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The retirement dream home theater - Page 2

post #31 of 368
19-22 dB would be quieter than the fan on the majority (if not all) projectors, on low bulb. As long as you don't mount it right next to your head, you shouldn't be able to hear it - based on specs anyway. The Mitsubishi Mr. Slim seems to be a popular choice among AVS theater builders (among those who use Mini Splits), maybe an owner of one will chime in with personal experience.
post #32 of 368
Thread Starter 
Thanks Brad i am thinking of going with your size screen
post #33 of 368
20dB is probably quieter than your projector. I have no experience with the ductless units, but they get good marks from most around here.
post #34 of 368
Thread Starter 
Thanks Fred maybe someone using them will chime in like Brad said
post #35 of 368
Erskine Group specifies NC20 for the HVAC system noise. Here is a reference for what that means in terms of SPL vs. Frequency curves.

http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/nc-noise-criterion-d_725.html
post #36 of 368
Thread Starter 
How does that relate to db
post #37 of 368
You need to find out what the measurement conditions were for the 20 dB quoted by the HVAC guy. It could be simply a Sound Pressure Level (SPL) measurement at a specific frequency, which would not be very useful. Noise Criteria (NC) is derived from measurements across the audio spectrum, and is a standardized specification.

If you look at the NC chart in the link, you see SPL (dB) on the left, and Frequency across the bottom. Pick a frequency, go up to the NC20 curve, and read out the corresponding dB level on the left.
post #38 of 368
Looked at the Mitsubishi Mr Slim specs. Their indoor evaporator units range from 19 dB (A) on low speed, to 49 dB(A) at high speed. The (A) means A-weighted, which is what you can measure with your Radio Shack SPL meter.

19 dB (A) is real quiet, 49 dB (A) would annoy me.

I am planning to use a ducted mini-split, so the fan unit will be outside the "soundproof" shell of the room.
post #39 of 368
Yeah I forgot I was going to mention that - if it was hot enough that you had to use something other than the lowest setting, it would be audible (and 49 would be very audible). But maybe manageable if the room was cooled off with the high setting in advance of use, and then set to low during the movie.
post #40 of 368
Thread Starter 
Brad that is what the guy said run it on high until the temp is where it belongs.

Lebon 49 is dishwasher loud
post #41 of 368
I agree that 49 dB is too loud. I had one of these in a small computer room, where it had to run on high in the summer, and it was very noticeable -- much too loud for a theatre.

That is why I am using the ducted version, to get the evaporator fan noise outside the soundproof envelope, using oversized flexble duct and registers.

My room will be about 20 x22 x 9.5, and will use a 12000 btu/hr ( 1 Ton) heat pump unit., with 2 10" diam supply ducts, and 2 10" return ducts. Climate here is very temperate, so it doesn't require a lot of tonnage.
post #42 of 368
Thread Starter 
Thanks guys I have to give it some thought
Edited by cw5billwade - 1/24/14 at 12:40pm
post #43 of 368
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeBon View Post

Erskine Group specifies NC20 for the HVAC system noise. Here is a reference for what that means in terms of SPL vs. Frequency curves.

http://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/nc-noise-criterion-d_725.html

It's actually NC20 for the room, with all mechanical systems in full operation including noise coming from the projector itself, but primarily from the HVAC and any outside noises getting in to the theater, such as street traffic, the outside condensing unit, etc.


Bill - they make ducted mini-split systems that locate all the noisy stuff from the system to outside the room. But I have to say....considering you are building new and the house is still in framing, why aren't you simply installing an appropriately sized standard HVAC system dedicated for this room instead of worrying about the noise of an in-room mini-split???? You would probably have to get a dual stage unit with a variable speed fan to get sufficient run times, but you'd have the overhead capacity ready to go for a packed theater in the middle of the hottest summer day.
Edited by TMcG - 4/29/13 at 1:21pm
post #44 of 368
I would stay away from the ductless or the mini-split system. We have those on a couple of buildings where I work to cool the telecom rooms. They are loud and the evaporator unit that is mounted inside the room leaks condensate every so often. The condensate reservoir is very small and if there is a lot of heat in that room, the reservoir will fill up and leak. Since you live in Georgia, I would suspect that it gets very humid in that part of the country. If the area you live in has high humidity, you are going to need a system that will easily cool the space while you and your family are enjoying a movie. Remember, the human body produces a lot of BTU’s of heat. There are HVAC systems called self contained or package air conditioners. These are a self contained AC or heat pump system with connections for supply and return duct work. The unit is mounted outside and the duct work is run outside to the conditioned space. So, all you see inside is the supply and return registers. There is no sound, no leaks, and is easy to work on. There is no fan, no evaporator coil inside the space. Trane, Goodman, Lennox, and York all make package system. I would check into this kind of system. They are the same price and the best part is, they come ready to run. They come with a full charge of R410a and easy to install.


Here is a link to Goodman to show you what I am talking about. Now, This may be waaaay to much cooling for what you want, but I am just trying to show you what I am talking about. I think they make smaller units, you will just have to ask around. I have seen many home owners have these installed. Down in Arizona and Nevada, these are mostly mounted on the roof of most residential homes because it gets so hot down there.

http://www.goodmanmfg.com/CommercialProducts/PackagedUnits/tabid/1265/Default.aspx
post #45 of 368
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeBlow74 View Post

I would stay away from the ductless or the mini-split system. We have those on a couple of buildings where I work to cool the telecom rooms. They are loud and the evaporator unit that is mounted inside the room leaks condensate every so often. The condensate reservoir is very small and if there is a lot of heat in that room, the reservoir will fill up and leak. Since you live in Georgia, I would suspect that it gets very humid in that part of the country. If the area you live in has high humidity, you are going to need a system that will easily cool the space while you and your family are enjoying a movie. Remember, the human body produces a lot of BTU’s of heat. There are HVAC systems called self contained or package air conditioners. These are a self contained AC or heat pump system with connections for supply and return duct work. The unit is mounted outside and the duct work is run outside to the conditioned space. So, all you see inside is the supply and return registers. There is no sound, no leaks, and is easy to work on. There is no fan, no evaporator coil inside the space. Trane, Goodman, Lennox, and York all make package system. I would check into this kind of system. They are the same price and the best part is, they come ready to run. They come with a full charge of R410a and easy to install.


Here is a link to Goodman to show you what I am talking about. Now, This may be waaaay to much cooling for what you want, but I am just trying to show you what I am talking about. I think they make smaller units, you will just have to ask around. I have seen many home owners have these installed. Down in Arizona and Nevada, these are mostly mounted on the roof of most residential homes because it gets so hot down there.

http://www.goodmanmfg.com/CommercialProducts/PackagedUnits/tabid/1265/Default.aspx

A ducted system if properly designed and installed can be better. A minisplit is probably cheaper though and they are easier to get in small capacities. Condensate should not go to an internal reservoir, it should be routed to an external drain. The cheap units are noisy but not the good ones from Fujitsu, Daikin, Mitsubishi.
post #46 of 368
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brad Horstkotte View Post

19-22 dB would be quieter than the fan on the majority (if not all) projectors, on low bulb. As long as you don't mount it right next to your head, you shouldn't be able to hear it - based on specs anyway. The Mitsubishi Mr. Slim seems to be a popular choice among AVS theater builders (among those who use Mini Splits), maybe an owner of one will chime in with personal experience.

I have a Mr. Slim. Yes you can hear it but it is super quiet and once a movie is on inaudible. My SIM2 projector is way louder.
post #47 of 368
Mitubishi has a ducted option for their Mr. Slim split units, also. That's what is spec'd in my planned room. The evaporator/fan unit SPL is spec'd at 23 dB(A) on low speed, and 33 dB(A) on hi speed. But you put that outside the room, so it should work fine.
post #48 of 368
Quote:
Originally Posted by LeBon View Post

Mitubishi has a ducted option for their Mr. Slim split units, also. That's what is spec'd in my planned room. The evaporator/fan unit SPL is spec'd at 23 dB(A) on low speed, and 33 dB(A) on hi speed. But you put that outside the room, so it should work fine.

Yes they do, and if you do it that way you can also include fresh air into the system. The in room mini-splits, you can't do that, and if your room is sealed up there isn't much air moving in and out!
post #49 of 368
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nyal Mellor View Post

Yes they do, and if you do it that way you can also include fresh air into the system. The in room mini-splits, you can't do that, and if your room is sealed up there isn't much air moving in and out!
how do you introduce fresh air that way?
post #50 of 368
There is a fresh-air intake port on the return side of the air handler. You also need a stale air exhaust to balance the pressure in the room. In my case, I am using to equipment closet exhaust to provide this function.
post #51 of 368
Thread Starter 
This is what HAVAC guy installed 4 eight inch supplies they will put in a 10 inch return. My plan is once inspections are done to run them in my soffits.
Front
20130504_151500.jpg
Center
20130504_151507.jpg
Edited by cw5billwade - 1/24/14 at 12:52pm
post #52 of 368
Thread Starter 
My builder said go ahead and start on my theater so we did. Today we started puting in extra framing for the clips.
This is my friend Scott siting on riser
20130504_151420.jpg
Me
20130504_151433.jpg
Edited by cw5billwade - 5/4/13 at 7:11pm
post #53 of 368
Thread Starter 
Scott reframed my media rack. There was not a level or straight piece of wood on it when framers did it.
20130504_151640.jpg
Standing on riser behind chairs
20130504_151526.jpg
From billard room
20130504_151551.jpg
post #54 of 368
Nice! everything is looking colossal!
post #55 of 368
Subscribed, should be a fun thread.
post #56 of 368
Thread Starter 
Will get some more pics up later today. Rigt now I can only woork on weekend so aa no to get in way of house build
post #57 of 368
Thread Starter 
Progress on house
20130502_123655.jpg
post #58 of 368
Is the house the mirror image of the plans you posted? or am I confused and looking at the back?
post #59 of 368
Thread Starter 
Yes we told architect to reverse but he forgot. Ok though framers can read upsidedown
Edited by cw5billwade - 1/24/14 at 12:54pm
post #60 of 368
Thread Starter 
Using a few tubes of this while Scott is doing nailers for clips
20130505_114741.jpg
This is in the garage where shop ceiling which is lowered 12 inches for front of theater
20130505_114806.jpg
Edited by cw5billwade - 5/5/13 at 6:36pm
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