other is my CQC Server. I run OpenELEC/XBMC on one and Win7 on the other. I watch 90% of my movies on the Media Server and use the Win7 Server for my HA and also some movies. I also use the Win7 Server for my BR ripping and transcoding. It works out nicely having 2 NUCs as when I am using Handbrake the CPU usage goes to 100%. When I rip my CPU usage is around 10% so I can watch a movie if I want to. I also record TV on the Win7 machine.
post #258 of 576
Having never tried OpenELEC, I'm considering it for my 2nd NUC build, this time a Celeron. My present NUC is an i3 with Windows 7. For OpenELEC, do I need a SSD drive, or just use a USB stick? If just latter, what size is needed? Thanks.
post #259 of 576
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brajesh View Post

Having never tried OpenELEC, I'm considering it for my 2nd NUC build, this time a Celeron. My present NUC is an i3 with Windows 7. For OpenELEC, do I need a SSD drive, or just use a USB stick? If just latter, what size is needed? Thanks.
You can use either. The USB stick is the quick, dirty, and cheap option since it works well and OpenELEC is very small and runs from RAM anyway. In that youtube video I linked in above the guy uses neither and boots OpenELEC over his network from his NAS(!) with no local storage at all except for RAM. A small 1GB or 2GB stick is big enough since OpenELEC is less than 200MB and it creates another 512MB space for itself when it starts up in live mode.

As a bonus, since it's a "live" bootable stick you can create one and try it out on your existing NUC by booting off the USB before committing. smile.gif
post #260 of 576
FWIW, I'm using OpenElec on my Acer Revo 1600. This is a nettop PC that had tremendous bang-for-the-buck value at the time: approx $200 for a nettop box with Intel Atom/NVIDIA ION, Windows XP, a hard drive (I forget how big), ethernet, 512MB or 1GB of RAM (I forget, and that's the one thing I upgraded), as well as a mouse and keyboard. Small and quite quiet as well (it does have a fan, but it rarely comes on).

I got this over a year ago (probably several), and initially tried XBMC on XP, then the Linux version, then tried installing Win 7. I was hoping to use it for Windows Media Center at one point, but the Atom CPU was not up to that task. I more recently installed OpenElec and it's great for my Blu-ray rips, using XBMC and PleXBMC.

As far as NFL GameCenter is concerned, if you have an iOS device, you can use their app for that and then use AirPlay to an ATV or possibly to your NUC running XBMC or Plex (I think they both support some manner of AirPlay but I haven't experimented with that).
post #261 of 576
Quote:
Originally Posted by assassin View Post

Around $500 including wireless and a mobile i5. It's about as big as a pack of cards or so. Makes a great tiny htpc if that's what you need for space saving, travel, etc

This seems low. How much is the NUC ? How much is the extras ?

What about a remote option? Or OS drive ? Ram ? CPU ? I'd guess it's going more than $500 but I admittedly am not the big into NUC so I don't know.

I am considering one for my parents next build.
post #262 of 576
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mfusick View Post

This seems low.
Exactly. That's what makes the NUC so attractive.

For example, I plan to run XBMC using OpenELEC. I ordered a Celeron NUC, 2GB Ram, a USB thumb drive for the OS, an MCE IR receiver for a Harmony remote, and a wireless keyboard/trackpad and the total bill is less than $240.

If you build a "fancy" version and want to run Windows 7/8, add ~$120 for the i3 NUC, ~$120 for a 120 GB mSATA SSD (or ~$30 for a 30GB mSATA) , additional memory, optional WiFi/bluetooth (~$30), and Windows 7/8. This assumes one does not need massive local storage and media is streamed from a separate server or the internet.

smile.gif
Edited by bluechunks - 8/4/13 at 6:15pm
post #263 of 576
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mfusick View Post

This seems low. How much is the NUC ? How much is the extras ?

What about a remote option? Or OS drive ? Ram ? CPU ? I'd guess it's going more than $500 but I admittedly am not the big into NUC so I don't know.

I am considering one for my parents next build.

I am not sure why you think its low. You really need to be more open minded sometimes. smile.gif

The Gigabyte Brix i3 is $299 link (the i5 is a little more) which includes the case, power supply, motherboard, CPU and wireless. Add your choice of RAM for $30-$60 (4 or 8GB depending on what you are doing --- for many 4GB is enough) and you have a fully capable HTPC for openelec as low as $330 (i3 with 4GB RAM) or $410 (i5 with 4GB RAM). I guess technically you need to add a flash drive if you don't have an old one laying around so figure another $5-$10.

The Intel Celeron NUC is $165 but does not come with a power supply (cord) or wireless. So figure those into the cost.

If you want to use Windows add a mSATA for $60-$100 depending on the size and Windows for $50-$130.

So you are looking at a range of $335 (i3, 4GB RAM, openelec on flash drive) to about $550 for the i5 variant. Then add a remote of your choice (I still like the lenovo for about $35) but in all honesty this would be required for any HTPC and not just the NUC.

Cliffnotes:

Low End build: $335
Higher End Build: $550
I did not configure the Celeron NUC but its even lower than the low end build.
post #264 of 576
Quote:
Originally Posted by srauly View Post

As far as NFL GameCenter is concerned, if you have an iOS device, you can use their app for that and then use AirPlay to an ATV or possibly to your NUC running XBMC or Plex (I think they both support some manner of AirPlay but I haven't experimented with that).

Interesting. But I have no iOS devices anymore (and hope to never again.) :P I'll see if there's a way to run Gamepass through XBMC but Openelec is starting to sound a little too limited for me. I wouldn't even be able to install "Unified Remote Server" or similar.
post #265 of 576
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mfusick View Post

This seems low. How much is the NUC ? How much is the extras ?

What about a remote option? Or OS drive ? Ram ? CPU ? I'd guess it's going more than $500 but I admittedly am not the big into NUC so I don't know.

I am considering one for my parents next build.

this is what I'm thinking about at so far:

CPU: Intel NUC i3 BOXDC3217IYE, JPY 28,434
SSD: Crucial 128GB CT128M4SSD3, JPY 11,600
RAM: Silicon Power 16GB 204Pin SO-DIMM DDR3-1600, JPY 11,480

OS: Windows 8, JPY 9,708 or OpenElec, Free
If OpenElec, then Browser: Kylo, Free

Total:
OpenElec: JPY 51,514 (roughly $520)
Windows 8: JPY 61,222 (roughly $620)
post #266 of 576
Quote:
Originally Posted by TeflonDog View Post

this is what I'm thinking about at so far:

CPU: Intel NUC i3 BOXDC3217IYE, JPY 28,434
SSD: Crucial 128GB CT128M4SSD3, JPY 11,600
RAM: Silicon Power 16GB 204Pin SO-DIMM DDR3-1600, JPY 11,480

OS: Windows 8, JPY 9,708 or OpenElec, Free
If OpenElec, then Browser: Kylo, Free

Total:
OpenElec: JPY 51,514 (roughly $520)
Windows 8: JPY 61,222 (roughly $620)
Looks like a great build, IMHO.

One observation, however, is that 120GB mSATA SSD and 16GB of RAM is enormous overkill for OpenELEC as OpenELEC will smoothly play full high Blu Ray backups with only 1GB of RAM and the Celeron CPU and no SSD at all (source). Thus, there's a larger potential difference in expense between the OpenELEC and Windows build. If you plan to run Windows, I say "go for it" and put a fast SSD and lots on memory in it like your proposed configuration. smile.gif
post #267 of 576
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluechunks View Post

Looks like a great build, IMHO.

One observation, however, is that 120GB mSATA SSD and 16GB of RAM is enormous overkill for OpenELEC as OpenELEC will smoothly play full high Blu Ray backups with only 1GB of RAM and the Celeron CPU and no SSD at all (source). Thus, there's a larger potential difference in expense between the OpenELEC and Windows build. If you plan to run Windows, I say "go for it" and put a fast SSD and lots on memory in it like your proposed configuration. smile.gif

Thanks. I agree that's overkill for OpenELEC... Playing with a number of configurations and re-checking checklists of what I need/want has been a very good exercise. Very glad I joined the AVS forums before running out to buy the first shiny box I saw!

My six-year-old HP Pavilion DV7 is also nearing its last breath (its been on life support for most of its years anyways). So I'm thinking a PC-replacement is nearing. However I do not want to get another laptop and was considering an All-In-One PC, but I really like these small form factors. (And i like being able to get inside without needing to remove 68 screws!)

And because NFL season is upon us, I need the power of Window for streaming GamePass first and foremost. So I'm thinking I will migrate my first build into a replacement PC role down the (short) road, then get a new box after that to be dedicated for media. (And that way I can also wait to see the real world specs of the PS4 and new Xbox.)

I devised two other configurations with OpenELEC and less RAM that are around $380 (Shuttle) and $320 (NUC). And both of those have i3 processors so the prices could be even lower. wink.gif
post #268 of 576
I'm looking to build an HTPC soon and the NUC was one of the options...

It needs to run 1080p over a projector smoothly at 120Hz, these will be movies streamed from my Plex media server through Win7/XBMC. Which option below would work best?
Quote:
NUC:
CPU/Motherboard/Case: Intel BOXDCCP847DYE
RAM: Team Group TSD34096M1600C11-E
OS HDD: Kingston Technology Corp. SMS200S3/60G

Total: $272.97
Quote:
Celeron build:
CPU: Celeron G1610
Motherboard: ASRock H77M-ITX
RAM: ADATA AX3U1600GB2G9-2G
OS HDD: ADATA ASP900S3-64GM-C
Case/PSU: Mini-Box M350 Enclosure with PicoPSU-80 and 60W adapter KIT

Total: $318.76

Or should I go for the i3 NUC?

Any help would be greatly appreciated!
post #269 of 576
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carisma View Post

Any help would be greatly appreciated!
FWIW, 120hz @ 1080p is not part of the HDMI 1.4a spec (it's 1.4b) and most current consumer electronic devices will not send, or accept, anything higher than 60Hz via HDMI (some computers and monitors will do 75Hz at certain resolutions).

Out of curiosity, what projector do you have that accepts a 120Hz input?

Or alternatively, if your projector refreshes at 120Hz but will only accept a 60Hz (max) signal simply send it the native film 24Hz (23.976Hz) and let the projector do the cadence for 120Hz. In that case, you might actually be better off getting a 'Haswell' based Celeron/i3/i5 as Intel has apparently fixed a minor issue with 23.976Hz output.
Edited by bluechunks - 8/6/13 at 2:19pm
post #270 of 576
Quote:
Originally Posted by bluechunks View Post

FWIW, 120hz @ 1080p is not part of the HDMI 1.4a spec (it's 1.4b) and most current consumer electronic devices will not send, or accept, anything higher than 60Hz via HDMI (some computers and monitors will do 75Hz at certain resolutions).

Out of curiosity, what projector do you have that accepts a 120Hz input?

Or alternatively, if your projector refreshes at 120Hz but will only accept a 60Hz (max) signal simply send it the native film 24Hz (23.976Hz) and let the projector do the cadence for 120Hz. In that case, you might actually be better off getting a 'Haswell' based Celeron/i3/i5 as Intel has apparently fixed a minor issue with 23.976Hz output.
Sorry...it was 60Hz. I was getting specs for a computer my friend wanted and he wanted it to handle 120Hz while I was typing up my post.

The only projectors I know that can do 1080p @ 120Hz are the Christie Digital's and I am not that rich haha.

I want 1080p@60Hz...again sorry for the confusion
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