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Questions on Flat LED Hz rates?

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
Hello all.

First to mention I hope I'm in the right section but if not please feel free to move, as well for asking probably what is a real been discussed and noob question, but have I think some specific questions and I just don't know.

Been looking at some LED TV's in the 46" range and am seeing what amounts to the same TV but one with 60Hz or 120Hz.

Plan very much to use this TV to display my PC via a second HDMI output from my video card, which I assume means my PC will probably treat it like a second monitor....all to display my computer onto it for my flight simulators.

Currently am still using CRT and with no PC believe it or not, so could say while this is not the only one, is a big reason I'm going with a flat and this size.

So with the first question, know the Hz rate on my PC can make a dif on the load it can put on it to run a simulator, so is this the same for a Flat?

Second, typically I am running my PC screen at 72mHz and my eyes really like that, so does this mean if I get a 60mHz Flat I won't be able to do that and 60 will be my limit?

Lastly and I also know this might be tough to answer but if I had a 120 TV, is it possible that will be an option from my video card?

Basically in the end as I mentioned, there seems to be a trend now of the Hz being the big factor on difference of the cost, again looking at ones that are essentially the same...but are either 60Hz or 120Hz and its like a 200-300 dif in price for what seems like in all other the same TV. Kinda hoping I could go with the 60Hz but just don't want to make the wrong purchase.

Thanks for any help.
Edited by WBFAir - 3/4/13 at 8:35am
post #2 of 8
A 60Hz LCD/LED TV always refreshes its screen at 60fps even it the TV is being sent a slower fps rate. A 120 HzLCD/LED always refreshes at 120 fps but does not accept a signal greater the 60fps. 72 Hz was possible on CRT tvs to reduce flicker of PC application programs. The output frame rate of most flight simulator is highly dependent on the amount of landscape and other video images being displayed and may get as low 20-30 fps and when this occurs the TV just displays some images more once per second.
post #3 of 8
video cards can generally refresh two montors at different rates, where required. So you can still likely refresh your current monitor @ 72 and a new one @ 60.
If you don't already know about it, you may want to check these forums for discussions on video lag. I'm not a gamer, but a lot of them have problems with it.
Be aware that a lot of advertising now implies refresh rates that are basically a lie. i.e. see this
post #4 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by walford View Post

A 60Hz LCD/LED TV always refreshes its screen at 60fps even it the TV is being sent a slower fps rate. A 120 HzLCD/LED always refreshes at 120 fps but does not accept a signal greater the 60fps. 72 Hz was possible on CRT tvs to reduce flicker of PC application programs
Hello walford and thanks for the reply. So wow, if understand this right, even if I got a 120 and tried sending it 72 or higher, the 120 is never going to do anything more them 60. So really kinda makes me spending the extra in regards to this one concern of mine pretty pointless.

If I'm correct, thanks for the info as I didn't know this.
post #5 of 8
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sstephen View Post

video cards can generally refresh two montors at different rates, where required. So you can still likely refresh your current monitor @ 72 and a new one @ 60.
If you don't already know about it, you may want to check these forums for discussions on video lag. I'm not a gamer, but a lot of them have problems with it.
Be aware that a lot of advertising now implies refresh rates that are basically a lie. i.e. see this
Thanks for the reply sstephen, just to mention, yeah was thinking about lag and from a variety of other sources an figured I'd have to deal with them in what every way I would. But, just wanted to look at the refresh rates thing to know if it was one that I should consider. As well too, yeah I read about stuff about how the rates as a whole really doesn't mean much, but just wondered if it did for my situation.

All in all it sounds like for what I'm doing the 120 over the 60 is just a waist of money.

As well too is how it kinda seems like more of the 60's are starting to go out of shelf stock over the 120's, so that kinda was another thing as I was wondering about was should I get something now, or wait as I kinda really don't have the money so was hoping to wait for a few more months. But basically as the 120's are more, if I wait at least for that time frame, will have to end up spending more later and for no reason, so would be better to get a 60 now before their gone.

Well thanks a lot for all the help guys.
Edited by WBFAir - 3/5/13 at 5:11am
post #6 of 8
For gamming or for your flight simulator you would not want to interpret between 2 60Hz frames to reduce blur on a 120 Hz set since that processing required would just cause more lag.
post #7 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by walford View Post

For gamming or for your flight simulator you would not want to interpret between 2 60Hz frames to reduce blur on a 120 Hz set since that processing required would just cause more lag.
There are several ways to reduce or eliminate motion blur for fast-action video gaming, at least with a computer connected to a display:

1. Use a Sony that has a NON-interpolating "Motionflow Impulse" mode. (e.g. Sony HX950)
This is a special motionflow mode that does NOT use interpolation. It only uses backlight strobing to improve motion quality (ala CRT-style flicker). Thus, it is more videogame-friendly than other motionflow modes. Alas, there's some input lag, but not as terrible as interpolation. Some people don't like its 60 Hz flicker, but it helps high-speed video game motion (e.g. FPS shooters)

2. HDTV Refresh Rate Overclocking -- Input 120 Hz From a Computer Into HDTV
You need an active 3D TV. There's a method of forcing 1280x720p 120Hz into a HDTV, even though most HDTV's do not support a 120 Hz signal. This is because most 3D TV's supports 720p@60Hz 3D (Add left/right eyes together = 60Hz+60Hz = 120Hz 2D)

3. Alternatively, switch to a LightBoost computer monitor that has zero motion blur. They have rave reviews for gaming in media coverage
Most of these LightBoost LCD's are only computer-monitor sized, but have 85% to 92% less motion blur than a typical 60 Hz LCD

4. Switch to a plasma or CRT
They have their own pros for video gaming.

On the other hand, flight simulators are usually slow-moving video games, so motion blur elimination is not as important. It is possible to be very happy with a plain 60 Hz LCD for flight simulators. So, I would advise, that 120 Hz does not really matter for flight simulators. Just for fast-action games -- first person shooters.
Edited by Mark Rejhon - 3/7/13 at 5:03pm
post #8 of 8
Thread Starter 
Hey guys quick question and sorry if it kinda also means I didn't fully understand some of the responses above, but the 120Hz version of the two sets I'm looking at seems to often be going on sale for just about as much as the 60Hz one.

Is there any reason for the things I'm looking for that I wouldn't want to get the 120 over the 60?

Kinda is too that they seem to keep the 120 in stock at the stores more, so when the sale comes, I can just grab it.

The 60 seems that I can have it shipped to the store an then pick up, so kinda feel like I have to make the choice and then stick with it if go with that one.

Thanks for any help.
Edited by WBFAir - 3/9/13 at 10:52am
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