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*Official* Roku 3 Streaming Player Thread - Page 26

post #751 of 1724
wireless?

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post #752 of 1724
Yepp
post #753 of 1724
get wired
post #754 of 1724
I've found that it is always hit or miss with Netflix even on a wired connection.
post #755 of 1724
Agreed on Netflix stability. While mine is usually fine, it is less stable when compared to my other Roku apps.
post #756 of 1724
Get wired is ridiculous. The fact is streaming at times is unreliable but neither roku or the provider wants to own up. My dad had a 20mbps Comcast connection and he has seen the same issue with Netflix last week. Here is what happened yesterday:

Episode 6 of The Lake looked like SD about the whole hour. Episode 7 looked full HD the a good bit of the episode but still had some transitions to poor quality. Then I watched an episode of Arrow on Amazon in HD and it was fine. Its not WiFi, its Netflix or unreliability of the ROKU 3 WIFI.
post #757 of 1724
Could be a number of factors. Could be your internal wireless. All depends on the signal strength at the roku and if there was any interference with the signal. I've had that happen. Only way to test that is via a wired connection. Wireless is just unreliable in my experience. Signal strength and speed fluctuate too much. I've run two wireless routers and used wifi analyzer to monitor the changes in the signal and have seen this first hand. Personally with streaming online video I wouldn't bother with anything other than 802.11n or the newer 802.11ac

Could be comcast. It's not unusual to have internet speeds fluctuate. Especially with comcast. You won't get the advertised speed 100% of the time.

I think the culprit is most likely netflix. I've experienced the same thing. And i'm running a wired connection and i'm on FIOS. I've yet to find an online streaming service that actually delivers 1080p. Even netflix's superHD clearly is not. I'm also shocked by the number of videos that aren't even in 5.1, same goes for hulu except their HD looks even worse.
The best quality i've found so far has been on amazon prime streaming. The video is the closest to 1080 that i've seen and more of their content is 5.1

Makes cutting the cord difficult. All this online streaming makes me feel like we're moving backwards in terms of quality and selection.
post #758 of 1724
Quote:
Originally Posted by archer75 View Post

Wireless is just unreliable in my experience. Signal strength and speed fluctuate too much. I've run two wireless routers and used wifi analyzer to monitor the changes in the signal and have seen this first hand.

Of course. "Get wired is ridiculous" is ridiculous and not worth my time.

If you want to learn why Netflix streaming is the best in the business Google "Hadoop Netfix streaming".
post #759 of 1724
Wired is ridiculous because you shouldn't have to. Here we are getting streaming devices shoved down our throats, but yet the answer is don't use WiFi and run more cable.

If you read Gary you'd note wired folks are having thesame issue . I'll tell you what is not worth my time, the same generic answer of use wired when WiFi is not giving the expected results. Many many times I've run the stupid cable from the router to a bluray player or older roku player and its done nothing to help. I can sit my laptop on the ht stand and get the same results as I'd its connected directly to the router. So don't waste my time acting like running an Ethernet cable will fix the issue. I'm gonna go back tothe roku 2 because I never had these issues before.
post #760 of 1724
I agree I run my Roku 3 wired and I had problems last night. I watched Star Trek TNG which I know is not in HD yet the LED lights blinked rapidly through the entire program. I then watched Transformers Prime which is a HD program and it sure did not look sharp to me. After about six minutes of constant LED blinking I said screw this and turned on my PS3 and in about 30 seconds it ramped up to 1080 stayed there and was night and day compared to the Roku.

The Roku 3 streams Amazon great. Starts out at high quality but Netflix it is a hit and miss usually starting out at really bad quality then ramping up to great quality most if the time but then sometimes it can't play in HD.
post #761 of 1724
Quote:
Originally Posted by gadgtfreek View Post

Wired is ridiculous because you shouldn't have to. Here we are getting streaming devices shoved down our throats, but yet the answer is don't use WiFi and run more cable.

If you read Gary you'd note wired folks are having thesame issue . I'll tell you what is not worth my time, the same generic answer of use wired when WiFi is not giving the expected results. Many many times I've run the stupid cable from the router to a bluray player or older roku player and its done nothing to help. I can sit my laptop on the ht stand and get the same results as I'd its connected directly to the router. So don't waste my time acting like running an Ethernet cable will fix the issue. I'm gonna go back tothe roku 2 because I never had these issues before.

You've gotta let the anger go man, it's not good for you! You did say that running a cable to a bluray player or older roku did nothing to help and you get the same results on your laptop. But then said you're going back to an older roku because it never had these issues. So which is it?

I said it's a possible issue. And when troubleshooting it's something easy to test. The other can be your ISP. And lastly I said it is likely netflix's fault. If it's only happening on the roku then i'd say it's the netflix app that has a problem. But it's happening on all your devices as you stated so i'd say it's an issue with the netflix site itself.

They are certainly NOT the best in the business. They have a better interface than amazon but amazon's quality is noticeably better.

You are correct when you said you shouldn't have to go to wired to get quality. And i'd agree, you shouldn't. But that's the state of wireless today. It shouldn't have speeds/signal strength that are inconsistent from one moment to the next. But it does.

Even owners of the new chromecast have had issues if their signal strength in their homes isn't quite good enough at the location of the chromecast. Stuttering and such.
post #762 of 1724
Blaming the ISP and interference is a bunch of hogwash. That is the same line outsource tech support will tell you. It is the crappy Netflix channel for the Roku simple since the PS3 has no problems playing those same titles then it can't be the ISP.

Don't get me wrong the Roku is a great device but compared to other channels the Netflix channel is rubbish. It looks like it was created last decade butt ugly and really dated. It can't handle congestion unlike the PS3 app which is why streaming quality suffers. Compared to the Amazon channel it is rubbish.
post #763 of 1724
Quote:
Originally Posted by reddice View Post

Blaming the ISP and interference is a bunch of hogwash. That is the same line outsource tech support will tell you.

It's not hogwash at all. These are real issues that can indeed have an affect. I've seen it time and time again over the years. And it's easy enough for a person to test over a period of time and see for yourself. But like I also said, I agree that it's the netflix app that is the culprit.
post #764 of 1724
Using the Roku 3, in which audio format do you get Amazon Prime Instant Streaming?
post #765 of 1724
I think Amazon uses WMA which the Roku does not support.
post #766 of 1724
In my experience with two Roku2 boxes and one Roku3 box. Whether I'm using the wired connection or wireless connection the experience has been identical. No problems with Netflix or other straming services. Netflix quickly goes up to 1080P streams and stay there. Whether on wireless or a wired connection.
post #767 of 1724
I do agree that sometimes the ISP is at fault but I do rule it out for me when the Roku streams Netflix like crap I try the PS3 and if I have no problems then I know it is not the ISP but the crappy Roku channel.
Edited by reddice - 7/29/13 at 11:15am
post #768 of 1724
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimP View Post

Using the Roku 3, in which audio format do you get Amazon Prime Instant Streaming?

Dolby Digital for the titles that support it. It's not the Dolby Digital Plus version that Netflix uses. (DD+ is incompatible with older AVRs and surround processors)
post #769 of 1724
Quote:
Originally Posted by reddice View Post

I think Amazon uses WMA which the Roku does not support.

That's an interesting consideration. It would indicate that Amazon is not streaming WMA to Roku, though WMA Pro is what you get in a PC download; PCs and Xboxes have support for WMA Pro and can convert it to DD for output. It may be that they don't stream WMA to anything.
post #770 of 1724
I am a self employed software developer and network installer. My guidelines:
If it's portable (phone, tablet, laptop) then it's wireless. If it's stationary (tv, Blu-ray, streaming box) it's hardwired. Hardwired may or maybe not faster, but it is more reliable. If there is a problem the you don't have to worry with hardwired, wireless it's another point of concern. If you are steaming via wired you can pick up the wireless computer and "surf the web" without effecting the stream.

Of course sometimes wired is too expensive or almost impossible.
post #771 of 1724
Quote:
Originally Posted by rdgcss View Post

I am a self employed software developer and network installer. My guidelines:
If it's portable (phone, tablet, laptop) then it's wireless. If it's stationary (tv, Blu-ray, streaming box) it's hardwired. Hardwired may or maybe not faster, but it is more reliable. If there is a problem the you don't have to worry with hardwired, wireless it's another point of concern. If you are steaming via wired you can pick up the wireless computer and "surf the web" without effecting the stream.

Of course sometimes wired is too expensive or almost impossible.

This makes little techincal sense to me. Don't mean to offend, but wireless can be just as reliable as wired. What science are your guidelines based on?
post #772 of 1724

Wireless can be robust and reliable. It's also susceptible to interference and sometimes error prone.

It's preference and opinion, but I agree with RDGCSS, and use WiFi only where necessary. 1 laptop, iPhones, iPad.

The rest of my home and devices are networked via Ethernet.

I have 4 wireless access points. 3 evenly spaced N WAP's around my house on staggered channels 1, 6, 11. And an outdoor AP so I can control my Yamaha outdoor audio zone reliably. And surf the net when it's nice out.

My Ethernet Network devices:

2 Roku 3 4200X
Roku 2 XS 3100X
Roku XDS 2100X
Roku DVP N1000 (still works, except wifi module) wink.gif

2 Apple TV's

Airport Express

Sony XBR-55HX950 TV
Sony KDL-52XBR9 TV

Yamaha RX-A2010 AVR
Yamaha RX-A720 AVR
Sony BDS-790 Blu-ray
Sony BDS-580 Blu-ray

HP Multi-function Printer
NAS

Insteon Hub

Various switches and hubs. Would like to update everything to Gigabit as possible.

One of the first thing tech support asks you when trouble shooting is are you using wired or wireless. Second being how fast is your Internet connection. I have Comcast Blast! 50 Mbits down/10 up. But it peaks from 75-100 down.

That's two things I've easily knocked off their script.
post #773 of 1724
My home theater runs on 5ghz wifi and works flawlessly (except for MLB thru my roku3).The 5ghz supports my oppo bdp103, Roku3, Android devices (x3), MacBook pro & imac. It's a buffalo router running openWRT which serves files to the network.

WiFi works fine if you avoid 2.4ghz. Of course those silly iphones can't support superior technology. :-)
post #774 of 1724
Quote:
Originally Posted by scirica View Post

This makes little techincal sense to me. Don't mean to offend, but wireless can be just as reliable as wired. What science are your guidelines based on?
I am fairly sure the point is to simplify troubleshooting. Wireless transmission introduces additional opportunities for interference; when you can use wire, that eliminates them and the troubleshooting steps to assess them as well when there is an issue.

But then again, living in an apartment with lots of "hotspots", I actually took the post that spun everyone up as a good first step to troubleshooting. I also reboot the modem and the router: I remember counters and memory leaks in some of the older ones would impair performance after a while; and even with a modern one things have benefited on two occasions (not all).

v/r,
C-F
post #775 of 1724
Quote:
Originally Posted by gonzlobo View Post

My home theater runs on 5ghz wifi and works flawlessly (except for MLB thru my roku3).The 5ghz supports my oppo bdp103, Roku3, Android devices (x3), MacBook pro & imac. It's a buffalo router running openWRT which serves files to the network.

WiFi works fine if you avoid 2.4ghz. Of course those silly iphones can't support superior technology. :-)

WiFi can also work perfectly fine at 2.4Ghz. It depends on how many other things are using 2.4Ghz in teh area. Whether I'm using 2.4Ghz or 5Ghz I can easily get 100Mb/s+ wireless N speeds using my PCs. I have had a gigabit backbone for around twelve years, but each year I move more things over to wireless. And especially with streaming only devices, the bandwidths that are being streamed are very very slow. Netflix barely uses any bandwidth. Plus it helps to have a properly setup wireless network. Which means you have mulitiple Access Points and none of the Access Points are saturated and you are using channels that are not crowded. Most of the wireless problems people have occur because their wireless networks are not setup properly.
post #776 of 1724
Yeah, I painted with a wide brush with my post. 5ghz works better in some cases (fewer walls, shorter distances, newer hardware), but you're correct, 2.4ghz works too if properly configured.
post #777 of 1724
Quote:
Originally Posted by aaronwt View Post

In my experience with two Roku2 boxes and one Roku3 box. Whether I'm using the wired connection or wireless connection the experience has been identical. No problems with Netflix or other straming services. Netflix quickly goes up to 1080P streams and stay there. Whether on wireless or a wired connection.

The same here. In my cabin I have a mixture of Roku 2 and 3, both wired and wireless connections within my local network. I also only get 4Mbps download speeds from my ISP, and I've had no issues with Netflix HD streaming.
post #778 of 1724
Quote:
Originally Posted by aaronwt View Post

WiFi can also work perfectly fine at 2.4Ghz. It depends on how many other things are using 2.4Ghz in teh area. Whether I'm using 2.4Ghz or 5Ghz I can easily get 100Mb/s+ wireless N speeds using my PCs. I have had a gigabit backbone for around twelve years, but each year I move more things over to wireless. And especially with streaming only devices, the bandwidths that are being streamed are very very slow. Netflix barely uses any bandwidth. Plus it helps to have a properly setup wireless network. Which means you have mulitiple Access Points and none of the Access Points are saturated and you are using channels that are not crowded. Most of the wireless problems people have occur because their wireless networks are not setup properly.

I doubt you are getting real world 100Mb/s over 2.4Ghz.

If you look here http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/lanwan/router-charts/bar/111-2_4-ghz-dn-c

The Asus RT-N66U gets closest - but others are well below this.

That said I also see no difference streaming wired or wireless 2.4Gz or wirelessly 5Ghz - Netflix streaming is 5800 kbps (+a bit for audio) at best less if you don't have Open Connect.

I use an Asus RT-N66U and and get great coverage and speeds throughout the house.
post #779 of 1724
I also never use wireless if I can connect via wire. The only streaming devices that I use wireless for are down in the living room which does not have a wire. I never get anywhere near as high speeds over wireless that I get over wire, but I get good enough for streaming Netflix. I'm sitting about six feet from my router and I'm seeing about 6 Mbps to my phone and 9 to my Nexus 7; I typically get 10 to 12 on my Roku 2 in the living room downstairs. On all my wired devices I'll see 60 Mbps in the short tests on the web and at least the 50 Mbps that I pay for in the longer ones.
post #780 of 1724
Quote:
Originally Posted by scirica View Post

This makes little techincal sense to me. Don't mean to offend, but wireless can be just as reliable as wired. What science are your guidelines based on?

The school of real world experience (many, many installs and many problems to resolve)
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