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Is the End of Physical Media Inevitable? - Page 14

Poll Results: Is the End of Physical Media Inevitable?

 
  • 2% (23)
    Yes, physical media will quickly disappear altogether
  • 18% (198)
    Yes, physical media will slowly disappear altogether
  • 34% (369)
    No, new physical formats will continue to be developed
  • 44% (470)
    No, but physical media will become a niche market for enthusiasts
1060 Total Votes  
post #391 of 920
Physical discs are not going anywhere. Not everyone has Internet service, let alone fast enough speed for it. The streaming movies are crap quality compared to a Blu-ray Disc. And many people prefer to have the actual disc. Netflix is a joke for selection of movies, with a fee that isn't even worth it.
post #392 of 920
H.265 may take care of some of the bandwidth issues, but bandwidth is still the big problem. I live in a small town (<2000) in Indiana but my ISP (MediaCom) actually has pretty decent cable based internet service. I actually have better connectivity (up to 30 Mb/s on a good day) than my brother in North Canton, OH. His Roadrunner service sucks and seldom reaches even 5 Mb/s. The Canon, North Canton, Akron area isn't super big, but it has often been the fastest growing commercial area in the county over the last 10 years. Yet he can't get better service without paying a fortune every month.

But besides bandwidth from my ISP, there is the issue of bandwidth at the head end as well. There are times that I see the connection speed bouncing all over the place and that is usually due to the other end of the connection, not my end. I've hit servers that can't come close to feeding to me as fast as my ISP can get it to me.

If all you ever want to do is rent movies, the you don't need physical media. But if there's a chance that you might watch it again, then the equation starts changing. And downloading is NOT a solution a lot of the time - depending on the time of day your internet connection can be drastically slower. Of course the fact that the time of day when that problem is the worst is usually the evening - when everyone else is trying to download their TV shows or movies too! And if you buy a movie to download, whether most people realize it or not, hard disk drives are NOT permanent storage. It doesn't take a lot of thinking about it to realize why either - those quite powerful magnets that are used to move the head back and forth across the drive are about 1/8" or less from the edge of the disk platter. So anytime that disk isn't turning, the head magnets are trying to erase the nearest portion of the disk. Now you know why some files become corrupted over time - especially seldom accessed ones or ones on hard drives that are simply stored up on the shelf! This wasn't a problem with the old style removable platters, but they didn't have all that much capacity. And the higher the capacity of the drive, the smaller magnetic particles that are used - which also means they are more easily switched - or erased.

So if you want to have movies that are readily available to watch when YOU want to watch them, physical media is the only viable, long term option at this point.

And to those jerks who think that if you don't live on the east or west coast or at least in a major city with really high speed internet it's your own fault (at least that's the way you come across BiggAW), you might want to consider things a bit more carefully before insulting so many of the folks in the middle of the USA. Whether it's the farmers or the rest of us, you'd have a very hard time surviving without us. Besides, where would you get the Orville Redenbacher popcorn to eat during your movie!!! ;-D

LewK
post #393 of 920
I should add that I only own Blu-ray Discs and would never pay to rent and download movies. There is no way they are going anywhere as there is too much demand and profit from them. They makes much larger profit selling the discs than they would from getting a tiny percentage from a monthly subscription from Netflix.

In fact I would not be surprised if downloaded movies go away.
post #394 of 920
I have to say, some here are living in a fantasy world if you think discs are going away.
post #395 of 920
post #396 of 920
I was just listening to Yellow Brick Road on SACD -- amazing presence -- MP3s are cheap and easy and most people never experience a great recording played on a great system in a carefully design listening environment, so they don't know what they are missing.

But quality has never been the fare of the masses. Cassettes held on for years after CDs became common. MP3s appealed to young people because they can buy one or two favorite songs without the expense of an entire album.

I tell my kids to buy the CD -- that way as formats change going forward they have something physical that can be ripped to the new new thing whatever it is.
post #397 of 920
Quote:
Originally Posted by quad4.0 View Post

Fraank Zaapa had this idea with cable tv in mind. But stated quite correctly that people have a touchy-feely thing, they want to hold the container and read liner notes, and know things about what they are listening to or watching.

Not to be morbid, but like Frank Zappa, those people are at the end of their line (baby boomers and some Gen-X'ers). I doubt a good majority of Millennials feel this way (with the exception of some people here on this forum - they are an exception, IMHO). I'm 42, and I adapt very quickly. I couldn't care less about having another DVD/BLU-Ray or CD case. They always seem to end up on the floor or scattered on my desk. I'm terrible with these things, always have been always will. Plus, even as small as these cases are, they take up a lot of space, IMHO. I got boxes of old DVD's that I no longer watch, and equal number of boxes of Xbox/Xbox360 games and now I got a few dozen Blu-ray cases scattered about. I tried putting them on the shelf or a DVD rack, but for what? Decorations? LOL. As I type this, I'm currently copying my Xbox360 game to the consoles hard drive just so that it can play faster (speeds up the loading time). So much for the DVD media. Good for storage I guess.
post #398 of 920
I hope that physical media doesn't end. I still enjoy reading the text included with albums along with CDs, SACDs, and the like. For the CD media, the text is quite small (nothing that a pair of reading glasses won't rectify), but is very informative in most cases. However, in many of the older albums that are now being re-introduced from the 40s, 50s, and 60s, additional information is provided along with the original notes and I consider that a plus. I still play vinyl (not as much as CDs though) and have always read everything printed on the jacket and inner sleeves. Making all of that written material disappear takes away from the entire visceral experience and removes much of the historical aspect related to the artists, engineers, and the particular musical genre that is represented. I'm often asked by younger enthusiasts that focus mainly on downloaded material from where did I get the information I usually offer in discussions when a particular piece is playing and it is simply from the liner notes that I so much appreciate.
post #399 of 920
Quote:
Originally Posted by techman707 View Post

Google Fiber, Verizon FIOS, call it whatever, once they have you as a hostage, I wonder what they'll do about the cost of internet service? I still remember when AOL started. I was a beta tester for them and they STILL charged a ton of money....and for dial-up service no less.

Be careful what you wish for....it MIGHT COME TRUE! And once it does, you might not like the result.rolleyes.gif

Ha. I also remember when AOL started. Fast forward to today ... AO-what? tongue.gif

Gigabit is going to happen, and ISPs will be either falling all over themselves to compete, or get relegated to the forgotten morass of service providers that couldn't hack it. There will be less choice, and then more, but in the end it will balance out. So far that has been the case, anyway.
post #400 of 920
Quote:
Originally Posted by Friendly Fire View Post

I was just listening to Yellow Brick Road on SACD -- amazing presence -- MP3s are cheap and easy and most people never experience a great recording played on a great system in a carefully design listening environment, so they don't know what they are missing.

But quality has never been the fare of the masses. Cassettes held on for years after CDs became common. MP3s appealed to young people because they can buy one or two favorite songs without the expense of an entire album.

I tell my kids to buy the CD -- that way as formats change going forward they have something physical that can be ripped to the new new thing whatever it is.

Put on a pair of good quality closed headphones and the MP3s will come alive. Yeah, it's not SACD but it's pretty damn good. Truth be told though, convenience trumps quality, but for me and I think for other "former" purists, only when the margin is narrow. I used to spend hours up hours upon weeks ripping my CD collection to MP3 perfection so that I could have the best of both worlds. What a freaking waste of time in given the quality and convenience we have today.
post #401 of 920
Ray Bradbury predicts disappearing physical media back in his a 1956 radio interview. Now his prediction is about come true. Our TVs get transformed in house walls and we do not need physical books or cassetes. Everything is controllable by big corporations and stream to our houses.
post #402 of 920
I see physical media going away when everyone has reliable,fast and affordable internet (no capping) and cheap large capacity backups ( solid state)which currently looks like a pipe dream .
post #403 of 920
I've been hearing this argument over and over for the last year or two. I don't see physical media going away. I love being able to own a physical copy of my favorite movies/TV shows and watch them whenever I want. People will not want to pay $4-5 every time they watch a streamed movie (that's one of the main reasons many people, myself included, stopped renting movies from Blockbuster). If they didn't let us download a copy of the movie, then if your internet was out, you couldn't watch it. If your computer no longer worked and you didn't have backups of all of your movies, they would probably make you buy them all again. And as others have said, internet speeds would have to be pretty amazing to watch stuff at Blu-Ray quality. There are just too many reasons why it wouldn't work to only be able to stream movies. I don't see it happening. And if it does, I'll be one of the people telling the studios to go f*** themselves.
As far as music is concerned, though, I'm on the opposite side. I still like to buy CDs if I'm a die-hard fan of a band/musician, but if they only made music available digitally, I wouldn't mind so much. I love being able to have my whole collection on my computer and my ipod, so if I go on a trip, I don't have to choose a bunch of CDs to bring with, I can just bring my entire collection.
post #404 of 920
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Cutter View Post

I love owning the movie & I have many places that I may like to play it in my house.

First, you do not own the movie when you buy a bluray or DVD. Read the agreement. Second, legally if you want to play the movie in multiple locations, you have to buy multiple copies. Third, if you scratch optical media, you are done. No refunds. Fourth, with hard drives you can have multiple backups way quicker taking up far less space than the DVDs. Artwork is a thing yes, but that is why JPEGS exist. Technically, the jpeg could be even purer than the paper it is printed on, since most print houses print jpegs. So the paper is second generation copy. If you want to stream a movies to multiple locations, that is easy. And the people that rave about vinyl yet do not own at least a Linn Sondeck LP12 player using 180 gram virgin vinyl? Please.
post #405 of 920
The ReDigi decision reminds us that you don't own downloaded media you paid for and can't resell it.
I will never pay for non-physical media unless it's for a rental, and not a purchase.
post #406 of 920
One more thing, if the movie industry could pull their collective heads out and release all their movies and tv shows to a couple different services like NetFlix, AND keep the thing commercial free AND keep costs at 7.99 a month, it would kill movie piracy overnight. Why would I buy a bluray for 20 or 30 bucks when I can download the 36GB ripped file for free in under a couple hours, or a 4GB further compressed version in minutes? Just saying...
post #407 of 920
Quote:
Originally Posted by akakpdx View Post

but if a CD or DVD is discontinued, it is impossible to find.
Not true. Almost ANYTHING that has been released can be bought used or in many cases can still be bought new, except some very rare limited quantity releases that will never be available to stream.
post #408 of 920
i do think the end of physical media is inevitable but it's not a 100% end and it's still going to be another 20 years before it's a real problem. but the problem for me is that my consumer needs have changed enough that i have no real allegiance to physical media anymore. and it isn't because of some incredibly on-the-go lifestyle or tech-forward demands. quite the opposite as a general homebody who stays a year or two behind the tech curve because that's more affordable.

i used to devour lots of movies and music but now i'm a) quite selective for the first viewing and b) quite selective about repeat views. As I get older there is more and more to keep pace with so multiple efforts just dont fit into the pragmatics of it. Music is a bit different because the direct activity of listening still allows for multitasking in life but with movies it often requires my somewhat undivided attention. As such, there's only a handful of movies (20 or so) that I will 'always' watch, meaning stuff i consider timeless and still plan to see again more than once. (i have a small selection of 'every year' movies.) In today's market I can watch something after it's been in theaters up to 3 times for generally less than $10. if i saw it in the theater it generally is only good enough for one more viewing and not ownership. (it's very rare for me to see any of even the best Oscar winners more than twice.) If I was never going to watch it a 3rd or 4th time it doesnt justify me owning it physically.

the next problem comes with formatting. while i know i'll try and watch these movies again im not going to buy a new physical version every X amount of years. I still havent gotten blu ray because some of the movies i'd watch again are no longer on any format i'm able to view now and certainly not on BD. i'm reticent to invest in BDs because of the potential loss of compatibility in the future. honestly, technology is moving too fast for me to abandon my 'permanent' purchasing habits for a new 'temporary' possession mindset. i dont want to have to buy the same thing i bought 5 or 10 years ago. i've already done that with VHS and DVD. im sitting on my xbox and my pc and waiting for DVD to basically become outdated in about 10 years. at least by then i'll get to reassess my need to own a physical copy of something i may finally be done with. i MIGHT get BDs when they are even cheaper (less than $10 each) for the handful of timeless movies I own but I'm waiting to possibly convert my ownership methods to a physical hard drive large enough to hold that collection. the only problem is finding high quality versions worth the conversion.

a lot of these problems would be alleviated by more expendable income but honestly, time is the real hindrance. cinema is still producing great new stuff that i dont get to watch let alone the really great ones that i want to re-watch. consumption changes as I get older. well, c'est la vie.
post #409 of 920
Having hung around some teens, I can tell you that most kids are going to get away from physical media. Just press a few buttons to see and hear whatever you want is the way it's going.

What the big companies want is to control and charge for the content. They are trying to keep it all on their servers so that every time you watch or listen, they get a bit of money - big profits, low overhead!
I'm pretty sure that people in the future will be connected in such a way that every time you listen - they'll take a bit out of your bank account.

This is where it's headed.
post #410 of 920
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gradius2 View Post

I stopped using physical medias since 2007 now (converted almost all into HDDs). Keep in mind they (CD/DVD/Blu-ray) also won't last too long too.

DVD-R is around 5 to 15 years (99% of them).

I don't know where you get this garbage from but I can gauarantee this is crap. I've been using DVD-Rs since 2001 and have NEVER had a problem with a single disc, except a couple of garbage brands from way back when that couldn't be burned without problems. Every single disc that burned properly, even the cheap ones bought well over 10 years ago when discs weren't near as good as they are now, still works just like the day it was burned. Manufacterers rate DVD-R life at more like 50 years. By then I will be long gone.
post #411 of 920
A lot of the stuff that the extreme movie nuts on this forum say about physical media versus streaming has little relevance to most of America. However, that doesn't mean physical media is going away tomorrow. As long as people buy it, it will be around, but there is no question in my mind that we are nearing or at the tipping point where physical media is not the driving force anymore, and streaming is the driving force, with physical media serving a purpose, but not driving the mainstream or driving the market.
Quote:
Originally Posted by AimHere View Post

There are many reasons why physical media will never go away:
  • Broadband Internet speeds and availability continue to grow at a snail's pace, at least here in the USA. Many rural areas may never see affordable, reliable high-speed service (not even 4G wireless).
  • Where decent broadband IS available, the ISPs and wireless carriers usually impose usage caps, restricting the amount of content (video and audio) customers can realistically consume each month. And some of these caps are ridiculously low. Stream or download enough movies and TV, and you can easily hit your cap.
  • Even when ISPs/carriers don't explicitly state a cap, their terms of service usually include a clause where the customer is forbidden from putting an excessive load on the network (and only the ISP/carrier knows what they consider to be "excessive"). So, you may think you can merrily stream hundreds of hours of video every month, until your ISP decides to throttle your connection and/or suspend your service.
  • The bitrate demands of HD video are such that you would have to have an insanely fast Internet service to get the best streaming quality. A Blu-Ray disc can push as much as 48 Megabits/sec of video and audio. The total bitrate may be even higher with other overhead. How many people actually have 50 Mbit/s Internet service? Since the vast majority of consumers don't, the content providers have to heavily compress the video to fit it into the TYPICAL broadband pipe. But compression is always lossy, and the video and audio simply can't approach the level of detail the display monitor may be capable of.
  • When someone goes to obtain any kind of digital media, they have to choose between renting/streaming or buying/downloading, depending on what it is and where they get it from. If they buy and download a copy, they have to store it locally somehow. If you download a lot of movies and TV shows (especially in HD), it can really add up. So, people either have to (a) keep investing in larger and larger hard drives (and run the risk of a drive dying and taking their media with it) OR (b) offload their digital files to some kind of PHYSICAL media (DVD-R, BD-R, etc.). (By the way, even hard drives are technically "physical media".)
  • Downloading purchased content takes time, and you can't really view files as they download, so you have to be patient, or do the downloading well in advance of when you plan to watch the content. OR, run to a store or kiosk and grab a physical disc.
  • Streaming only works when the network does. Congestion can occur at any time, at any place between the content provider and the consumer, and constant buffering/pausing/stuttering can be extremely frustrating. And where there's no network connection (e.g. you carry your cellphone into an area with poor service), there's no streaming at all.
  • Various playback problems can occur on any PC/laptop/tablet/smartphone, due to things like underpowered hardware, outdated or buggy drivers, improperly-installed codecs, hardware faults, overdue system optimization, malware infections etc. These kinds of problems are generally rare on dedicated players that use physical media (e.g. DVD and Blu-Ray players).
  • No online content provider has everything a person might want to watch or listen to. So you might find yourself setting up accounts with multiple providers, which means more hassle on your part.
  • And they all have different program/content guides, different playback systems, different control schemes, etc. (compare this to a typical Blu-Ray player which works the same way no matter who produced/distributed/sold/rented the content).
  • Finally, let's not forget that future digital formats (like 4K Ultra HD) will put even greater demands on the world's content-distribution infrastructure. Internet streaming of 4K content would require far more resources than most people would have available or would be willing to pay for, which pretty much leaves some kind of physical media as the most cost-effective means of obtaining it.

Somehow, I just can't see things like CDs and DVDs and Blu-Ray discs ever going away completely. Audio CDs may be relegated to niche markets, though, but video discs will always remain useful to plenty of mainstream consumers. (I'll concede that optical discs might eventually be replaced with some form of high-capacity flash media... but flash media is still physical media.)

Most cable operators are doing 250-300GB, which is plenty for some movies, online backups, downloads, normal use, etc. I think the caps are abhorrent, but in practical terms that aren't *that* bad.

I'm on a bandwidth constrained 650mhz Comcast system, and my usage is currently at 2,628GB this month, over 10 times my previous record, and I haven't heard a peep from them. It still tests at 62/12. They will eventually phase in their 300GB cap, so I'm going for broke building a several TB collection of stuff before they cap.

I think rental is the future. Blockbuster was huge back in the day, and that's the big market, not the purchasing. With the amount of content out there, and the relatively low cost of a rental compared to buying, it makes sense to rent, watch once, and move on.

Roku, Apple TV, and many other connected devices work just fine in the living room. They work just as well as, or better than, a Blu-Ray player. In fact, the UX on my Roku is exponentially better than my Blu-Ray player. I swear every DVD or Blu-ray player made in the past 5 years is junk. The remotes are terrible, the interfaces are slow as molasses. The Roku is just a dream to use, and can deliver Blu-Ray quality through VUDU HDX.

Just as things need more bandwidth, Cisco and gang are making connections that are ever faster. We'll see 10 gig fiber move to 40 gig move to 100 gig, and the bandwidth on the last mile on an HFC node move from 300mbps today to several gbps in the coming years.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ripster View Post

I've been in the music business for 40 years and have been quite surprised at the acceptance of the MP3. Although HD music has been introduced with CD like quality, the acceptance and availability is limited. It's interesting that with the onslaught of Beats and Premium headsets, a $50M market 5 years ago, now pressing the $900M mark, that folks wouldn't want quality. But not the case.

Digital audio got better. 256kbps AAC and 320kbps MP3 are equivalent to CDs, so digital won.
Quote:
Originally Posted by imagic View Post

No electricity but you're still going to be able to watch Blu-ray? I'm not sure you're right about that. I'm also curious how you "can take the physical media and use it in my iPad."

Some propane tanks and a 20kW generator will get the whole house cranking during a power outage. OTOH, there are other things to keep you entertained if you don't have something like FIOS that is not vulnerable to power issues. Like reading a book, or using your backup antenna to watch the new coverage of the event.
Quote:
Originally Posted by LewK View Post

But besides bandwidth from my ISP, there is the issue of bandwidth at the head end as well. There are times that I see the connection speed bouncing all over the place and that is usually due to the other end of the connection, not my end. I've hit servers that can't come close to feeding to me as fast as my ISP can get it to me.

...

And to those jerks who think that if you don't live on the east or west coast or at least in a major city with really high speed internet it's your own fault (at least that's the way you come across BiggAW), you might want to consider things a bit more carefully before insulting so many of the folks in the middle of the USA. Whether it's the farmers or the rest of us, you'd have a very hard time surviving without us. Besides, where would you get the Orville Redenbacher popcorn to eat during your movie!!! ;-D

A good CDN and a well built HFC network can handle a metric assload of bandwidth. We're talking multiple 4k HEVC streams per house.

I never said that everyone should move to the city for better broadband. What is annoying is when some poster says that a very small number of people will have access to streaming 4k, when in reality over half of the US will, even if the stream is 40mbps. Being in the middle has nothing to do with anything, there are rural areas virtually everywhere around the country that have horrible broadband options, even really slow (DSL), or heavily capped (like Verizon LTE). Broadband access is definitely a big problem that the current administration has paid a lot of lip service to, but really hasn't actually done anything about. I think that we should today treat 1gbps internet the same way that we treated phone lines in the 1950's- everyone in the US should have a 1gbps connection. Or at least a 25mbps connection to start off with.
Quote:
Originally Posted by blittler View Post

Gigabit is going to happen, and ISPs will be either falling all over themselves to compete, or get relegated to the forgotten morass of service providers that couldn't hack it. There will be less choice, and then more, but in the end it will balance out. So far that has been the case, anyway.

I hope so. Upgrade HFC plants will be able to do gigabit symmetrical with DOCSIS 3.1. What I worry is that cable has already pulled so far away from anything the telcos (outside of Verizon FIOS) can offer that they have no competition, so there's nothing to keep them moving. If many areas had a telco doing GPON fiber, and two cable companies, I think that things would be a lot better. I don't know of any that have three real competitors. Even here, where we have two cable providers, one (the local one) is a joke, and AT&T is a joke with U-Verse. Comcast is the only service that's decent.
post #412 of 920
Quote:
Originally Posted by comfynumb View Post


I haven't heard DSD downloads and I'm not sure what kind of CD's you have. I hear what your saying but I doubt there's a download they equals the quality of my MSFL, SACD and DVD-A media. Any download is more compressed than a red book CD and honestly I think their higher bit rates are all smoke and mirrors. I'll put my best CD's up against any download or my blu rays up against even the best download service which IMO is Vudu. They're getting closer but there really is no argument as to which is better. There are many that will never give up quality for convenience. I'll disagree with you about hearing the difference on a inferior setup, I can barely hear the difference on a revealing setup so you'll never hear it through some setups.


I want to add that I use some download services for music and videos and I do enjoy them.

I won't re-type your message, so I'll just say I agree.

 

MP3s and streaming is fine because it's like listening to the radio or watching TV ... but I can tell a difference between even 192-256 MP3 and my CDs or WAV files created from them. I'm also liking live concerts recorded in DD/AC3/DTS 5.1 ... and bitstream that to the AVR for direct decode like a movie.

 

I still have a large record collection, but don't concider any of the old analog formats any more. Mainly because they are lesser audio range and they degrade over time (no pops and hisses on a CD or DVD). I just put a new belt on my turntable and need to rip all the good albums I didn't re-buy on CD yet. All the optical disc formats are digital, always look/sound perfect, and are about as close as us normal people will ever get to the true master recording.

post #413 of 920
Physical media won't die for two reasons: people who want physical media and people who need physical media.

There will always be people who will want physical media. Case in point: vinyl. But arguable the larger reason is the people who need physical media. Not everyone has reliable access to go all digital. Maybe one day, it will be possible for everyone to go all digital, but until that day comes, the market for physical media will stay large enough that it cannot be ignored. Maybe it will soon change to where there is an initial run followed by a press-on-demand, but physical media will be around for some time.
post #414 of 920
Speaking purely for myself, I will continue using exclusively physical media for as long as possible. The main reason is that I refuse to support the pay-per-view level of control that streaming is tied to. The secondary reason is quality, which I don't expect to improve any time soon.

Third, I like the idea that once a physical copy has been released to the outside world, it is somewhat "static" and cannot be changed or altered after the fact. Two cases in point - "Blizzard of Ozz", which was re-mastered to remove the original bass player and drummer, and "Song of the South", which would never again see the light of day if it weren't for a handful of laserdisc copies (one of which I recently acquired). A streaming-only world would have consigned each of these to history's dustbin, while the release of physical media will allow them to live on.
post #415 of 920
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gradius2 View Post

I stopped using physical medias since 2007 now (converted almost all into HDDs). Keep in mind they (CD/DVD/Blu-ray) also won't last too long too.

CD-R last around 5 to 10 years (99% of them).
DVD-R is around 5 to 15 years (99% of them).
Blu-ray last 15 years and 30 years as max.

Blu-ray are still too new to really have a better data source on lifespan, but won't except over 30 years to be safer using them.

On HDD side you need to have a little RAID-5(0) or RAID-6(0) to be safer.

As for streaming, this will only be a true reality when we all have Optical cables for Internet with 1Gbps at least.

But to me RAID solution (until something better pops up) will be forever for my digital needs (audio, videos, movies, etc).

Source:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CD-R

Look @ Lifespan

What a misleading data. I started using CD-R in my studio back in 1989. The burner cost me $10K and the discs were $40 each. Each song was backed up from 2" Otari digital tape master to both DAT and CD-R. I have more than 100 CD-R during the first year alone and all of them, without exception, can be played with no problem.

I started using DVD-R when the machines were first released in 1999. To this day all of the discs are still playing with the exception of Memorex brand.

So they are 24 years and 14 years respectively with 100% playback rate.

Your MTBF and 99% failure rate is clearly bogus.

PS: not everything in Wikipedia is true, y'know.
post #416 of 920
its inevitable. Look at where cellular is going. Why even carry media when availability will be instant and everywhere. Sure, we want a physical copy to do as we wish with, but why? You don't need a backup. If you want to edit parts out, there will be capture technology just as there is now. And you can't say everyone won't have access. That's now, and that even changes everyday. Its like saying that we autonomously driving vehicles aren't coming when almost every new feature on vehicles in the last few years has been a function of a driverless system. Its inevitable.
post #417 of 920
As an Apple user , I can say that sadly the end was in sight about a year ago.

Do I agree with the demise of physical media , no of course not !!

I like to hold something ( now don`t get nasty LOL ) , and the idea and the whole adventure of buy a new cd or dvd is a good thing.

But facts are facts , it may not have been entirely Apple`s fault , but the first nail was driven in with the advent of the very first iPod.

And now we have "Smart TV`s" ( larger iPods !! ) and we have HULU / Netflix and dare I say , iTunes , and a whole host of others and even more that we have not even heard of yet.

Yes , the times of waiting in-line at midnight for your favorite new release , is all but gone.

That is the reality my friends , debate me or agree with me , it does not matter. I did not make the rules , but this is a new one that we will all follow or go without.

I wish you all a very nice day ! smile.gif

Gary 
post #418 of 920
Quote:
Originally Posted by rantanamo View Post

its inevitable. Look at where cellular is going. Why even carry media when availability will be instant and everywhere. Sure, we want a physical copy to do as we wish with, but why? You don't need a backup. If you want to edit parts out, there will be capture technology just as there is now. And you can't say everyone won't have access. That's now, and that even changes everyday. Its like saying that we autonomously driving vehicles aren't coming when almost every new feature on vehicles in the last few years has been a function of a driverless system. Its inevitable.

Yeah just look at what the carriers charge for data consumption I could only imagine downloading a couple of blue-ray quality movies a month rivaling a car note.
post #419 of 920
Quote:
Originally Posted by rantanamo View Post

but why?

For the many reasons already stated;

1. Company you 'buy' your digital copy from goes out of business, technology changes, you can no longer watch it or they want more money to watch it... aka, change the "rules".
2. Director releases new version (pulls a Lucas) and the version you adore is pulled and no longer available.
3. Unable to watch titles without an internet connection as well as authentication with the company authenticating your "approved" machine for playback.
4. Crappy playback, buffering, quality reduction issues (ala Netflix).
5. Unable to make a "backup" of the media in your collection for archival purposes.
6. Inability to loan/re-sell something that you paid for.
7. Inferior audio and video quality compared to the current state of the art with high definition audio and high bitrate 1080P video.
8. Special features (director commentaries, behind the scenes, "making of" featurettes, etc.
post #420 of 920
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lynx_TWO View Post

One more thing, if the movie industry could pull their collective heads out and release all their movies and tv shows to a couple different services like NetFlix, AND keep the thing commercial free AND keep costs at 7.99 a month, it would kill movie piracy overnight. Why would I buy a bluray for 20 or 30 bucks when I can download the 36GB ripped file for free in under a couple hours, or a 4GB further compressed version in minutes? Just saying...
Yaaaaaa, 36G is over 1/2 my monthly bandwidth, which was just recently raised to 70G/mo from 60G/mo, and even if I pulled it off bit-torrent, it would still be cheaper for me to buy a physical copy and save my bandwidth for something more useful. I only pull big stuff like that down if I can't actually buy it. I also get a max of 3Mbps...on a Wednesday night at 3am maybe. During regular day times I might see 1Mbps and if all the kiddies in the area are hitting the Netflix/XBox/MMO/etc at the same time I can see under 100Kbps. Games like Arkham City, which runs about 20G, would take me probably a week or more to download. That said, I chose to live in the country with all that clean air, privacy and no neighbors to be seen. What was I thinking. Physical media is alive and well and not going anywhere anytime soon, especially for those in rural areas. Why? The biggest reason is that the cable companies/telecoms will never give up the stranglehold they have on the Internet unless the government intervenes like what happened in parts of Europe.

I also laugh about those who tout 1Gbps Internet is coming...well I should certainly hope so. But in 5 years? This is kind of a sad statement when you think about 5 years away from Gbit Internet, when Europe has already moved on to 10Gbit Internet. They are so far ahead in Internet technology it just makes me sad. I talk to friends in Europe and they can't even comprehend how bad the Internet is over here.
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