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2013 LG LN5300 LED HDTV Review - Page 3

post #61 of 417
Quote:
Originally Posted by Poetik View Post

Black detail is superior on the samsung from what I can see. It's almost like LG purposely picked a VA panel and tried to make it seem like an IPS screen.

I haven't compared the two side by side, but I find the LG black levels comparable to my calibrated CRT (definitely not as good as the CRT, of course). Be sure you have the black level setting correct, as this display seems to handle it differently than other brands/displays. For example, when using component I have to set the black level to high when using YCbCr when low should technically be the correct setting. HDMI black level has behaved as expected so far, though. Could you post the FCC ID on the back so I can be sure you have the same panel?

I used the Samsung EH5000 briefly last year, and I was impressed with its picture quality as well. But the overshoot and terrible handling of any motion outweighed the picture quality. I didn't mess with it too much, as once I saw the terrible inverse ghosting I returned it within days. But I did notice that it seemed to introduce a bit of black crush in the lower shades, which can sometimes give the illusion of more contrast/better black levels. But again, I didn't have it for long and it could have just been incorrect settings.

As for the screen finish, I find the LG to be almost TOO glossy (I can see the reflection of my computer monitor and lamp clearly). Not as reflective as my CRT, but still reflective. I detect no grain in the whites either.

I will be able to have some objective numbers regarding black level and more for everyone when I finish my calibration via spectrophotometer and HCFR by the end of next week.
post #62 of 417
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tralfamadore View Post

I haven't compared the two side by side, but I find the LG black levels comparable to my calibrated CRT (definitely not as good as the CRT, of course). Be sure you have the black level setting correct, as this display seems to handle it differently than other brands/displays. For example, when using component I have to set the black level to high when using YCbCr when low should technically be the correct setting. HDMI black level has behaved as expected so far, though. Could you post the FCC ID on the back so I can be sure you have the same panel?

I used the Samsung EH5000 briefly last year, and I was impressed with its picture quality as well. But the overshoot and terrible handling of any motion outweighed the picture quality. I didn't mess with it too much, as once I saw the terrible inverse ghosting I returned it within days. But I did notice that it seemed to introduce a bit of black crush in the lower shades, which can sometimes give the illusion of more contrast/better black levels. But again, I didn't have it for long and it could have just been incorrect settings.

As for the screen finish, I find the LG to be almost TOO glossy (I can see the reflection of my computer monitor and lamp clearly). Not as reflective as my CRT, but still reflective. I detect no grain in the whites either.

I will be able to have some objective numbers regarding black level and more for everyone when I finish my calibration via spectrophotometer and HCFR by the end of next week.

Yea the ghosting is pretty much the downfall of the samsung. It's weird though because I just bought my friend the 32" samsung (ts-01, samsung panel) and his had no discernible motion blur. Maybe I'm getting motion blur because I have a ts-02 version which is still supposedly a samsung panel or because the pixels are bigger on my 40"? Anyways, I've switched to YCbCr 444 on my Nvidia panel and it brings the colors out a bit for the LG.

My FCC ID is: BEJ39LN5300UB

and the service code is: 39ln5300-ub.ausjljm

Manufactured in Mexico.


Keep in mind, the use of both these screens are as a computer monitor so I'll just start out saying that they are both on PC mode via HDMI cables:

It seems like the samsung shows more detail, effortlessly. If I were to put up a wallpaper, the samsung would show the details in the black areas a lot clearer than the LG. It's almost like I have to turn the brightness up to 70 on the LG before it can match the Samsung and even when doing that, the samsung has a naturalness to it while the LG is all washed out. I really don't know how to put it but the samsung seems "glossier" as in there is more shine to it. It's like a matte lcd screen compared to a glossy finished lcd screen, however both of these have glossy lcd screens but the samsung seems to have more of that effect.

I'll just wait for your calibration settings before I make my final assessments. The LG does have a ton more settings to play with so maybe that can bring it closer to the Samsung's picture quality.

Also I can take pictures with my phone to show you what I'm talking about. It won't be the most detailed picture in the world but it'll give you an idea of what I'm dealing with.
Edited by Poetik - 4/22/13 at 9:54am
post #63 of 417
Quote:
Originally Posted by Poetik View Post

Yea the ghosting is pretty much the downfall of the samsung. It's weird though because I just bought my friend the 32" samsung (ts-01, samsung panel) and his had no discernible motion blur. Maybe I'm getting motion blur because I have a ts-02 version which is still supposedly a samsung panel or because the pixels are bigger on my 40"? Anyways, I've switched to YCbCr 444 on my Nvidia panel and it brings the colors out a bit for the LG.

My FCC ID is: BEJ39LN5300UB

and the service code is: 39ln5300-ub.ausjljm

Manufactured in Mexico.


Keep in mind, the use of both these screens are as a computer monitor so I'll just start out saying that they are both on PC mode via HDMI cables:

It seems like the samsung shows more detail, effortlessly. If I were to put up a wallpaper, the samsung would show the details in the black areas a lot clearer than the LG. It's almost like I have to turn the brightness up to 70 on the LG before it can match the Samsung and even when doing that, the samsung has a naturalness to it while the LG is all washed out. I really don't know how to put it but the samsung seems "glossier" as in there is more shine to it. It's like a matte lcd screen compared to a glossy finished lcd screen, however both of these have glossy lcd screens but the samsung seems to have more of that effect.

I'll just wait for your calibration settings before I make my final assessments. The LG does have a ton more settings to play with so maybe that can bring it closer to the Samsung's picture quality.

Also I can take pictures with my phone to show you what I'm talking about. It won't be the most detailed picture in the world but it'll give you an idea of what I'm dealing with.

I have read that a few people have issues with the picture becoming washed out when using YCbCr on the desktop. I recommend sticking to RGB. Have you tried connecting a different device to it to see if the lack of detail is limited to only the PC? Does changing the input label from PC to something else make a difference?

http://www.lagom.nl/lcd-test/black.php

Are you clearly able to see all the squares on the Lagom black level test? My TV starts to look washed out if I go past 52 brightness, but I am still able to clearly see all the squares in the test pattern. I know Nvidia is also really buggy when it comes to its HDMI output, and most recommend using DVI to HDMI (What I use). I had the exact same problem you had on a Dell S2440l monitor I tried a few months ago, and using DVI to HDMI fixed the problem. It apparently had to do with the monitor requiring Nvidia to output YCbCr to make it not look washed out, when YCbCr should be the setting to make it look washed out. Very odd, and is why I don't trust Nvidia with HDMI anymore.

I would also test the gamma on the Lagom test page, as maybe your LG has a higher gamma compared to the Samsung. Try keeping brightness low and changing gamma to 1.9 and see if that has it look more like the Samsung. I have seen some TVs and monitors that have a gamma as low as 1.8 in the lower shades.

Edit: I found someone on Hardforums that reported his Samsung EH5000 TS01 panel had a gamma of 1.8 on the Lagom's gamma pattern. Setting gamma on the LG to 1.9 should make it similar to the Samsung EH5000. I also read something interesting regarding 1.9 being the natural gamma of the display, and the 2.2 and 2.4 options actually being "enhancements" that introduce input lag. Not sure how much truth there is to that, but it's something to keep in mind.

You have the same panel as me, so there shouldn't be too much of a difference. Your test pattern results on Lagom's will reveal a lot more information.

Edit: I did some digging, and the most obvious answer could be the 4:4:4 subsampling isn't being enabled. Apparently there is also a bug with Nvidia and how it handles the EDID exchange via HDMI (has something to do with audio), and usually changing to DVI to HDMI fixes the issue. Some people still have issues even with DVI-HDMI, and in that case you can enable a EDID override fix.

If your black levels are fine, then 4:4:4 is the likely culprit.

A lot more information at this link:

http://www.avsforum.com/t/1381724/official-4-4-4-chroma-subsampling-thread
Edited by Tralfamadore - 4/22/13 at 1:20pm
post #64 of 417
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tralfamadore View Post

I have read that a few people have issues with the picture becoming washed out when using YCbCr on the desktop. I recommend sticking to RGB. Have you tried connecting a different device to it to see if the lack of detail is limited to only the PC? Does changing the input label from PC to something else make a difference?

http://www.lagom.nl/lcd-test/black.php

Are you clearly able to see all the squares on the Lagom black level test? My TV starts to look washed out if I go past 52 brightness, but I am still able to clearly see all the squares in the test pattern. I know Nvidia is also really buggy when it comes to its HDMI output, and most recommend using DVI to HDMI (What I use). I had the exact same problem you had on a Dell S2440l monitor I tried a few months ago, and using DVI to HDMI fixed the problem. It apparently had to do with the monitor requiring Nvidia to output YCbCr to make it not look washed out, when YCbCr should be the setting to make it look washed out. Very odd, and is why I don't trust Nvidia with HDMI anymore.

I would also test the gamma on the Lagom test page, as maybe your LG has a higher gamma compared to the Samsung. Try keeping brightness low and changing gamma to 1.9 and see if that has it look more like the Samsung. I have seen some TVs and monitors that have a gamma as low as 1.8 in the lower shades.

Edit: I found someone on Hardforums that reported his Samsung EH5000 TS01 panel had a gamma of 1.8 on the Lagom's gamma pattern. Setting gamma on the LG to 1.9 should make it similar to the Samsung EH5000. I also read something interesting regarding 1.9 being the natural gamma of the display, and the 2.2 and 2.4 options actually being "enhancements" that introduce input lag. Not sure how much truth there is to that, but it's something to keep in mind.

You have the same panel as me, so there shouldn't be too much of a difference. Your test pattern results on Lagom's will reveal a lot more information.

Edit: I did some digging, and the most obvious answer could be the 4:4:4 subsampling isn't being enabled. Apparently there is also a bug with Nvidia and how it handles the EDID exchange via HDMI (has something to do with audio), and usually changing to DVI to HDMI fixes the issue. Some people still have issues even with DVI-HDMI, and in that case you can enable a EDID override fix.

If your black levels are fine, then 4:4:4 is the likely culprit.

A lot more information at this link:

http://www.avsforum.com/t/1381724/official-4-4-4-chroma-subsampling-thread

Hmm, after doing some testing, I see that the Samsung can get to the LG 1.9 gamma black levels by lowering the gamma to -3. I guess the Gamma on the Samsung must be higher if that's the case. As for the 4:4:4 subsampling, I have a dvi to hdmi cable connecting the LG to my computer so it shouldn't be a huge problem. I just did some 4:4:4 chroma testing and it actually seems like setting it on the 4:4:4 in Nvidia helps. Doing that magenta text test on the last link you sent me is pretty obvious that it needs to be set at 4:4:4.

I'm really not sure how the samsung is able to have it's level of detail in the blacks without completely washing out the picture. Not only that but the images pop and have a certain depth to them that I haven't seen the LG reach. I'm sure better settings will bring it a little closer but that's about all the testing I can handle for today though.
post #65 of 417
Does anyone know if this TV is available in Europe under a different name, or if LG plans to release it in Europe? Thanks.
post #66 of 417
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tralfamadore View Post

I found someone on Hardforums that reported his Samsung EH5000 TS01 panel had a gamma of 1.8 on the Lagom's gamma pattern. Setting gamma on the LG to 1.9 should make it similar to the Samsung EH5000. I also read something interesting regarding 1.9 being the natural gamma of the display, and the 2.2 and 2.4 options actually being "enhancements" that introduce input lag. Not sure how much truth there is to that, but it's something to keep in mind.

I can confirm this, actually. I saw that same thread on Hardforums and I've tested 1.9 gamma compared to 2.2 and 2.4. While playing Rockband 3 on my Xbox 360, its probably the 3rd best setting on the LG to reduce input lag (PC mode being first, then Black level - High being second).

I had an LG 32LD450 (2010 32" CCFL LCD) and I convinced my grandmother to trade me for the LG 32LN5300 (2013 32" LED LCD) because they are basically the same (except for the backlight technology which she didn't mind {I calibrated with the backlight set so low it barely takes any power} ). I told her I bought my TV for the same price and they have both the same features (plus, I had the 32LD450 calibrated so it was already set up for her unlike the 32LN5300).

Both TV's have the Gamma, PC mode, and Black Light setting respectively, albeit the LN5300's PC mode actually works like it suppose to, where as the LD450's PC mode enables the 4:4:4 "window" but still keeps red and magenta, hell every bit of text blurry (EDID override needed). This means LG has responded to the Issue of having 4:4:4 and Audio at the same time over a single HDMI cable. Thank gawd...

TV's have always been hardcoded/built around 1.8/1.9 gamma for TV broadcast material. Computer monitor's are built around 2.2 gamma because they initially don't get used with terrestial coax signals (unless you have an HDMI equipped monitor and use a set-top box). Changing the Gamma setting on a TV is totally an enhancement. You calibrate for gamma using a video card's settings, not the TV and will cause input delay (same kind of effect the TV has when it has to calculate the 0-15 and 236-255 shades while using LOW black level).

Set it to 1.9 and calibrate everything for that range. You will also receive the best contrast ratio. Perfect gamma is the hardest thing to calibrate for on a display so don't be disappointed if you can't properly calibrate for 2.2.
Edited by MDA400 - 5/7/13 at 9:45am
post #67 of 417
came to my costco this week:

item 903253 32 inch ln5300

34L00d2

ub a USYLJM


cant tell ips or va. but looks soo nice. too bad i purchased the 32 westinghouse 5 month ago. at 1366 i still think my 720 westy looks sharper for text than the LG. 1920 is too tiny text for me and downscaled res look blurry bad
post #68 of 417
Can someone post calibrated settings for HDTV viewing? I do not use this tv as a pc monitor, but it seems like this entire post is solely focused on it as a pc monitor. guess no one in here has it calibrated for TV viewing?
post #69 of 417
Quote:
Originally Posted by adaweawe View Post

cant tell ips or va. but looks soo nice. too bad i purchased the 32 westinghouse 5 month ago. at 1366 i still think my 720 westy looks sharper for text than the LG. 1920 is too tiny text for me and downscaled res look blurry bad

Its IPS. The viewing angle doesn't cause inverted coloring at extreme angles and Black Levels seem average compared to a VA panel. But motion doesn't suffer as with VA. Also, if you're using it as a PC monitor, remember to rename the HDMI input label to "PC" to eliminate blurry text.

Quote:
Originally Posted by celwin View Post

Can someone post calibrated settings for HDTV viewing? I do not use this tv as a pc monitor, but it seems like this entire post is solely focused on it as a pc monitor. guess no one in here has it calibrated for TV viewing?

Could try mine?

Expert1

Backlight - 10 to 15/100 (i use 10)

Contrast - 95-98 (after 20-point IRE i got to bump it up to 98)

Brightness - 50

H sharpness - 10

V sharpness - 24

Color - 52

Tint - 0G/0R (midpoint)

Color Temp - Warm1

Color Gamut - Wide

All enhancements - OFF (Dynamic Contrast, MPEG noise filter, DNR, etc.)

Gamma - 1.9

Black Level - Low (High for PC use)


And for 20 Point IRE:

IRE 100 - R17 G22 B29
IRE 95 - R16 G21 B28
IRE 90 - Same as above, but minus 1 on each color channel and do that all the way until you reach IRE 0

For Independent color channel (saturation):
Blue - Saturation -2 (Luminance and Tint are 0)
Red - Saturation 1
Green - Saturation 1
Cyan - Saturation 4
Magenta - Saturation 1
Yellow - Saturation 4


Hope this makes somewhat of an improvement.
Edited by MDA400 - 5/8/13 at 2:28pm
post #70 of 417
anyone know what the "motion eye care" does on this TV? i cant tell difference. coudl see strobe when i did waggle finger test tho

google search turned up nothing convincing
post #71 of 417
Quote:
Originally Posted by adaweawe View Post

anyone know what the "motion eye care" does on this TV? i cant tell difference. coudl see strobe when i did waggle finger test tho

google search turned up nothing convincing

Motion Eye Care (just named "Eye Care" on previous models) basically detects when the image gets rapidly brighter than it was a split second ago. It dynamically adjusts BACKLIGHT brightness so your eyes don't strain from the rapid change in luminance from the Movie or Game you may be playing.

I have tried this out on my past 32LD450 and it lags behind the brightness of a movie or game because as with any enhancement, it calculates the image first, then applies the enhancement (which takes time of course). Best for static/slow moving bright images.

Or you could adjust backlight manually to set a "high point" to how bright the backlight will be so you won't be annoyed by rapidly changing brightness (Not the same as Dynamic Contrast though).
Edited by MDA400 - 5/9/13 at 8:44am
post #72 of 417
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDA400 View Post

Its IPS. The viewing angle doesn't cause inverted coloring at extreme angles and Black Levels seem average compared to a VA panel. But motion doesn't suffer as with VA. Also, if you're using it as a PC monitor, remember to rename the HDMI input label to "PC" to eliminate blurry text.
Could try mine?

Expert1

Backlight - 10 to 15/100 (i use 10)

Contrast - 95-98 (after 20-point IRE i got to bump it up to 98)

Brightness - 50

H sharpness - 10

V sharpness - 24

Color - 52

Tint - 0G/0R (midpoint)

Color Temp - Warm1

Color Gamut - Wide

All enhancements - OFF (Dynamic Contrast, MPEG noise filter, DNR, etc.)

Gamma - 1.9

Black Level - Low (High for PC use)


And for 20 Point IRE:

IRE 100 - R17 G22 B29
IRE 95 - R16 G21 B28
IRE 90 - Same as above, but minus 1 on each color channel and do that all the way until you reach IRE 0

For Independent color channel (saturation):
Blue - Saturation -2 (Luminance and Tint are 0)
Red - Saturation 1
Green - Saturation 1
Cyan - Saturation 4
Magenta - Saturation 1
Yellow - Saturation 4


Hope this makes somewhat of an improvement.

havent tried this yet, and I see you adjusted gamma, but wouldnt a 10 backlight be extremly dim ?
post #73 of 417
Quote:
Originally Posted by bucknuts07 View Post

havent tried this yet, and I see you adjusted gamma, but wouldnt a 10 backlight be extremly dim ?

I just watched Terminator 2 in HD last night on Netflix and it looks so accurate with that calibration (I calibrated it with Lagom.nl/lcd-test). See if its the same for you.

Unless you have sunlight shining straight on the TV or diagonally to it (or even behind it), then you don't need the backlight turned up past 40-50 at most.

I just use the TV in my basement with a single windowwell that light only shines down at the ground (not straight on it). So I can keep the TV that low and its still bright. You WANT to lower the backlight as much as possible to reduce power consumption and increase backlight lifespan (even though LED's should last like forever).

Set it to your preference, but if you're big on saving money (which is a good habit, lol) then turn it down to somewhere in the 0-50/100 range.
Edited by MDA400 - 5/9/13 at 10:32am
post #74 of 417
Does anyone know if the 42" version of this TV is a VA panel? I am probably going to order one this afternoon and just want to know.
post #75 of 417
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDA400 View Post

I just watched Terminator 2 in HD last night on Netflix and it looks so accurate with that calibration (I calibrated it with Lagom.nl/lcd-test). See if its the same for you.

Unless you have sunlight shining straight on the TV or diagonally to it (or even behind it), then you don't need the backlight turned up past 40-50 at most.

I just use the TV in my basement with a single windowwell that light only shines down at the ground (not straight on it). So I can keep the TV that low and its still bright. You WANT to lower the backlight as much as possible to reduce power consumption and increase backlight lifespan (even though LED's should last like forever).

Set it to your preference, but if you're big on saving money (which is a good habit, lol) then turn it down to somewhere in the 0-50/100 range.

Thanks for the settings. I could not deal with back light at 10. Good for movies, but not soo good for sports. Bumped it up back to 50.
post #76 of 417
Quote:
Originally Posted by celwin View Post

Thanks for the settings. I could not deal with back light at 10. Good for movies, but not soo good for sports. Bumped it up back to 50.

I tried the settings out last night with netflix, looks amazing. I would think of this more as a cinema setting, and if you are gaming, or watching sports, you would want different settings. This tv throws out a great picture though. @mda400, what size is your panel ? Any chance you have settings for game mode ?
post #77 of 417
Quote:
Originally Posted by bucknuts07 View Post

I tried the settings out last night with netflix, looks amazing. I would think of this more as a cinema setting, and if you are gaming, or watching sports, you would want different settings. This tv throws out a great picture though. @mda400, what size is your panel ? Any chance you have settings for game mode ?

I have the 32" panel. Get ready for some more readin' rolleyes.gif

I don't use the game picture mode because there is no benefit to me using game mode over ISFccc Expert 1 or 2 picture mode (which you get more options to calibrate with). The Input Delay when you set your HDMI label to "PC" will be cut down to the same as using the Game picture mode and you also enable 4:4:4 (which Modern Consoles should be able to output). So I advise you use the Expert picture modes and then do the Input Label trick for gaming as the Expert picture modes can achieve the same input delay and produce overall better picture quality than the other pre-named modes.

I calibrated those settings above, with my desktop connected by HDMI to the TV. Although 4:4:4 was used in that situation, that won't dictate if these settings are for a PC or for a movie or anything.

This calibration is ment for all around use. It's generally not necessary to calibrate ALL of your settings for different sources. The basic picture settings (Brightness, Contrast, Color, etc.) should be the SAME for Sports, Movies, and Games, while the only thing you change for different sources is Black Level and the PC input label. Black Level and PC mode to switch between PC content and NTSC/PAL content.

Unless you have a messy source (VHS or an old VHS converted to DVD), then those basic settings should stay the same because you are calibrating the TV's exact range of color contrast, general contrast, sharpness, and brightness. Why do this with a PC? Because PC's output uncompressed RGB (in its highest chroma form) meaning nothing is lost when output to the TV and using test images such as Lagom Test Images will let you calibrate the exact setting for each basic picture option. You don't even need to use PC mode for this calibration because unlike past LG LCD's (which had two different zones of calibration for Normal mode and PC mode), the calibration you set in PC mode will carry over to non-PC mode (no PC input label).

Of course, do not use any "enhancement" because they cause the source material to be ruined to what was intended (even when you're not gaming).

Finally, the color temperature (Cool, Medium, Warm1, or Warm2) should be set to the temperature that gets closest to pure grey on all 20 IRE steps. In my case, Warm1 was easier because medium had too much red tint to fine tune (usually medium yields best results), but Warm1 had a green tint that covered up the red tint to balance out.

Then you can eye each IRE step to remove the Red, Green, or Blue "Tint" out of the grey. This won't be as accurate as using a colorimeter like a Spyder Pro, but will get a lot closer to industry standard 6500K than using the basic color temp. slider in other picture modes. This should be used across all sources even if the source is messy (you're trying to get the most luminance and balance between each color in the image onscreen).

I'm not yelling at anyone to use my calibration settings, but I just wanted to detail why I think each way I found the settings I came up with are somewhat credible. wink.gifsmile.gif
Edited by MDA400 - 5/10/13 at 9:08am
post #78 of 417
Quote:
Originally Posted by celwin View Post

Thanks for the settings. I could not deal with back light at 10. Good for movies, but not soo good for sports. Bumped it up back to 50.

It's ok. Like I said, I use this TV in a basement that is well away from sunlight when needed. At least adjusting backlight doesn't screw up calibration settings. tongue.gif
post #79 of 417
Quote:
Originally Posted by MDA400 View Post

I have the 32" panel. Get ready for some more readin' rolleyes.gif

I don't use the game picture mode because there is no benefit to me using game mode over ISFccc Expert 1 or 2 picture mode (which you get more options to calibrate with). The Input Delay when you set your HDMI label to "PC" will be cut down to the same as using the Game picture mode and you also enable 4:4:4 (which Modern Consoles should be able to output). So I advise you use the Expert picture modes and then do the Input Label trick for gaming as the Expert picture modes can achieve the same input delay and produce overall better picture quality than the other pre-named modes.

I calibrated those settings above, with my desktop connected by HDMI to the TV. Although 4:4:4 was used in that situation, that won't dictate if these settings are for a PC or for a movie or anything.

This calibration is ment for all around use. It's generally not necessary to calibrate ALL of your settings for different sources. The basic picture settings (Brightness, Contrast, Color, etc.) should be the SAME for Sports, Movies, and Games, while the only thing you change for different sources is Black Level and the PC input label. Black Level and PC mode to switch between PC content and NTSC/PAL content.

Unless you have a messy source (VHS or an old VHS converted to DVD), then those basic settings should stay the same because you are calibrating the TV's exact range of color contrast, general contrast, sharpness, and brightness. Why do this with a PC? Because PC's output uncompressed RGB (in its highest chroma form) meaning nothing is lost when output to the TV and using test images such as Lagom Test Images will let you calibrate the exact setting for each basic picture option. You don't even need to use PC mode for this calibration because unlike past LG LCD's (which had two different zones of calibration for Normal mode and PC mode), the calibration you set in PC mode will carry over to non-PC mode (no PC input label).

Of course, do not use any "enhancement" because they cause the source material to be ruined to what was intended (even when you're not gaming).

Finally, the color temperature (Cool, Medium, Warm1, or Warm2) should be set to the temperature that gets closest to pure grey on all 20 IRE steps. In my case, Warm1 was easier because medium had too much red tint to fine tune (usually medium yields best results), but Warm1 had a green tint that covered up the red tint to balance out.

Then you can eye each IRE step to remove the Red, Green, or Blue "Tint" out of the grey. This won't be as accurate as using a colorimeter like a Spyder Pro, but will get a lot closer to industry standard 6500K than using the basic color temp. slider in other picture modes. This should be used across all sources even if the source is messy (you're trying to get the most luminance and balance between each color in the image onscreen).

I'm not yelling at anyone to use my calibration settings, but I just wanted to detail why I think each way I found the settings I came up with are somewhat credible. wink.gifsmile.gif

I thought they looked amazing for netflix, and would assume for general tv, altough mine is simply a gaming tv in my office. I have 32" as well. However on my 360 dash, it looked a little dim, and when I bump up backlight, maybe a yellower tint then I'm used to seeing. I am using the pc input, although game mode still feels just a tad quicker than expert 1, maybe placebo ???. For my xbox I'm using expanded black levels, and rgb for color space, and auto for my black levels on tv. Whats weird is I thought RGB was supposed to mess up netflix, and you are suppose to change before watching Netflix ? As for ps3, have black levels on full .
post #80 of 417
I contacted LG and asked them if the LN5300 was available in the UK and this was their reply:

"Okay, unfortunately that specific model of TV is only available in the US I'm afraid, however, after having a look at our current range of TVs I have found a very similar model which is the LN5400. The units are practically identical in specification and price. So, that model should meet your needs."
post #81 of 417
So is anyone deciphered how the panel lottery works and coordinates with the numbers on the box stickers on the sets? looks like all we hav now are the mexico feb 2013 with the same numbers AUSyLJM

from older post:

"manufactured February of 2013 in Mexico. Model ends in UB-AUSJLJM <---i think thats a typo??? should be Y not J

I tested the screen by applying light pressure with a cloth on the screen surface, and noticed the usual response VA panels have. A light circle with a geometric pattern appears at point of contact, and moving the point of contact leaves a trail that takes time to fade. I am now almost positive this is a VA panel. Now to find out what type of VA panel it is and who manufactured it."


"I have returned! I think the demo 32" Best Buy had isn't an ips. It has the VA panel quality when you press on it, it leaves a trail when you move it just as you said Tralfamadore:


The viewing angles are also like a VA. Doesn't look as good when you're viewing from the side. bucknuts it's the same as your panel man, so one of us is wrong about the ub.ausyljm being ips or not:"



"I honestly have no complaints about this being a VA panel. This is the first VA panel I have encountered that had decent pixel response, and didn't smear the darker shades. The overdrive handled the GTG response so well, I was initially tricked into believing it must be a IPS. "

"am only disappointed that it looks like these TV's having IPS panels were a pipe-dream."

"The LG doesn't have any motion blur at all and I've been playing a lot of games lately so the LG is probably the one I'm gonna keep."

" It's almost like LG purposely picked a VA panel and tried to make it seem like an IPS screen."

"Its IPS. The viewing angle doesn't cause inverted coloring at extreme angles and Black Levels seem average compared to a VA panel. But motion doesn't suffer as with VA. Also, if you're using it as a PC monitor, remember to rename the HDMI input label to "PC" to eliminate blurry text.
"

seems like maybe the feb 2013 mexico version is a really good ips-like VA panel? or it IS an ips. people think its VA because of the finger pressing on panel test, but i wonder how accurate that is. but motion blur is IPS qulity so might as well treat it like an IPS even if it is VA
post #82 of 417
*accidental double post* sorry
post #83 of 417
In Germany the 42" Model is named 42LN5406 , there was a special offer at Saturn Techmarket for 369€ last week.
My Device has a AS-IPS Panel according to
http://www.tftcentral.co.uk/images/ips_comparisons.jpg
(You can set your Digicam to Makro and shoot a dark-grey background on TV to see the pixel structure)
The Picture in PC Mode is awesome and viewing angles are excellent,
although black level could be better and screen has a (little) noticeable "ips glow"
Just for Movies there are better TVs, but this device is a good all-in-one solution for pc/console/tv.
Thanks to SixFootDuo for recommendations here and in hardforum.
post #84 of 417
If you have a Fry's near you the 39" 39LN5300 is on sale for $299. Fry's item number 7572786. Sale is until Thursday May 16, 2013.
post #85 of 417
amazing deal. but imma pass cuz 39 is too big for computer monitor. i really enjoy 32. dont have enuff room to sit far away enough from a 39 incher.

so tempting though...
post #86 of 417
Thread Starter 
I want to call this threads attention to an AMAZING deal. Right now Frys has the LG LN5300 39" on sale for $299.

http://www.frys.com/product/7572786?site=sa:adpages%20page:P2_FRI%20date:051013

Best Buy will match this price but I'm told you have to make an account as they will ask to see the price in your basket at check out.

At $299 this is a super hot deal.
post #87 of 417
So, I've gone through 3 39LN5300's from 3 different stores and they all have what appears to be either back light bleeding or clouding in the center or near the center of the screen. It can easily be seen in a dark room while viewing something like a totally black image. Can anyone else with a 39LN5300 confirm? Once again, make sure you view a totally dark image (dead pixel check black background) in a dark room. Raise the back light setting if you have trouble seeing what I described.


Edited by 52LG60FTW - 5/12/13 at 6:35pm
post #88 of 417
Quote:
Originally Posted by bucknuts07 View Post

I thought they looked amazing for netflix, and would assume for general tv, altough mine is simply a gaming tv in my office. I have 32" as well. However on my 360 dash, it looked a little dim, and when I bump up backlight, maybe a yellower tint then I'm used to seeing. I am using the pc input, although game mode still feels just a tad quicker than expert 1, maybe placebo ???. For my xbox I'm using expanded black levels, and rgb for color space, and auto for my black levels on tv. Whats weird is I thought RGB was supposed to mess up netflix, and you are suppose to change before watching Netflix ? As for ps3, have black levels on full .

Your Xbox settings are correct, but what I would just check is if changing from AUTO black level to HIGH black level manually, do you see a change in contrast? if so, then the AUTO black level should not be used and I recommend switching it manually everytime you go from Blu-ray, DVD, or TV, to a PC or console (AUTO black level does not always work when I switch between my desktop and Blu-rays). Black Level LOW while using a PC or console will increase input lag, since the TV has to create the deeper blacks and brighter whites.

I'm using Netflix from my LG blu-ray home theater system. So the contrast range is not F-ed up like the Xbox 360's is. I do not calibrate for an Xbox 360 as it not possible because the deep black and bright white shades get essentially "blended" or expanded incorrectly and that is why you see an offset with Xbox 360 versus Playstation or Wii (they are doing contrast levels correctly). Changing reference levels does not fix the issue on the 360 because it still blends these shades even at Standard/Limited range (making it offset more than the intended levels).

Some tell it as a rumor between HDMI and VGA. HDMI is a hybrid Video and PC cable (I know it is made of basically DVI protocols, but DVI doesn't support YCbCr like HDMI does), while VGA was solely made for PC content purpose. The Xbox 360 will flag HDMI video and PC content levels inappropriately and VGA I haven't tested since I lost that adapter, but assuming its a PC cable, it will cause the Xbox 360 to output correct contrast levels.
Edited by MDA400 - 5/13/13 at 8:08am
post #89 of 417
Backlight Bleeding on European Model 42LN5406 while TV is in Radio Mode mad.gif

post #90 of 417
Quote:
Originally Posted by 52LG60FTW View Post

So, I've gone through 3 39LN5300's from 3 different stores and they all have what appears to be either back light bleeding or clouding in the center or near the center of the screen. It can easily be seen in a dark room while viewing something like a totally black image. Can anyone else with a 39LN5300 confirm? Once again, make sure you view a totally dark image (dead pixel check black background) in a dark room. Raise the back light setting if you have trouble seeing what I described.

What backlight setting did you use in the photo?
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