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Need help with VERY OLD Speakers!

post #1 of 7
Thread Starter 
Hi everyone, i've been recently handed down (Two) Sony Speaker System Model No. SS-D302. I've connected them to my parent's old cd/cassette music system and they work fine (yay).

The only problem is that they have a red/black wire slot (Bi-wire?? - Not sure) which i literally have to shove-in wires to connect it to the old cd/cassette music system.
Is it possible to install some sort of USB or 3.5mm Stereo headphone jack or chord? If so, how?

Thanks for your attention!
Any tips, suggestions would be greatly appreciated!
Edited by Wisoonsta - 3/3/13 at 1:47am
post #2 of 7
those sound like spring clips to me. It is how it used to be done. There is nothing inherently 'wrong' with that method, it's just yesterday's way of doing it. As long as you make a good connection with bare wire inserted into them, the speakers don't care. It's not an inferior method of connection, by any means, it's just how speakers were connected, for many years. More 'modern' speakers just don't use that method of connection anymore.

If the speakers use that, then no, there is no effective way of 'converting' them to use USB or a 3.5 mm connection. That would be relevant to your AVR's connections, not the speakers themselves . If that is the only way to connect the speakers, then you have to connect bare wires into those clips. Period. You don't have an 'inferior' connection doing it this way... it just doesn't look the same as 'modern' speakers' connections. You will not sacrifice anything as far as sound quality is concerned. The speaker itself just doesn't have 'newer' binding posts.

Even 'newer' binding posts allow the use of a 'bare wire' connection. It's just a different way of making the connection. The 'spring clips' are just an 'older' way of making the connection.

As long as the speakers themselves are still functional, it doesn't make a difference if you use a different cable, or connection method. The speakers will still function the same.

You can still purchase speaker wire terminations that "connect' to those spring clips without using bare wire, but like banana plugs, they just make the ends of the speaker wire easier to connect, but don't affect the actual transmission of the signal, or the performance of the speaker themselves. smile.gif They're called the 'pin screw' or 'pin crimp' type, depending on how you want to connect them to your speaker wires.
, and they're what you'd want to look for, Check Monoprice. like these:

http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=104&cp_id=10401&cs_id=1040115&p_id=5975&seq=1&format=2

or these :

http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=104&cp_id=10401&cs_id=1040115&p_id=5973&seq=1&format=2

Hope that makes sense...
Joseph
post #3 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wisoonsta View Post

The only problem is that they have a red/black wire slot (Bi-wire?? - Not sure)

It has nothing to do with what's known in the audio world as bi-wiring, it's just a type of terminal (basic electrical connector) that takes raw wire from a two-conductor cable (you have to match red with red and black with black from each set of terminals).
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wisoonsta View Post

which i literally have to shove-in wires to connect it to the old cd/cassette music system.

I may be mistaken, and if that's the case then I apologize ahead of time, but I'll assume that you're only familiar with speakers that connect through things like 3.5mm headphone jacks. Most "hi-fi" home audio speakers, like the ones you're inquiring about, are connected with raw wires shoved into terminals, even today. You either shove two wires (usually) into a "spring clip" or "binding post" and then make sure they're secure, or you can make or buy cables terminated with metal pins or "banana plugs" that simplify connecting and disconnecting from these terminals, respectively. The speakers need to be electrically powered somehow (right?), and these cables (which often resemble other power cables) are needed to power the speakers with the audio signal (all at once--the signal actually provides the power). A certain type of device is required to amplify a signal enough to power the speakers, and naturally they're called amplifiers.

If I'm not mistaken, the speakers that you're accustomed to generally have another power source, such as a power cable (or cord) that plugs into an electrical outlet, or maybe even batteries. Such speakers are either part of a system that includes amplifiers or have amplifiers built right into them, which you can tell because they plug into an outlet and receive the audio signal separately from a 3.5mm cable (TRS), RCA stereo cables, or even something like USB. The Sony SS-D302 is a completely different--but still extremely common--type of speaker that needs a separate amplifier (often built into a multifunctional unit called a receiver or one like your parents' old music system) to work.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wisoonsta View Post

Is it possible to install some sort of USB or 3.5mm Stereo headphone jack or chord? If so, how?

These speakers can't power themselves without an amplifier (please don't plug them into an electrical outlet! eek.gifwink.gif), so you'd have to install one, like this:
http://www.parts-express.com/pdf/ThePerfectlyPortableB652.pdf

Or you could partner them with a small amplifier if you don't already have one that can take a signal from an outside source (e.g. computer, MP3 player), such as the following:
http://www.amazon.com/LP-2020A-Lepai-Tripath-Class-T-Amplifier/dp/B0049P6OTI

Check out the picture of the rear panel--there are two sets of spring clips to connect to your speakers and a couple of jacks for the audio signal (3.5mm and RCA). And it plugs into the wall for power.
post #4 of 7
Thread Starter 
Hi! Thankyou for your fast reply! Yep, i'll be sure to buy those pin screws as they make everything easier.

Just another question; how do i actually connect it to my computer?

On one end of the speaker cable i'd attach 2 Pin-Screw-Type Banana Plugs, but what do i attach on the other end?

Thanks again!
post #5 of 7
Thread Starter 
Thankyou for your reply as well!

I'm very inexperienced in audio systems and the such. Right now i'm running a Logitech Speaker System Z323 which is very much 'Plug-In-And-Go'.

I have 2 of the Sony SS-D302 amplifiers so i figure i'd buy this:

http://www.amazon.com/LP-2020A-Lepai-Tripath-Class-T-Amplifier/dp/B0049P6OTI

As well as 4 pairs of:

http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=104&cp_id=10401&cs_id=1040115&p_id=5975&seq=1&format=2

Sorry to use up more of your time, but how do i connect the Lepai Tripath LP-2020A mini amp, to my computer?

Also, Is it possible to connect both Sony Speakers to my current existing setup (Logitech Speaker System Z323) and make them run alongside?

Thankyou for your attention.
post #6 of 7
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wisoonsta View Post

I have 2 of the Sony SS-D302 amplifiers so i figure i'd buy this:

These are the speakers. wink.gif

That's what you need. This one powers a pair of speakers. Note that it'll get the speakers fairly loud for close-up listening, like for a desktop computer, but it's a very small amp and has its limits. If you wish to listen to music at a distance away from the speaker, then you may want to consider a larger, more powerful amp.

You don't really need these unless you plan to disconnect and reconnect your speakers and amplifier frequently, though.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wisoonsta View Post

Sorry to use up more of your time, but how do i connect the Lepai Tripath LP-2020A mini amp, to my computer?

You can use a 3.5mm stereo headphone cable--get one with two "male" plugs on either end.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wisoonsta View Post

Also, Is it possible to connect both Sony Speakers to my current existing setup (Logitech Speaker System Z323) and make them run alongside?

I bet that you could replace two of the Logitech speakers with the Sonys somehow, but then it would be a mismatched system. How to do this depends on how the Logitech's speakers are connected. In this case, you would be using the amplifiers built into the Logitech system.
post #7 of 7
Thread Starter 
Thankyou! I think i'm set!
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