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Running Power Cable into wall

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
I am looking to put all my components underneath my staircase. The electrical outlet is located on the other side of the staircase wall. The staircase wall is cinder block. The wall where the electrical outlet is drywall.

I was thinking of drilling a hole through the cinder block and running a power cord through there. The dry wall side is uninsulated. The total length of the cord through the wall would be less than 12 inches. Probably 4 inches between cinder block and drywall and 8 inches through the cinder block.

It probably isn't up to code, but was wondering it was really that big of a deal? Or other options?
post #2 of 11
DEFINITELY NOT up to code, unless by "power cable" you mean running 14g (or 12g) 3 conductor electric wire, pigtailing to the existing outlet and installing a new outlet under the stairs.
post #3 of 11
post #4 of 11
For no more work than you're talking, do it right (Powerbridge or equivalent)
post #5 of 11
Reminds me of this:

post #6 of 11
I'm in a lot of home for work (residential satellite installer) and you wouldn't believe how many times I've seen that done. I've definitely seen my share of "shady" electrical work.
post #7 of 11
The powerbridge is nice, but for less than $10 you can do this properly and to code without any special tools. Just pigtail off the existing outlet and run romex to a metal workbox.

This isn't really the type of application for something like the powerbridge.
post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by tighr View Post

The powerbridge is nice, but for less than $10 you can do this properly and to code without any special tools. Just pigtail off the existing outlet and run romex to a metal workbox.

This isn't really the type of application for something like the powerbridge.

confused.gif It's exactly the application the powerbridge products were built for... Mostly for low-volt installers to be able to wall-mount TVs without touching line voltage gear, so they don't have to be licensed electricians to do that job. (probably a technicality really)

But you're right, with an outlet that close (in the same stud bay), running romex from the existing outlet to form a new outlet at TV-height is a good choice and not that difficult. Doing that well would use a recessed outlet box behind the TV, and you'll want a scoop for the low-volt cables to enter from below, so a 'good' job will be more than $10... But it will be correct and up to code.

The last wall mount I did in my house as a retrofit I installed a four-gang Arlington 'TV Box', which gives a lot of room behind the TV, but also makes it really simple to fish the romex up from the outlet, as you can get your whole arm in the wall! The 3-4 gang TV Box is around $20.
post #9 of 11
The power bridge product also allows you to run your TV or PJ to a SPD/UPS/conditioner.

I used a similar Midlite outlet/extender to run my LAN equipment in a LV enclosure to my UPS.

Midlite_4642-W.jpg
post #10 of 11
I say that based on his post saying nothing about cables themselves, just power. He's not installing a TV, he's putting components on a shelf underneath a stairwell on the other side of cinderblock, and the nearest power is on the other side of that block. A powerbridge is overkill for the application. He doesn't need recessed power or cables, unless I am mistaken.
post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by tighr View Post

I say that based on his post saying nothing about cables themselves, just power. He's not installing a TV, he's putting components on a shelf underneath a stairwell on the other side of cinderblock, and the nearest power is on the other side of that block. A powerbridge is overkill for the application. He doesn't need recessed power or cables, unless I am mistaken.

You're correct, my mistake - he didn't mention a TV, just relocating components. And reading it again, he's got a cinder block wall to deal with. Powerbridge won't help there - if anything, a surface mounted metal box on both sides with that $10 worth of parts is the best answer.

Sorry for the confusion,

Jeff
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