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Do You Suffer From 3D Sickness? - Page 2

Poll Results: Do You Suffer From 3D Sickness?

 
  • 48% (154)
    Never
  • 15% (50)
    Always
  • 19% (62)
    Sometimes, depending on the program
  • 2% (7)
    Sometimes, depending on where I sit
  • 8% (28)
    Only with active-shutter glasses, not passive glasses
  • 1% (5)
    Only with passive glasses, not active-shutter glasses
  • 4% (13)
    I've never seen stereoscopic 3D
319 Total Votes  
post #31 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dark Matter View Post

Jaws 3D - I'm not sure what the deal was, but it didn't look 3D at all. It was on HBO maybe 30+ years ago. I got my red/blue glasses out of a Captain Crunch box, I believe. At least it didn't hurt my eyes, though, and I loved the movie.

That's funny. I saw it in the original run at a drive-in. It just looked murky to me, with barely perceptible 3D effect.

RealD presentations in theater aren't much better, dunno why I still bother, But I wanted to see The Hobbit over Christmas and it looked pretty bad. (I didn't want to drive the considerable distance to the nearest IMAX.) Is this common? None of the RealD presentations I've seen looked good. Maybe just lousy theaters?

Anyway, there's no comparison at all with my 65" LG passive set. 3D Blu-Rays look wonderful.
post #32 of 123
I get very uncomfortable headaches about 45 seconds after putting on the glasses and looking at the screen. That i don't really experience what I would call 3D. Its doesn't seem to pop out at me. I just see blurry back ground and semi clear foreground that is had to focus on. I have 20/20 vision. I love HD and am stoked for better resolution coming(4K) . So i don't know ...
post #33 of 123
I have yet to go to see a 3D movie in the theaters where I do not experience eyestrain or nausea, I do not always get a headache but I have gotten that on occasion as well.

I am rather curious however, if the active shutter glasses would affect me differently than the glasses you get at the movie theater.

My wife also gets eye strain and does not enjoy it.

That said, I do not want to buy a small tv that is 3d capable either, if I wanted 3d in my home I would by a projector for it..
post #34 of 123
My wife and daughters get sick every single time they watch a 3D movie. I wear contacts and I get eye strain and some times I get sick.
post #35 of 123
Along with occasional nausea I find 3D after the initial gee whiz effect distracting to the film itself except for Avatar because there was no story to get distracted from.
post #36 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave84 View Post

Along with occasional nausea I find 3D after the initial gee whiz effect distracting to the film itself except for Avatar because there was no story to get distracted from.

HAHAHA!

+1

I describe it as a lesser Dances With Wolves in space
post #37 of 123
I don't feel sick, but it does make me tired....I think. Not sure if that's the cause, or if I'm actually just tired since we typically watch movies in the evening after getting our toddler to bed smile.gif
post #38 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by fritzi93 View Post

That's funny. I saw it in the original run at a drive-in. It just looked murky to me, with barely perceptible 3D effect.

RealD presentations in theater aren't much better, dunno why I still bother, But I wanted to see The Hobbit over Christmas and it looked pretty bad. (I didn't want to drive the considerable distance to the nearest IMAX.) Is this common? None of the RealD presentations I've seen looked good. Maybe just lousy theaters?

Anyway, there's no comparison at all with my 65" LG passive set. 3D Blu-Rays look wonderful.

That's interesting, that you've had a bad experience with RealD (I incorrectly called it "Real3D" earlier) but your LG set's 3D looks good at home. I thought I heard or read before that the RealD glasses are the same as the ones LG uses, so I would think it'd be the same. Maybe it is the quality of the theater's equipment, or something with greater view distances causing more eye strain...an interesting research project. Maybe someone with an unusually large home theater will chime in on their 3D experiences.
post #39 of 123
This isn't a scientific poll. So you really don't know how accurate these results reflect the general population. I think there are a lot of 3D haters on the forum that want the format to go away.

Also I think a lot of experiences are more related to the 3D viewing environment. I see a lot of people hating on active shutter because the flicker is noticeable. I think this is a problem in bright environments where you have lighting near the display. In my projection room I never notice the flicker unless I look at a LED or other light source. I can see where some people don't like active shutter but for most it the easiest and cheapest way to do a 3D projection system.
post #40 of 123
I thought RealD was preferable for cinema since it uses circular polarization. IMAX passive uses linear which causes an issue with head tilt.

I thought the HFR RealD version of the Hobbit looked fine.
post #41 of 123
With passive glasses, it all depends on the film. I start getting a headache when I start watching Clash of the Titans for instance. It was poorly converted.

Active glasses is pure headache for me and not even an option. Passive is better. I think I managed to watch two full 3D movies without any symptoms.
post #42 of 123
Sucks that some people don't like it or unwilling to try it out. It can be pretty fantastic and, when done right, is much more engaging than just a 2D movie. As for those that tried it and found that it bothered their eyes, it is definitely something that your eyes get used to over time. I used to be bothered by it the first few 3D movies I saw. Now, I never have any problems and I actually think my eyes are able to resolve some of the 3D better than before.
post #43 of 123
Never had any problems at a theater. Never had any problems with any Blu Rays. I've got some SBS and Top/Bottom (?) stuff on a hard drive that's ok, just not as good.

However, through Comcast On Demand there are some programs that aren't too well done. They're SBS or TopBottom (the worst in my experience) and while it doesn't give me a headache, they look… hard to explain…. 'greasy' maybe? Like the effect is having a hard time reconciling. Not really crosstalk, I don't think. Just an extra layer of everything squishing around with the motion. Yeah, greasy.

If I'm buying a movie and the 3D is an option I usually spring then extra few bucks. I've had friends and relatives over and they always remark the 3D experience was better than they expected.

One time I got a big pimple right in the middle of my eyes were the Samsung glasses press against my head. eek.gif Not sure what happened there. I haven't had one of those in 20 years. smile.gif I clean that area on my glasses after use now (it's where the battery goes). It was a bad one. Not cool. smile.gif

What I used. PN51E7000 Active Shutter
post #44 of 123
I've gotten almost instant headaches from looking at the 3D samples setup at Bestbuy. Eye strain is a big problem I have, whether it be with very bright phone screens to computer monitors or even the sun itself. I've never felt nauseated from trying to watch 3D content, but I have felt a bit of vertigo on top of the headaches.

I have a slightly lazy eye. One eye has normal, 20/20 vision, while the other is more like 30/20. After a long day of working on the computer I typically have a headache and my weaker eye is literally half closed and barely being used.
post #45 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by blastermaster View Post

Sucks that some people don't like it or unwilling to try it out. It can be pretty fantastic and, when done right, is much more engaging than just a 2D movie. As for those that tried it and found that it bothered their eyes, it is definitely something that your eyes get used to over time. I used to be bothered by it the first few 3D movies I saw. Now, I never have any problems and I actually think my eyes are able to resolve some of the 3D better than before.

To be honest, I was never really interested in it after the Jaws 3D experience, but I have tried it a few more times. As far as the getting used to the discomfort over time, it's been 30 years, so for me I think it's safe to say that either my eyes don't like it (I am very light sensitive) or I just haven't seen it implemented properly yet. I may give it another shot, but for me, suffering eye strain just to get used to watching 3D movies on a flat screen isn't much of a return on investment that I'm willing to make very many more times. Now, if we ever get to the point of having practical, mass produced holograms or something of that nature in my life time, I'd really be interested then. I'd always dreamed that there was a way to have a projector behind the seats, and one on the ceiling pointing downwards toward the viewing area, and the two images could be altered, timed, and calibrated to intersect somehow, then there could be a true image in a 3 dimensional space. Or even an array of projectors on the ceiling pointing downward, connected in a multi monitor fashion. Maybe it would require something as exotic (and ridiculous) as cooling down the light beams to slow them down to a more manageable speed, but I'm sure that's all wishful thinking.
post #46 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by akcorr View PostBoth my wife and I both get sick when we watch in 3D. My wife actually had to run to the bathroom to throw up the first time we saw a movie in 3D (Alice in Wonderland). Avatar was the next and that was fantastic but still came away feeling nauseous.

I hear you it is nasty, that's why they had a disclosure statement regarding 3D

 

http://betanews.com/2010/04/23/warning-3d-tv-can-kill-you/

 

 

Samsung's safety advice for using one of its new 3D TV sets includes the following:

"Children and teenagers may be more susceptible to health issues associated with viewing in 3D and should be closely supervised when viewing these images. Children under the age of six should not view 3D TV."

"Pregnant women, the elderly, sufferers of serious medical conditions, those who are sleep deprived or under the influence of alcohol should avoid utilising the unit's 3D functionality."

"Viewing 3D television may also cause motion sickness, perceptual after effects, disorientation, eye strain and decreased postural stability. It is recommended that users take frequent breaks to lessen the potential of these effects. If your eyes show signs of fatigue or dryness or if you have any of the above symptoms, immediately discontinue use of this device and do not resume using it for at least thirty minutes after the symptoms have subsided."

"Watching TV while wearing 3D glasses for an extended period of time may cause a headache or fatigue. If you experience a headache, fatigue or dizziness, stop viewing TV and rest."

post #47 of 123
here is a question, does anyone else have a hard time focusing on an image in a 3D movie? I feel sometimes like I am not looking at the right thing and my eyes are trying to focus by they cant...

I just had my eyes checked and I need some glasses for driving at night and I wonder if, when I get them, it will help with the 3D?
post #48 of 123
I do not experience any side-effects whatsoever from 3D, whether passive or active, or even with the fake conversion 3D built into TVs and projectors. I can watch 3D, even those poorly done German 3D conversion movies, for hours on end with no complaints. Guess that explains why I am a huge 3D movie fanatic... lol.

I will always buy and view the 3D version of a movie if it exists... and 3D is just plain awesome sitting 8 feet away from a 120" projection screen! cool.gif

Another thing I enjoy is playing music on my HTPC, while projecting a sound-reactive graphic program called G-Force onto the big screen with Windows Media Player, and the projector set to 2D-3D conversion - Imagine how spacy all those colorful kaleidoscope images look dancing to the music in 3D! tongue.gif

2D is Dead. Long live 3D!!

smile.gif
Edited by FreyTheater - 3/20/13 at 12:56pm
post #49 of 123
No sickness issues here, but I do have to 'adjust' my active glasses during a movie. I guess they are kinda heavy but not so heavy that I hate putting them on. I do like the format though especially when the movie is good and the 3D is good, but I am willing to give any 3D/2D movie a try.
post #50 of 123
Sometimes an impairment is a blessing. I don't have stereoscopic vision so I will never have to worry about 3D offerings either passive or active. I am extremely happy in a 2D world.
post #51 of 123
Anyone tried listening to an audiobook while reading sheet music? Gives me a headache every time.

tongue.gif
post #52 of 123
I watched Avatar and got a headache. Since then I have stayed away from 3D ---- not worth the risk.
Rgrds-Ross
post #53 of 123
I can play 3D video games for hours on end and then watch an entire 3D movie with no issues, but only via passive 3D on an LCD TV. Active 3D gives me a headache within 5-10 minutes.
post #54 of 123
I have gotten migraine often enough for me to pass from now on.
post #55 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dark Matter View Post

That's interesting, that you've had a bad experience with RealD (I incorrectly called it "Real3D" earlier) but your LG set's 3D looks good at home. I thought I heard or read before that the RealD glasses are the same as the ones LG uses, so I would think it'd be the same. Maybe it is the quality of the theater's equipment, or something with greater view distances causing more eye strain...an interesting research project. Maybe someone with an unusually large home theater will chime in on their 3D experiences.

Sure, the RealD glasses work just fine when watching my passive set. I've always saved the glasses and brought them home with me.

What I was getting at is that my TV is far brighter and in focus every time. I'm particularly sensitive to out of focus movies in theater. If I had never seen passive 3D on a big set, maybe my attitude would be like so many of the comments you read on the 3D threads here. That is to say, highly unimpressed.
post #56 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by fritzi93 View Post

Sure, the RealD glasses work just fine when watching my passive set. I've always saved the glasses and brought them home with me.

What I was getting at is that my TV is far brighter and in focus every time. I'm particularly sensitive to out of focus movies in theater. If I had never seen passive 3D on a big set, maybe my attitude would be like so many of the comments you read on the 3D threads here. That is to say, highly unimpressed.

Ok, that makes sense. Yes, anything out of focus kills my eyes; even thinking about anything that make eyes sore--makes my eyes sore. Excuse me while I rub my eyes now.
post #57 of 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Airion View Post

I've never experienced sickness, but I did have bad eye strain for the first few days I used my Nintendo 3DS. It went away and has never come back. I view 3D (movies, PC games) with my projector almost daily now. My guess is it was just a matter of my eyes/brain needing to get used to viewing stereoscopic 3D.

I suspect many if not the majority of people who report sickness, eye strain, or headaches, wouldn't have problems if they were just exposed to stereoscopic 3D more, or more often.

Exactly, for the same reason you don't get your sea legs in a day.
post #58 of 123
My wife and kids go to the theaters once every now and then and catch a 3D flick. Not often, maybe once or twice a year. We just got a 3D plasma a couple of months ago. We watch about 1 titles per week on average. They have never complained and I have never gotten a headache...but headaches for me are a rarity anyway. So I cant say that myself or family have never had any issues watching 3D...and we dont watch it that often either, so I wouldnt say our eyes are very accustomed to it. We watched Titanic in 3D one night and everyone loved it.
post #59 of 123
Just to point out strictly speaking the correct term isn't 'motion sickness' but 'visual vertigo'. In the former, you are actually in motion, like when sitting in a car or on a boat and your inner ear's vestibular system is stimulated. In the latter, you are stationary when watching the movie but your vestibular system is stimulated by visual input from external motion. The similarity in both case is visual and vestibular input mismatch.

Also if you experience a spinning sensation it's vertigo not dizziness.
post #60 of 123
So just what is it about sterescopic 3D that gives these symptoms? I think it's a big mix of the following:


Accommodation/convergence mismatch. That is, your eyes have to focus on the screen but converge at various depths. Our eyes can do it, but normally don't. Some people never have a problem with this, while others do. Luckily it seems that with a little practice, our eyes can learn to do this comfortably. Content is a factor here, as the greater the 3D effect the greater the challenge for our eyes.

Eye problems. Muscle imbalances, differences in vision between the left and right eyes, etc. I think this relates to accommodation/convergence above.

Flicker. Mostly with active shutter glasses, although RealD also works by rapidly alternating polarization.

Hightened sense of motion with 3D. Your eyes might strongly suggest (more so than with 2D) that you're moving, but the rest of your body says otherwise, leading to motion sickness visual vertigo. This too would depend on content, especially video games.

The nocebo effect.

Misattribution. There's a million things that can cause a headache, but it if happens while viewing 3D, 3D will get the blame.
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