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Receiver to speak $ ratio quesion

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 
Ok I know they say you should spend about 1/3 of the money on the receiver versus what you spend on the speakers. Or even half I have heard as well. But here is the questions. Lets say you are running a pair of speakers that cost 1000 each, for a total of 2000 dollars, so does that mean a 1000 receiver? And then what if you are running 4, 500 dollars speakers would you base you receiver money of the 500 each price or the 2000 total price that you paid? That is what I have not seen in the explanation.
post #2 of 4
Get a receiver that does what you need it to do. The speaker:receiver ratios you see are hardly that specific. They are designed to emphasize that speakers have a lot more to do with audio quality than AVRs. If you have excellent, expensive speakers, that doesn't mean you need to overspend on an AVR just to hit a certain ratio. Besides, a lot of the expense of receivers these days is related to features having nothing to do with sound quality.
post #3 of 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by metalguy View Post

Ok I know they say you should spend about 1/3 of the money on the receiver versus what you spend on the speakers. Or even half I have heard as well. But here is the questions. Lets say you are running a pair of speakers that cost 1000 each, for a total of 2000 dollars, so does that mean a 1000 receiver? And then what if you are running 4, 500 dollars speakers would you base you receiver money of the 500 each price or the 2000 total price that you paid? That is what I have not seen in the explanation.

All such pricing schemes fail because they are based on the idea that performance and cost have a consistent probably even linear relationship. So many failures of that idea seem to exist.

Right now I look at receiver pricing and I see many exceptions to much of a logical pattern.

Besides there is more to a system than the AVR and the speakers. Room setup and tuning are huge in terms of improving sound quality.
post #4 of 4
1) Dont worry about power of the receiver unless you need a 4 ohm receiver. The difference between how loud a speaker gets at 80 wpc vs 140 wpc is marginal.

2) Make sure you are buying the features you need and a quality brand. The biggest feature that most people need is good room correction. So put that on your list. Research room correction technologies and figure it out.

Bad speakers = bad no matter what is driving them.
Good speakers can sound bad with a really bad source but any named brand receiver is more alike than different. Sony and a few other brands are generally considered subpar though.

Don't forget that every 3-5 years you will probably need a new receiver (technology changes, decoding, etc). You may never "need" a new set of speakers again.

A big rough rule of thumb is if your receiver = 1/3 the cost of your 5.1 system...think really hard about it. If it = 15-20% ...I would say your in the right "zone". If it = less...you may want to take a hard look as well.

That being said...there is no right answer.
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