or Connect
AVS › AVS Forum › Audio › Receivers, Amps, and Processors › What Would You Like to See in Your Next AVR?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

What Would You Like to See in Your Next AVR? - Page 3

post #61 of 354
Quote:
Originally Posted by DS-21 View Post

The big things (only things, really) that would make me upgrade from my Anthem MRX 300 are:

-A room correction system that PROPERLY handles the modal region. That is, it doesn't ping the mains and subs separately, but sweeps them as a unit to account for not just each piece's FR, but the interactions between them.

-A truly modern modal region correction system with outputs for at least 4 subs, along the lines of Harman SFM or Geddes' method. (It's really a shame that HK hasn't been able to leverage all of Harman's IP and introduce good multisub support on their boxes..)




Yes please, Interaction with subs and mains does cause problems.

I would also like to see a parametric equaliser especially for bass that can be implemented before room correction and a graph displaying results like the MRX's.

Edited by Perv - 3/14/13 at 1:25am
post #62 of 354
One more thing. Probably the most useful app in an AVR today from a sonic standpoint is Anthem's Quick Measure. It's a pretty good, very easy to use, acoustic measurement system to help one position things before applying correction. (It could be better - it only sweeps individual channels: an "fronts and subs with crossovers" sweep to 200Hz or so would make it all anyone needs, basically. But as it stands Quick Measure + correction is way better than setting things up without benefit of measurements, and then hoping the DSP genies fix it.)

It's a shame that the other brands haven't found a way to add similar functionality. They should.
post #63 of 354
Quote:
Originally Posted by GregLee View Post

More channels. Have 9.1 -- looking for 11.3. For the .3 part, I'd just like settable distance and volume trims for 3 subs.

4 independent sub outs, each with it's own distance and gain setting, would be a good thing. 11 internal amps would be good to.
post #64 of 354
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by butsu View Post

How about new advance THX mode? I still want this even nobody talks about it.smile.gif

I believe THX is currently working on finding ways to get more involved in the 'home' theater. it's just a matter of time that you will be hearing from them.
post #65 of 354
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mo949 View Post

Best Audyssey PRo XT 32 (or whatever the current 'reference' edition is) in a 5.1 package, Class D amp, optional bluetooth remote interface, without any other bs features.

that's me.

+1. I have XT32 on my Integra and I must say I wish I had it on my other smaller Denon. It does such a great job and the worse your room, the better it will work.
post #66 of 354
1. Ability to wirelessly share your laptop, phone or tablet screen. Not just the DLNA stuff but full UI/apps mirrored onscreen.
2. Ability to connect NTFS USB2/3 HDD with a wide range of codec for photo/video/music support. FAT32+hobbled codecs suck.
3. Solid DLNA support with a strong enough processor to decode 1080P and a decent 802.11N antenna. (My TV is sitting right next to a repeater and when connected to the same source the repeater gets a 280MBit connection while the TV ends up 52MBit or so. Why the crappy wifi antennas?)
4. Onscreen menus that don't chug along as if they were powered by an 8088 CPU.
5. Why does my $60 5 year old sound card in my computer have better environment and effects processing than my $1500 AVR receiver?
post #67 of 354
Please, AVR manufacturers, do not put network switches in your receivers. You can buy a switch from newegg for $10 and I really don't need any more cables sticking out the back of my AVR, nor do I need the added surface area in the back.

Ditto for built in surge protectors.

If you can save money by eliminating video processing, please do so. Every TV can upscale to it's native format, so there's no need for the AVR to do so also.

Remove 90% of the RCA jacks in the back. Keep one or two, just in case, but there's no need for 20. If I have to play my old game console on the CD input source, I can live with it.

Don't even think about adding peristent memory for content storage. A computer is much better suited for this.
post #68 of 354
I'd like to see multiple HDMI outs with independant HDMI switching.

My current situation is, I have a theater projector and lobby area with 2 TVs. I'd like to keep all of my equipment in the rack and be able to watch all three TVs at the same time through 3 different inputs, or even combinations of inputs (like theater is Blu-Ray and 2 TVs in lobby are the DVR)

My Yamaha has two HDMI outputs, but these seem to only be video and no audio.
post #69 of 354
Better Pre-Amp for two channel "Music" and Bigger Caps and much better power supply.
post #70 of 354
I like to see big over the top flagships with lots of extra channels for those who want them and an equal quality SSP that actually cost less since it does not have the amps. Because we all know XLR jacks cost more than an amp?

+1 to no network switch. There are cheap ones that rack nice and allow for better cable management. AVRs are already a real pita to wire nicely.

I am kind of old school now. I miss the large beefy amps, simple A/V switching. I welcome the new surround formats, and room correction modes. I think these fit nicely in the AVR realm. As for a lot of these other bells and whistles, they seem to fit better as source components. Almost feel like we are going back to the 80’s with the all in one stereo racks. Is a BD player built into the AVR going to be next?

I am sad to see THX go away. Maybe they get with the program again one day, but Audyssey and Trinnov have filled in the gap nicely. I defiantly would like to see both continue to advance their technology. Perhaps a way to enter room dimensions and it spit out where to make physical room corrections that it can't/shouldn’t be fixing via EQ.
post #71 of 354
Can we get an honest power output rating? I want to know how many watts per channel my receiver is giving with all channels (or at least 5) driven from 20 Hz – 20 kHz.
post #72 of 354
Quote:
Originally Posted by KidHorn View Post

Please, AVR manufacturers, do not put network switches in your receivers. You can buy a switch from newegg for $10 and I really don't need any more cables sticking out the back of my AVR, nor do I need the added surface area in the back.

Ditto for built in surge protectors.

If you can save money by eliminating video processing, please do so. Every TV can upscale to it's native format, so there's no need for the AVR to do so also.

Remove 90% of the RCA jacks in the back. Keep one or two, just in case, but there's no need for 20. If I have to play my old game console on the CD input source, I can live with it.

Don't even think about adding peristent memory for content storage. A computer is much better suited for this.


Agree with most everything here. Although I do find some of the better AVRs use better scaling that what is built-in to may displays. Network switch built in is such a joke.

Also, we do not need USB 3.0 support.. nothing you can watch or stream to an AVR is going to max out USB 2.0 bandwidth.
post #73 of 354
Quote:
Originally Posted by GregLee View Post

More channels. Have 9.1 -- looking for 11.3.
Ha, I was going to say "fewer". I have 5.2 and only want 5.2 but with some of the features of the higher end AVRs that invariably have far more channels than I need. 7.1 is fine, but the 9.2 I have (Denon 4311) is overkill for me. All I want are:
1.) clean, powerful amps with ACCURATE power ratings
2.) XT32 room correction
3.) HD, etc. codec processing
4.) dump composite and component inputs.
5.) WiFi
6.) Music delivery software (i.e. AirPlay, Pandora) on-demand so to keep pace with market trends. Right now I'd rather have Spotify than Napster.
7.) Once and for all, get rid of those stupid "arena", "music hall", etc. audio modes!!!
Edited by repete66211 - 3/14/13 at 8:28am
post #74 of 354
One that doesn't do more harm than good.

My ideal AVR for a theater environment is one that goes back to the core surround processor. ie. don't over think it and don't over complicate it. Don't do video processing.

On audio side.
Don't add non needed fluff to pump your spec sheet.
Lose the echo DSP modes
Lose the gazillion legacy inputs (it doesn't need to look like an old telephone switchboard on back)

Core format decodes
Don't mess up the audio signal
Good control of setup (crossovers, eq)
Room correction that doesn't operate in a vacuum (i.e. not point and shoot here's what you get, but one that allows you to see what's going on and make decisions on what is "fixed" or "not fixed and to what degree.)

Should fit in 1 or 2 RU's and not cost as much as a small car.

Something like a Datasat but simplified at an every mans price (<$1000)
post #75 of 354
Why not make it smart, I'm sure there would be a demand for roku like streaming capabilities. Not everyone has a smart TV, so a model for say an extra $50 I'm sure would grab some sales.

The market is headed away from physical media and broadcast TV so eventually a system like this could reduce your component count to one.
post #76 of 354
Quote:
Originally Posted by KidHorn View Post

Please, AVR manufacturers, do not put network switches in your receivers. You can buy a switch from newegg for $10 and I really don't need any more cables sticking out the back of my AVR, nor do I need the added surface area in the back.

Ditto for built in surge protectors.

+++++1 ... yeah, and you know what else you don't need? The added audio noise generated from the spurious EMI generated by all that ethernet connectivity.
post #77 of 354
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by KidHorn View Post

Please, AVR manufacturers, do not put network switches in your receivers. You can buy a switch from newegg for $10 and I really don't need any more cables sticking out the back of my AVR, nor do I need the added surface area in the back.

+1 on that. I usually have a rack mount switch with a patch panel to make everything nice and neat. Don't need a switch and an AVR switch.
post #78 of 354
What I'd like to see most is a receiver that wants to be the center of the universe for my HT. It should handle everything audio and video that I throw at it. Now that doesn't mean it has to be hardware laden, I have plenty of toys that do a lot of things, but i want the ability to run them thru my avr. So that leaves software, Android anyone? With Android you can have DLNA, AIRPLAY, XM,SIRIUS, HD CONVERSION,HD STREAMING, A great OSD, Wireless connectivity, Intenet Streaming, Etc.... As for hardware I don't need phono and vrc anymore guys, anyone that needs them can get a vintage amp. I do need to be able to upgrade my unit, so Pre-outs are required or modules would be nice. As we go up in price High current toroidal amps are needed. So here's my simplified wish list...

1) Android- getting real with todays technology
2) Pre-outs or modules- future proofing
3) Toroidal amps for $1000-$1500- I need clean power
4) time to get rid of old tech inputs- VCR? really???
lastly can we not stack the speaker outputs smile.gif my 2 cents
post #79 of 354
I am with those that are sounding the XBMC/HTPC bell. Let "real computers" in HTPC form handle the codecs and processing. If needed, maybe, continue to have video/DSP co-processor cards in the HTPC until the next-gen multi-core processors on the HTPCs have more and more video/audio processing on-chip as the Intel i3/5/7 processors now do. It is much easier to host and evolve SW on PCs than on embedded systems, by the very nature of the beast. On a PC, you can share the cost of higher-end CPUs with other necessary functions un-related to audio/video. Don't need separate CD/BluRay players, put the drives on the HTPC until all media is in downloadable form (thereby eliminating even more varied processors needed in a typical HT setup). Let the audio vendors work on the analog side, starting with good D/A converters, and very good amplifiers. Spend the money there, and only add the minimalistic processors you need for control of the on-board HW. The change that is going to happen is all on the digital/processing side, the analog side should stay stable. So, build beefy analog systems, hold on to them for the long run, put the variable side on $250 HTPCs that can be replaced on a periodic basis to keep up with the times. From a "separates/modular" point of view, this sounds much more palatable than the high-$ "processors" that hook into pre-amps/amps today.

Mind you, this is for newer systems, as this does leave those hanging on to analog sources out in the cold. But, current generation systems can fill that role, until it is really time to retire those older input sources.
post #80 of 354
pre-out jacks/multi-channel input jacks-remove all DSP. Leave it simple, phono in puts, and no more comp. video. And one more thing, please! give them some looks? no more car battery's. Love the look of receivers in the 70's. We need to get back to vu meters and ports for eq.s
post #81 of 354
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by quad4.0 View Post

pre-out jacks/multi-channel input jacks-remove all DSP. Leave it simple, phono in puts, and no more comp. video. And one more thing, please! give them some looks? no more car battery's. Love the look of receivers in the 70's. We need to get back to vu meters and ports for eq.s

biggrin.gif

post #82 of 354
One I haven't seen mentioned yet: Dolby headphone or similar (/superior?) HRTF, for all digital sources and codecs.
post #83 of 354
Quote:
Originally Posted by wpbpete View Post

What I'd like to see most is a receiver that wants to be the center of the universe for my HT. It should handle everything audio and video that I throw at it. Now that doesn't mean it has to be hardware laden, I have plenty of toys that do a lot of things, but i want the ability to run them thru my avr. So that leaves software, Android anyone? With Android you can have DLNA, AIRPLAY, XM,SIRIUS, HD CONVERSION,HD STREAMING, A great OSD, Wireless connectivity, Intenet Streaming, Etc.... As for hardware I don't need phono and vrc anymore guys, anyone that needs them can get a vintage amp. I do need to be able to upgrade my unit, so Pre-outs are required or modules would be nice. As we go up in price High current toroidal amps are needed. So here's my simplified wish list...

1) Android- getting real with todays technology
2) Pre-outs or modules- future proofing
3) Toroidal amps for $1000-$1500- I need clean power
4) time to get rid of old tech inputs- VCR? really???
lastly can we not stack the speaker outputs smile.gif my 2 cents

Yeah, basically. Like having a built in adroid stick.
post #84 of 354
Quote:
Originally Posted by tlniec View Post

One I haven't seen mentioned yet: Dolby headphone or similar (/superior?) HRTF, for all digital sources and codecs.

I was going to add Dolby Headphone to my list, but didn't think anyone would care. Dolby charges an arm-and-a-leg for the license, so everyone has dropped it from their features lists. But from my experience, DH really is the best headphone surround experience.
post #85 of 354
Quote:
Originally Posted by CMonMan View Post

I know I'm probably not in the majority here but I'd like to have a surge protector, UPC, battery back up and AVR that all have the same style. Maybe a black piano finish, with a couple vertical silver/chrome lines that makes a slightly curved pattern, so when stacking the three together, it looks like it was all made for each other... which it should be. The components would all still be separate, so if you melt a surge protector or a piece of equipment does fail, you only lose that component and not the whole system.... although having them all in one unit would be sweet in my opinion as well.. just not feasible. I want it all to not feel and look cheap. I also would prefer it to have a computer that is easily upgraded.. with a slick user interface... sort of like a gaming console. I'd like it to have all the streaming and downloading options in one place, as well as offer a couple USB 3.0 ports for external storage of media...such as ripped blu-rays. This would allow me to go all digital when the inevitable day comes. I basically want it to be the all-in-one device. It would also be sweet if you could plug your OTA antenna into it. I'd still want at least 4 HDMI inputs...preferably at least 6-8. I'd also like 4 HDMI outputs, each being independent of each other. In addition to this, I would like it to to have the option of either being hooked up via wi-fi, or hardwired. Essentially, I want this receiver to be capable of receiving any media option I could think to throw at it, and be able to have 4 different independent HDMI outputs to send video to any combination projector, monitor, tv's etc. I'd like it to even have a usable browser with an- activity based, or smarter remote.. I'd also like the option of using a tablet or smartphone as a remote control......but it needs to be done right. It has to be relatively easy to set-up, program, customize, and use. In addition, I'd like an equal number of zones as there are HDMI channels... each capable of being independent of each other. Ideally with the ability to have one 7.2 zone, one 5.1 zone, and an additional zone for a few speakers placed in dead zones, a bathroom, out on the patio, etc. The interface is really what would make this thing.. I'd like to be able easily switch which sources are being played on which tv''s. Any given display would only have one hdmi cable going to it.. as long as the remote can simply turn on and off the display, I want the AVR interface to do the rest... I'd like to choose which HDMI output to display the interface on, and from that interface (or even streaming phone/tablet/remote etc) be able to quickly and easily choose what material I want sent to what displays and what audio I want sent to what speaker set up. Then be able to control the proper buttons and decipher between the components easily.. not even so much for me- but for others who will be using my setup. Basically, I would have my OTA stations, whatever popular streaming source you want(HULU, Netflix, etc), whatever downloading option you want (VUDU, Itunes, etc), access to my external hard drive storage via USB 3.0, wi-fi streaming options from my phone/tablet/laptop, etc all at my fingertips, and be able to easily choose what source I want to watch, with the interface making switching between these sources as seamless as possible, and able to put any of my sources onto whatever display I've got. Then I want my audio options to be independent, and easily give me the option of switching what zones are playing what sources as well as deciphering between the zones and controlling the audio settings easy.

What I am envisioning:

One large open, entertaining room.. half bar/game room and half movie/sports watching area. and a separate bedroom or living room room in an attached room.

Independent Displays:
1 projector in my main movie/sports area
1 large plasma in attached living room/bedroom
2 mid-size plasmas behind the bar

Audio zones:
7.2 in main movie/sports area
5.1 in attached bedroom/living room
2.0 above the bar
2.0-one speaker in the bathroom, one outside the walkout patio.

With all the above sources, here is how I envision using it:

1) "day time viewing" 2.0 over the bar, watching one of the plasmas.. or both. with or without the same source on each tv. Possibly using one as a sort of PIP, with the ability of switching the audio signal to whichever display I want to watch. Would also have the ability to watch 5.1 in the attached living room/bedroom with whatever source desired.

2) "movie night" it would be a 7.2, movie experience. Projector and 7.2 being used, any source material I want.

3) "Sunday Sports" Would have the projector and 7.2 being used, any source material I want. Would turn on the 2.0 in the bathroom/outside zone.. and potentially the 2.0 over the bar at a lower volume if desired. All the audio on one source- with the projector and one tv on that same source and the potential to have the 2nd bar tv on a different source (game).... Would be great if you could flip the audio/picture between the two, much like you used to do with PIP. Have the NFC game on proj, tv1, 7.2, 2.0 and AFC on tv2, no audio but when a commerical pops on, press one button to flip it so the AFC is now on proj, tv1, 7.2, 2.0 and the NFC is just on tv2 with no audio... then swtich back after the commericial.

4) "bar night" have all the speakers playing the same full signal.. being able to adjust the volumes independently. With or without tvs on.


Let me do all this with a remote/interface system that my mother can use.

The average person does not have a separate dedicated home theater.. While they do enjoy their movie experience, the room also is used for other purposes like sports watching, media viewing, etc. I'd like something that is adaptable and is really the brains of my system-letting me watch and listen to whatever I want to watch and listen to. You get get rid or all those RCA jacks too. You've got to catch up to the modern world. Of the dozen or so friends/family that I visit regularly who have and AVR, virtually all of them are only using their HDMI, optical, and speaker connections- which should also be improved by the way.. a couple RCA's are fine if you want, but who's actually using all 24 of them? You have to look at the average buyer in the modern world. We want to control all of our devices easily. The average person upgrading their living room tv is also going to upgrade their media sources as well. That's becoming digital, and besides wanting surround sound with multiple zones, multiple displays (what family doesn't have 2 or more tvs within 75 feet of each other?), etc, people want all of their digital media sources available, and want to know that it is going to be relevant for the next 10+ years. It has to be able to connect to their other smart devices for easy sharing of media, it has to offer all the popular streaming and downloading sources (netflix, itunes, hulu, vudu, etc), it has to offer at least some connection to social media (facebook, twitter, etc), if not have a full browser, its got to offer USB for people that have or plan to eventually have digital files of their movies, and it's got to be user-friendly. I don't think it'd be a bad idea to let people hook their OTA antenna to it as well. Most people making changes to their media viewing habits are a) going digital and b) cutting the cable/dish. You've got to find ways to appeal to them. Offer them a device that does all the same stuff that the roku, apple tv, HTIB, gaming console(besides gaming), HTPC, HDMI switcher, power center, and other media equipment does, all in one box. Give them a reason to buy/upgrade their receiver. While it does need to be able to decode all the relevant audio files, focus your marketing on it's other functions. People on this forum will look at the spec sheet for that. The average buyer doesn't know or care that it plays Dolby DTS magic IV, they just assume it will be compatible with everything... so it better be. Market it at "the last media receiver you will ever need to buy" or "the center of your home theater" etc.. and make it that! Give them what they want and really care about- can it play all of my media, can it stream and download movies/tv, can it interact with my phone tablet, can it receive all of my sources, can it send any of that material to whatever display and sound combination I want, and can my wife control it? If it does all that, looks nice, and is marketed that way- there is no reason it won't beat out all the other ugly little new half-ass media toys all these manufacturers are coming out with and no reason it won't be more popular then any other receiver on the market, and no reason for people to hold off on upgrading their home theater. Advertise the HDMI 1.4, 4k and 3d capable, center of the future of home theater blah blah blah. That is what will open people's wallets. Yes, people on this forum are more concerned about the audio specs, but that is their hobby and/or career.. the average user just wants to easily control, play, and listen to their modern media sources in whatever configuration they desire. I realize that the biggest pitfall of creating such a device is cost.. I have no answer for that. Maybe make on model without the multiple independent outputs and one with them. A lot of people will pay 500 bucks to have all this even on one tv if it does everything. Then offer one that takes all the capabilites and lets indepentently output to multiple displays and audio zones.. 2 dispays/zones for 800-1000 and 4 displays/zones for 1200-1500? Maybe you could have the basic functions as a separate piece with all the digital/smart/computer/interface end of it as a separate, matching piece that plugs into or attaches to it. Once you've got all the HDMI, speaker, USB, etc ports, switches, and whatever other magic goes on in a receiver, the only near-future changes that may be desired are going to be on that end of it.... So it would give people the capability of upgrading the "smarts" of their receiver down the line..say every 5 years to stay digitally relevant without needing to repurchase the bulk of the hardware. It would keep the costs down for future upgrades for them- while essentially locking them in as return customer for you down the road. I don't know. Maybe making the whole system modular is the way to go. Someone need multiple independent HDMI visual zones? purchase a 100 dollar shelf to add that hardware, Need to add a 5.1 set up for the bedroom behind that wall, and would rather use the the media sources hooked up this this 7.1 capable receiver? purchase a separate 50 dollar shelf that lets you hook your speaker cables to it. Really need 100 RCA jacks? purchase that 100 dollar shelf. New 3D.2 or faster processor available? upgrade that interface/computer shelf. etc.. Want a matching surge protector, UPS, battery back up, etc? buy a separate matching piece. Could allow people to buy what is important to them only, making the costs worthwhile. Someone want their interface on a touchscreen, wall-mounted device behind their bar? Offer that for 75 dollars that they could flush mount next to their lighting controls. Someone have the money and know from the get-go that they want several of these options? Offer a shelf with 6 independent HDMI outputs and 4 independent sets of speaker outputs, etc. Could even offer bundles with some of the more commonly purchased together items for a few dollars off. Could even offer different rack options, interchangeable face-plates, etc- that let people customize their system with what they need, and able to upgrade their face-plates so their equipment matches, and suites their tastes...all while opening their wallets to YOU. It almost always seems that people are not using half of the ports on the back of their receiver, and many people are forced to buy the higher model for one small feature they want, paying for a bunch of features they don't want OR more commonly just buy the lower end model to save money and end up sacrificing a feature they wish they had. Let them buy what they want, and make it modular... Then offer a website that is easy to navigate and understand what items are needed for your individual needs, and what extra accessories(like faceplates, touchscreen interface, etc) are available for the selected devices as well as any other recommendations/ or commonly purchased components with what is in your cart. Make it sort of like a "build your system" - similar to what auto-manufacturers offer on their websites for "build your XXX car". Have both a list of all products with specs for people who know what they want, but also offer the "build mode", that lets users select how many video (tv/projectors) displays they have (or intend to purchase), what and how many audio zones they have (or intend to purchase) and if they are 7.1, 5.1, 9.3, 11.2, etc., if they have any smartphones/tablets they'll be using with it, then start with a base model, and go through steps, asking if they'd like more audio outputs, more audio inputs, more video/HDMI inputs, more video/HDMI outputs, any external media needs(USB ports, bluetooth), accesories (faceplates, touchscreen interfaces), would you like a matching surge protector(have an 8 outlet, 12 outlet, 24 outlet etc), UPS, battery back up(with different sizes offered) and which one, maybe even offer your own matching external hardrive options.. etc. As hardrives become cheaper or even SSD in the future, you can offer them, or they can add other ones to it. Possibly offer a blu-ray juke box even for people who still want to use their collection. Regardless of the offerings, make it easy to see what is offered, what is needed, what is compatible, what each component does and what it costs, etc. People on this forum can read a spec sheet for all that, but the average home user is not as informed. If you can tell from the rest of my post- I am an interested home user. Most of my friends and family consider me their go-to guy for advice on tech-purchases. I am not rich, but have decent equipment.. mostly just like to drool at what I can't afford. Even considering I know more about this stuff then most of my friends/family, I still don't know half of the terminology and functions of some of this stuff- I certainly would try to market to people in ways that they can understand it, show them what it can do for them without intimidating them with the specs.. People who care about the specs will look them up. Take a note from Apple. I absolutely hate them, but they know how to market a product. simple, clean, get to the point. Their phones and computers can do a lot of stuff and have some pretty impressive stats... but the average user is more impressed with how easy it is to use the software and how it interacts with their other equipment. Get some of these set ups into dealers where people can view them. Spend a bit on advertising on tv and in sources average people will actually see. The average person does not look at avs forums when looking for a new tv, and doesn't read home theater magazines. Find a way to connect with them and show them what your product offers and how easy it is to use and what it can do for them. I also cannot believe how many people do not have any receiver and just buy a tv.. Many completely avoid the audio/receiver isle because it intimidates them and they've never had it. Give them a reason to have it. Get a set up in stores for people to see how it functions and how easy it is to use and how they can control all their media with one easy interface. Advertise how much cable and dish costs are and use the total cost of that for 1-2 years as a way to convince them to switch to digital. Tell them how your product offers any source of digital material available and how the can use the money they save by cutting dish to purchase your product instead. I don't have all the answers- but I see so many users that do not have a receiver and I see why they don't- You need to find ways to appeal to the average user. That's my opinion. You ask audiophiles what they want and you market to them. sure you'll get rave reviews here- but your not going to sell to the average household. Right now you are a like a manufacturer of Indy-cars trying to find ways to get the average car-driver to buy your car. While the race-car enthusiasts are thrilled with the basic specs of going fast- they average driver wants power locks and windows with a gps and cupholders. You're not going to sell a stock-car to a family that needs a minivan with third row seats, tv screens, cup holders, and floor mats.

Give us cupholders.

Well that's my wishful thinking... it's all technically possible right? What would this sort of stuff cost?



I added a significant amount to this original post from page 2. I not a home theater expert, but would consider myself an average american consumer with a passion for home-theater and technology. I know my expertise is not equal to that of many of you, but most of my friends and family consider me their go to guy for advice on their purchases. I tried to answer this not necessarily from my perspective, and certainly not that of an audiophiles- but more from what I see as things that are needed to capture the market of your average consumer. If anyone more in the industry has a couple minutes to read my thoughts, I'd really like to hear your opinions as to whether or not you agree with it. (not so much what YOU want, but more of if it's something that the average household buyer would want). Any other thoughts on cost/feasibility, things you think would make it appeal more/less to the average consumer?
post #86 of 354
Well, you can already use the blu-ray tray as a cupholder biggrin.gif
post #87 of 354
Yeah, when I make my switch to digital- I plan to rip my blu rays to a hard drive of some sort.. But, a lot of people are still going to have a lot of blu-rays for a long time.. offering a separate, optional component for them to store and easily access them may be just one more a) reason for them to buy YOUR receiver and b) way to make money. Not everyone would buy it, but some would. Sort of the idea with what I'm envisioning. Make something nobody can complain about. Offer anything that people might want without forcing anyone to pay for features they don't. When the guy that bought it decides to get rid of the blu-ray collection, he can take that component out of his system, sell it to someone else and still have a functioning receiver.. He might even use that money to replace it with an external hard drive and new faceplates or to get the most recent "computer" component that is now 3d.2 and 8k capable to replace the 3d, 4k model currently in his receiver.. Not only do they feel they aren't wasting money for features they don't want, but once they have they system, they pretty much are forced to keep buying YOUR components down the line for any future upgrades. It's a win-win for both parties, assuming it's feasible- of which I don't really know. I am sure it would be more complicated then offering one all-in-one product with a half a dozen different configurations that they do now, but I think by not needing to buy certain pieces, you could mark it up enough to negate those extra costs. I would expect to spend an extra 50 bucks for 2 more HDMI inputs on the current line-up of receivers... but if I didn't need 18 RCA jacks in the back of my receiver and didn't need to pay the 75 dollars it costs to put them in on the next model up, I would be happy buying a separate shelf with 2 HDMI inputs for 100 dollars instead of the 125 it would otherwise cost to get gain that feature. I don't know what this equipment costs to design, manufacturer, etc. and have no idea what the breakdown is for expenses. Is it feasible to do something like this? I'm curious. If so, it sounds like a win win.
Edited by CMonMan - 3/14/13 at 1:06pm
post #88 of 354
Quote:
Originally Posted by mo949 View Post

Best Audyssey PRo XT 32 (or whatever the current 'reference' edition is) in a 5.1 package, Class D amp, optional bluetooth remote interface, without any other bs features.

that's me.

But what happens when in 6 month your RC isn't the current reference anymore? wink.gif
post #89 of 354
What AVR can play back digital media better than a $80 Roku?

Then why have it then? Just get s $80 Roku.
Easier to upgrade that then the whole AVR.

An AVR should just be what the acronym means. Audio/Video switching, and amplification.
The rest can be done separately and you only need to upgrade those bits that become updated rather than the whole AVR.
OEM marketing has us all upgrading every six months now and it is getting silly.
post #90 of 354
Quote:
Originally Posted by bootman_head_fi View Post

What AVR can play back digital media better than a $80 Roku?

Then why have it then? Just get s $80 Roku.
Easier to upgrade that then the whole AVR.

An AVR should just be what the acronym means. Audio/Video switching, and amplification.
The rest can be done separately and you only need to upgrade those bits that become updated rather than the whole AVR.
OEM marketing has us all upgrading every six months now and it is getting silly.

The Roku is just another source component...
Regarding the AVR functions you left out a couple of crucial functions that have to be done somewhere within the system if not the AVR..
These are:
  • Setup
  • Control
  • Distribution
  • Transcoding
  • Decoding

Just my $0.02.. wink.gif
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Receivers, Amps, and Processors
AVS › AVS Forum › Audio › Receivers, Amps, and Processors › What Would You Like to See in Your Next AVR?