or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › Display Devices › Plasma Flat Panel Displays › Official Panasonic S60 Series Discussion Thread
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Official Panasonic S60 Series Discussion Thread - Page 51

post #1501 of 6815
Pixel orbiter just isn't effective. Basically, instead of focused IR, with orbiter, you'd get blurry IR. But you'll still get IR. I would just turn it off and enjoy a crisp, full picture, and once a week run the horizontal scroll bar or get the Disney WoW disc and run pixel flipper over night after long sessions of static images.
post #1502 of 6815
Quote:
Originally Posted by Moonchilde View Post

Pixel orbiter just isn't effective. Basically, instead of focused IR, with orbiter, you'd get blurry IR. But you'll still get IR. I would just turn it off and enjoy a crisp, full picture, and once a week run the horizontal scroll bar or get the Disney WoW disc and run pixel flipper over night after long sessions of static images.

Moonchilde,

Thanks for input. Was going to ask if the picture was maybe a bit less sharp with orbiter on... likewise, overscan makes it look a little funky; can't get terribly specific, but something appears to be lost.
Edited by MountainMichael - 5/21/13 at 9:37pm
post #1503 of 6815
This is, I believe, my first post in this particular thread.

The last few months have been giving me quite the headache when it comes to picking a new 65" plasma TV for my home theater. After being burned with a 65V10 that suffered from the dreaded "black level rise" syndrome (and now looks like an LCD during dark scenes, although still great with everything else), I want to make sure I am making the right decision here.

I was dead set on the 65ST60 (I believe that at this point nobody denies it's ridiculous bang-for-the-buck performance), but after seeing the unit in person I'm afraid I was let down by its overall construction quality. My wife, in fact, simply hated the silver trim. I will say that the silver trim in itself is not a deal breaker to me, but nothing about the unit feels "solid", construction-wise, specially coming from my behemoth, 170 lbs. 65V10. The look of that TV was nothing fancy, but it worked beautifully. A simple piano black frame. Nothing more, nothing less. So the search/dilemma continues...

Then it was the VT60. Both the ST60 and VT60, in all honesty, look cheap, flimsy and plasticky to me, and I am not a big fan of the "V" shaped base nor the side HDMI inputs, either. But, again, it's not like one has any alternative at this point... However, what really broke the deal here were the numerous complaints about the fan noise in the VT60. I am VERY picky with that sort of thing, and, long story short, it is indeed a deal breaker for me. I don't care how great the blacks are. If I get a headache while using the TV, no excellent black level number is worth it.

It's now basically between the 65ST60 and the 65S60. I admit I had not even considered the S60 before, mostly because of Panasonic marketing jargon, which makes you believe that the S60 is miles below the rest of the 2013 line-up with things like those fancy "sub-drive" numbers, whatever they mean. Recent reviews of the S60, however, picked my interest and, in fact, this looks like the PERFECT TV for me! Tailor made, almost. Things that most people complain about in the case of the S60 are actually PERFECT in my case, and most welcome. I could afford the price difference between the S and the higher up models, but do not care one bit about 3D, gaming, apps, internet gizmos, Skype, wi-fi nor anything other than picture quality. That is all I want.

What I love about the S60 compared to the rest of the 2013 line-up:

- No frills. Emphasis on image quality.
- No 3D.
- Back HDMI inputs! (LOVE this) I hate the side inputs.
- 2 HDMI inputs are NOT a concern at all. One is all I really need, in fact, for my Oppo player. If I ever need more, I can always use the Oppo's dual HDMI inputs or my receiver's 4 other inputs. I doubt I'll ever bother, though. I don't play games. I have no cable box. I just watch movies on my TV.
- The ugly silver trim is less intrusive compared to the ST60s. My wife will appreciate that!
- NO NOISY FANS!
- No nonsense approach.
- I ONLY watch movies in a totally dark room. No windows. It's a dedicated room and my only source is the Oppo player. Again, no daytime TV, no games, no cable.
- INCREDIBLE PRICE! I can sell my 65V10 and get this new one for pocket change compared to what I'd have to spend on a VT60, for example.

Now, here's my question to all of you. From what I have read, the black level on the S60 is pretty much incredible, and not that different compared to last year's VT50 and now the ST60. Is still really the case?

Based on my personal needs and tastes described above, do you think this is the right TV for me, and do you think it will be a considerable upgrade from a 65V10 that suffered from the rise in black levels? Again, I could afford the extra $1K and go with the ST60 or even the VT60, but is it really worth it? Do I really want to give Panasonic a ton of my money when they already disappointed me BIG TIME with the 65V10's black level issue? Not to mention, there are so many new things around the corner... I know that VT quality will probably be half the price next year! Plus, I would never, ever use the 3D, etc. And I do not need the anti-reflective glass at all. Are the black/contrast levels between the S and ST really that similar under normal conditions?

Thanks in advance for your input.
Edited by Esteban Medaglia - 5/17/13 at 8:32pm
post #1504 of 6815
Quote:
Originally Posted by redhatyellow View Post

hey s60 owners, can someone comment or actually post a video of input lag with games?? im considering buying this TV! cool.gif
Here's a comment: no input lag. biggrin.gif
But really, it's very, very responsive. There's no point in showing anything else besides this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bSF9972uVTI.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moonchilde View Post

Pixel orbiter just isn't effective. Basically, instead of focused IR, with orbiter, you'd get blurry IR. But you'll still get IR. I would just turn it off and enjoy a crisp, full picture, and once a week run the horizontal scroll bar or get the Disney WoW disc and run pixel flipper over night after long sessions of static images.
I wish more people knew this. -.-

Quote:
Originally Posted by Esteban Medaglia View Post

Now, here's my question to all of you. From what I have read, the black level on the S60 is pretty much incredible, and not that different compared to last year's VT50 and now the ST60. Is still really the case?
Well, if you look at the CNET review geekboxes, yes, that is the case. They're off by a few thousandths of a cd/m^2. Even in the reviews, the stated differences can only be seen with the TVs side-by-side. The blacks on my S60 (fairchild's next-to-last calibration) are so black that when I accidentally had the colorspace set incorrectly throughout an entire movie (giving the black bars the trademark "LCD" washed-out gray) and fixed it during the credits, it looked like my panel essentially disappeared into my wall.
Quote:
Based on my personal needs and tastes described above, do you think this is the right TV for me, and do you think it will be a considerable upgrade from a 65V10 that suffered from the rise in black levels? Again, I could afford the extra $1K and go with the ST60 or even the VT60, but is it really worth it? Do I really want to give Panasonic a ton of my money when they already disappointed me BIG TIME with the 65V10's black level issue? Not to mention, there are so many new things around the corner... I know that VT quality will probably be half the price next year! Plus, I would never, ever use the 3D, etc. And I do not need the anti-reflective glass at all. Are the black/contrast levels between the S and ST really that similar under normal conditions?

Thanks in advance for your input.
Your listed pros sound like every other poster who is seriously considering the S60/S64. Go for it, you've done your homework. wink.gif
post #1505 of 6815
I have go agree with Matadurr. It's a good panel, so go for it. If I couldn't get my hands on a F8500 that was going to be my next choice.
post #1506 of 6815
Esteban Medaglia:

I've heard people say the 2013 plasmas look cheap, but I don't get it. To me, they look maybe "polished", but not offensively so. Professional is how I would describe the look though that may make it sound too clinical.

I
Edited by MountainMichael - 5/21/13 at 9:38pm
post #1507 of 6815
Quote:
Originally Posted by moshock View Post

I guess I'm confused why anyone would ever turn pixel oribter off. I always had it 'On' on my 60ST30, and now I always have it 'On' on my 65PS64. I never see it working, and it helps prevent IR/Burn-in. It exists and is 'On' by default for a reason. Why would you disable it?
Pixel Orbiter is an ineffectual image retention mechanism I believe Panasonic added to assuage needlessly worried Panasonic plasma owners. All it does is shifts the image around a few lines of resolution at a time, hardly enough to prevent image retention from even the smallest static logos. At most, all it will do is dull the peripheries of any static image.

I disable it because it's ineffective and I notice the shifted image when it's engaged. During TV viewing it wouldn't matter, at least in my case, because I have overscan enabled on my TV input to clear the noise/static on the edges of some channel feeds; therefore, I would never notice the shifts anyways. However, when I'm not using overscan during 1080p playback or 1080p input from my Xbox 360, I can readily see the lost lines of resolution with Pixel Orbiter engaged.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Esteban Medaglia View Post

Now, here's my question to all of you. From what I have read, the black level on the S60 is pretty much incredible, and not that different compared to last year's VT50 and now the ST60. Is still really the case?
Between the ST50 and ST60, according to David K. at CNET.
Edited by Yukon Trooper - 5/18/13 at 12:45am
post #1508 of 6815
I was reading through the S64 manual and it says "Do not use rechargeable (Ni-cd) batteries." in the remote. Why?
post #1509 of 6815
Thank you all for the feedback on the 65S60. A few more questions, if you don't mind:

- How's the audio/internal speakers quality? Decent enough not to force one to fire up the surround rig when watching films in mono?

- Regarding the "gradation steps", etc, is this really visible to the human eye from a distance of about 9 feet?

- Anybody have accurate black level readings on the 65S60 and the 65V10 (when working properly)? I could not find that many worthwhile S60 reviews. Regarding the V10, Cnet's review did not offer any numbers, even though it gave the V10 very high marks in the black level department (back then, of course). Should the out-the-box S60 be darker than the V10?

- Let's leave black levels aside for a second. My ISF-calibrated 65V10 looks great to me, EXCEPT, of course, during dark scenes, when everything falls apart. I do not know if back then (2009/10) Panasonic used the same marketing jargon and I do not know how many "steps of gradation" the V10 has. But for those that have experience with both models (the V10's and now the S60's), would this be an incredible, significant or barely noticeable improvement? Or would it be a step backwards, in fact?

Thanks again for your input!
post #1510 of 6815
Quote:
Originally Posted by HDTimeShifter View Post

I was reading through the S64 manual and it says "Do not use rechargeable (Ni-cd) batteries." in the remote. Why?
Interesting. It gives no reason? Personally I would disregard it because I cant imagine why not.
post #1511 of 6815
Esteban, things have changed a lot since the V10. You'll probably be happy with the S64.
post #1512 of 6815
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bond 007 View Post

Interesting. It gives no reason? Personally I would disregard it because I cant imagine why not.

This is the first user manual of any electronics that I've seen that says not to use rechargeable batteries.
I use rechargeable Ni-cd batteries in all my remotes that I use most. When they are low, the remote stops working and I just have to recharge.
I can't see any reason except that maybe you can't do anything with the TV while you are waiting for the batteries to recharge, but I figure I could always press the side power switch to turn off the TV to avoid IR when recharging.

Do you loose custom settings if there is a power outage?

Anybody know if the Denon 1910 receiver supports ARC (HDMI audio)? I don't have any optical digital audio cables and just use coax for all my D/A connections.
post #1513 of 6815
Quote:
Originally Posted by HDTimeShifter View Post

This is the first user manual of any electronics that I've seen that says not to use rechargeable batteries.
I use rechargeable Ni-cd batteries in all my remotes that I use most. When they are low, the remote stops working and I just have to recharge.
I can't see any reason except that maybe you can't do anything with the TV while you are waiting for the batteries to recharge, but I figure I could always press the side power switch to turn off the TV to avoid IR when recharging.
Perhaps it is because regular alkaline batteries have a very low self-discharge rate and rechargeable batteries have a much higher self-discharge rate. As a result, it will be a long time till alkalines need to be replaced while rechargeables will need to be recharged much more often. Frankly, the cost for replacing alkaline batteries in remotes over time is nil.
post #1514 of 6815
Esteban,

I agree with Moonchilde.

Regarding sound, in a nutshell: Yes, I think you would probably want to fire up your surround system even for a movie in monaural.
Edited by MountainMichael - 5/21/13 at 9:38pm
post #1515 of 6815
Quote:
Originally Posted by fairchild99 View Post

I only ever see ABL when messing around on my HTPC with the TV as the display device. And only when dealing with white webpages and tabbing around. You can see the ABL easily with a PC connected to it by opening say notepad (which is a full white window) then drag it around the screen while having a dark wallpaper/background. Also by opening notepad and then making it a tiny window, then dragging/enlarging it so it takes up more of the desktop. You can see fluctuations in the brightness and overall brightness of the desktop.

Again, this is going to happen with ALL modern plasma displays. Some are more aggressive than others, but it's just a fact of life atm. This is obviously not something you would be facing while using the TV for actual content (blu-ray's, TV, streaming video, gaming, etc etc)

I missed your post on this. That explains why I've never seen it.
Edited by MountainMichael - 5/21/13 at 9:38pm
post #1516 of 6815
Quote:
Originally Posted by davehancock View Post

Perhaps it is because regular alkaline batteries have a very low self-discharge rate and rechargeable batteries have a much higher self-discharge rate. As a result, it will be a long time till alkalines need to be replaced while rechargeables will need to be recharged much more often. Frankly, the cost for replacing alkaline batteries in remotes over time is nil.

True, I go years between alkaline battery replacements on remotes, even ones I use daily. However, the self-discharge issue has been largely solved, at least for certain NIMH cells. I use Rayovac "Hybrid" NIMH AAs in my camera, kitchen soap dispenser, etc, and those things last and last. Sanyo Eneloops are supposed to be good, too. The Rayovacs are a world of difference compared to the unreliable, quickly discharging Energizer NIMHs I had before them.
post #1517 of 6815
Quote:
Originally Posted by davehancock View Post

Perhaps it is because regular alkaline batteries have a very low self-discharge rate and rechargeable batteries have a much higher self-discharge rate. As a result, it will be a long time till alkalines need to be replaced while rechargeables will need to be recharged much more often. Frankly, the cost for replacing alkaline batteries in remotes over time is nil.

They could have recommended not to rather than said not to use recharchable batteries. My main all-purpose remote that I've been using to turn on my TV and control the HD DVR/cable box is the Comcast one and the rechargeables last for at least a couple of months at a time. Unless there is some danger from using rechargeables, I'll keep using them even though I have plenty of spare Alkalines in my refrigerator (makes them last longer in storage). Batteries are toxic and I'd prefer to throw away (recycle) less even if the cost is minimal.

To the guy who asked about firing up surround speakers, I don't see why not if you've got them. Relying on built-in crappy speakers would be like setting your TV to black and white when watching a modern movie or down-converting HD to SD or listening to stereo music with your amplifier set to mono. Any decent separate sound system should outperform the built-in speakers and sound much better even if it is mono content. I guess a better analogy would be watching old black and white films on an HDTV that does up-converting and/or line-doubling. I recently watched a Casablanca DVD (for the first time) on my 1080i CRT, and I'm sure it looked a hell of a lot better than if I had watched it on an old non-HD TV. I'm pretty sure it had a mono-track, but I'm sure it sound a lot better through my 4 full-range front and surrounds speaker system than through the CRT's front facing side speakers. I need to get a sub and center channel someday, but they all recommend matching center and front speakers and I don't want to get rid of my audiophile quality full-range speakers or spend the money to replace them.
post #1518 of 6815
Quote:
Originally Posted by sawfish View Post

True, I go years between alkaline battery replacements on remotes, even ones I use daily. However, the self-discharge issue has been largely solved, at least for certain NIMH cells. I use Rayovac "Hybrid" NIMH AAs in my camera, kitchen soap dispenser, etc, and those things last and last. Sanyo Eneloops are supposed to be good, too. The Rayovacs are a world of difference compared to the unreliable, quickly discharging Energizer NIMHs I had before them.

Oh, I didn't notice that my rechargeable AA and AAA batteries are actually NiMH, not Ni-cd. So I guess NIMH is not a problem. I only distinguish between Ni v. lithium battery types.

My old digital camera used NiMH AA batteries and they didn't last worth a crap (maybe a couple of hours snapping sightseeing photos on vacation), so I had accumulated about 10 spare NIMH batteries over time and after the camera died, use them in all my remotes. My new camera uses a custom lithium battery which costs $32 but lasts close to 8 hours. The AA NiMH batteries last for at least a couple of months on my most used remotes. For the remotes and low-power devices like clocks that I don't have rechargeable batteries for, I try to use up the few non-alkaline batteries I still have (usually come from electronics purchases like the S64). I save my alkalines for hi-power devices like flashlights.
post #1519 of 6815
Quote:
Originally Posted by HDTimeShifter View Post

My old digital camera used NiMH AA batteries and they didn't last worth a crap (maybe a couple of hours snapping sightseeing photos on vacation), so I had accumulated about 10 spare NIMH batteries over time and after the camera died, use them in all my remotes. My new camera uses a custom lithium battery which costs $32 but lasts close to 8 hours. The AA NiMH batteries last for at least a couple of months on my most used remotes. For the remotes and low-power devices like clocks that I don't have rechargeable batteries for, I try to use up the few non-alkaline batteries I still have (usually come from electronics purchases like the S64). I save my alkalines for hi-power devices like flashlights.

Not all NIMHs are created equal. The Rayovac Hybrids are good for hundreds of pictures in my Canon A610, and I change them maybe twice a year. The Energizer NIMHs I had before them were complete junk, dying quickly in use and a little more slowly when sitting around doing nothing. If you're getting months of use out of your remotes, that's not bad.
post #1520 of 6815
Quote:
Originally Posted by sawfish View Post

Not all NIMHs are created equal. The Rayovac Hybrids are good for hundreds of pictures in my Canon A610, and I change them maybe twice a year. The Energizer NIMHs I had before them were complete junk, dying quickly in use and a little more slowly when sitting around doing nothing. If you're getting months of use out of your remotes, that's not bad.

The batteries in my old Kodak camera went from 2-4 hours (depending on how frequently I snapped) to dying almost right away. I tried swapping with another brand and the low power light kept coming on almost right away and it turned off as well, so I figured the camera was shot and bought a new camera. The batteries do work fine in my remotes. NiMH AA batteries are fine - AAA don't last very long, however. A single AAA NiMH in a desk clock seems to last only a month or so, and the ones in an LED mini-flashlight need to be recharged fairly frequently. Those two applications probably aren't optimal since the clock is a continuous drain, and flashlights are pretty high-power drain. Remotes, on the other hand require from infrequent to moderate frequency power - I pretty much only use my A/V receiver to power it on/off and occasionally change volume; the DVR/cable box remote is used to power on/off the DVR, change channels, get program info and menu items, and play/FF/RW; and my BluRay player (remote) is not used very often. Oh, I found out NiMH batteries vary in their power level, and started buying the highest level I could find 2500 NiMH for that old camera and now use the highest power ones in the remotes I use most.
post #1521 of 6815
Quote:
Originally Posted by Esteban Medaglia View Post

Thank you all for the feedback on the 65S60. A few more questions, if you don't mind:

- How's the audio/internal speakers quality? Decent enough not to force one to fire up the surround rig when watching films in mono?

- Regarding the "gradation steps", etc, is this really visible to the human eye from a distance of about 9 feet?

- Anybody have accurate black level readings on the 65S60 and the 65V10 (when working properly)? I could not find that many worthwhile S60 reviews. Regarding the V10, Cnet's review did not offer any numbers, even though it gave the V10 very high marks in the black level department (back then, of course). Should the out-the-box S60 be darker than the V10?

- Let's leave black levels aside for a second. My ISF-calibrated 65V10 looks great to me, EXCEPT, of course, during dark scenes, when everything falls apart. I do not know if back then (2009/10) Panasonic used the same marketing jargon and I do not know how many "steps of gradation" the V10 has. But for those that have experience with both models (the V10's and now the S60's), would this be an incredible, significant or barely noticeable improvement? Or would it be a step backwards, in fact?

Thanks again for your input!
The 65S0 handily outperforms the V10, mainly due to the much lower black level. It will be a significant to incredible upgrade, if you appreciate your black levels.
post #1522 of 6815
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yukon Trooper View Post

Pixel Orbiter is an ineffectual image retention mechanism I believe Panasonic added to assuage needlessly worried Panasonic plasma owners. All it does is shifts the image around a few lines of resolution at a time, hardly enough to prevent image retention from even the smallest static logos. At most, all it will do is dull the peripheries of any static image.

I disable it because it's ineffective and I notice the shifted image when it's engaged. During TV viewing it wouldn't matter, at least in my case, because I have overscan enabled on my TV input to clear the noise/static on the edges of some channel feeds; therefore, I would never notice the shifts anyways. However, when I'm not using overscan during 1080p playback or 1080p input from my Xbox 360, I can readily see the lost lines of resolution with Pixel Orbiter engaged.

I recently purchased a 42S60 for our bedroom (Replacing a great Sony KD-34XBR800) and interrupted the 100 hr burn-in to run some tests relating to the screen format and the impact of the orbiter. I used special test patterns at 1080i from my Accupel signal generator.

The first set of patterns show the orbiter at work. The pattern has a series of lines forming a multi-line box around the screen. These pictures show just the upper left corner. Note that the orbiter shifts the complete picture horizontally (but not vertically) one pixel at a time. It only shifts to three positions (and so really doesn't do much good as Yukon Trooper points out). In the case here, it actually shifts the image up to two pixels off screen.

Position 1 (two left pixels cut off)

Position 2 (one left pixel cut off)

Position 3 (all pixels shown)


Regarding Screen Format & Overscan:

The Accupel has a test pattern with vertical lines one pixel wide (and one pixel spaces).

This is what it looks like (Format at FULL, Overscan OFF


Turn Overscan ON and you get this:


Set the Format to JUST (Overscan is Off) and you get this:


The vertical bars are formed by the process of spreading an individual pixel across other pixels. While few "real images" will have a similar pattern, there is a slight degradation of the image when you do not have pixel matching.

When doing a calibration, I typically show this pattern to the customer and encourage the use of the 1:1 pixel matching setting (what it is called varies with different sets). Edge noise is usually only found in SD up-conversions, so most customers today aren't encountering the noise.
post #1523 of 6815
Quote:
Originally Posted by davehancock View Post

I recently purchased a 42S60 for our bedroom (Replacing a great Sony KD-34XBR800) and interrupted the 100 hr burn-in to run some tests relating to the screen format and the impact of the orbiter.
When doing a calibration, I typically show this pattern to the customer and encourage the use of the 1:1 pixel matching setting (what it is called varies with different sets). Edge noise is usually only found in SD up-conversions, so most customers today aren't encountering the noise.
Good stuff. Thanks. smile.gif
post #1524 of 6815
I have read every page of this thread. I've been following it since it was started. It's going to be a few months before I can buy the 65S60/65S64 (IF the S64 is still available when it get back to the states, that's what I'll be picking up) but I have one question that I have not seen anyone address. I want to use my Nexus 7 as a universal remote for everything in my new home theater, can someone comment on how useful the Android app (I think its called Remote 2 in the app store) is? I've read through the comments on the app itself, and that was a waste of time. Y'all are obviously a much better resource. I want to know, honestly, if it can fully replace the included remote. Thanks in advance.
post #1525 of 6815
Quote:
Originally Posted by davehancock View Post

Regarding Screen Format & Overscan:

The Accupel has a test pattern with vertical lines one pixel wide (and one pixel spaces).

This is what it looks like (Format at FULL, Overscan OFF


Turn Overscan ON and you get this:


Set the Format to JUST (Overscan is Off) and you get this:


The vertical bars are formed by the process of spreading an individual pixel across other pixels. While few "real images" will have a similar pattern, there is a slight degradation of the image when you do not have pixel matching.

When doing a calibration, I typically show this pattern to the customer and encourage the use of the 1:1 pixel matching setting (what it is called varies with different sets).

What is Format JUST? I assume Format Full is what you normally want.
post #1526 of 6815
Quote:
Originally Posted by HDTimeShifter View Post

What is Format JUST? I assume Format Full is what you normally want.
Yes, Full is 1:1. I dont know the ratio for Just but it stretches it horizontally.
post #1527 of 6815
is there ANY advantage the s60 has over the s64 in a dark room? i know the filter on the s64 helps with reflections... but if reflections aren't an issue for me... should i get the s60 instead? biggrin.gif
post #1528 of 6815
Hi: I'm wondering how much of an upgrade would a 50S60 be over a 50PX80U which is an '08 model and 720P (my current T.V). The reason I'm thinking of switching is the power consumption(in my current apt. I have to run it on the same circuit 15 amp fuse to boot as my A/C, can't move either due to room arrangement) difference and the heat generated by my current 50" vs. a new one. Finally how close does the S60 come to a ST60 all things being equal? Thanks!!
post #1529 of 6815
Quote:
Originally Posted by redhatyellow View Post

is there ANY advantage the s60 has over the s64 in a dark room? i know the filter on the s64 helps with reflections... but if reflections aren't an issue for me... should i get the s60 instead? biggrin.gif
If reflections aren't an issue, the only reason you would want the S64 is if you are going for the 65 inch screen size. The 65S64 is cheaper than the 65S60.
post #1530 of 6815
Quote:
Originally Posted by redhatyellow View Post

is there ANY advantage the s60 has over the s64 in a dark room? i know the filter on the s64 helps with reflections... but if reflections aren't an issue for me... should i get the s60 instead? biggrin.gif

Yes, definitely. The filter reduces image brightness and 'pop'. You also get better shadow detail without an AR filter. Overall the image is just clearer and better.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Plasma Flat Panel Displays
AVS › AVS Forum › Display Devices › Plasma Flat Panel Displays › Official Panasonic S60 Series Discussion Thread