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Wiring for 220vac

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
I've wired a few circuits, but i'm curious what the plug would look like a on a 220vac pro amp. most 220vac plugs were four prong with two hot one common and an earth ground....

KG
post #2 of 19
All of the 220v plugs I have ever seen are four prong. If you have true 220v receptacle, you can change the plug or receptacle out if they do not match up. They sell those at home depot.
post #3 of 19
^
Yes. Just plan your outlet according to the current draw and match the two. I use the twist lock outlets/plugs (L6-20P 3 prong 20amp 250v) generator plugs.
post #4 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by kgveteran View Post

I've wired a few circuits, but i'm curious what the plug would look like a on a 220vac pro amp.
That depends on the current capacity. To be safe wait until you get the amp, then you can match the plug on the cord to the correct outlet.
post #5 of 19
Thread Starter 
Can any amp be run on 220 ? I use the four prong on my 220 generator, it has a twist lock. Most amps have the removable power cord with just three contacts in it. At least my QSC 1450's have only three contacts, i never checked to see if it has a voltage dip switch.
post #6 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by kgveteran View Post

Can any amp be run on 220 ? I use the four prong on my 220 generator, it has a twist lock. Most amps have the removable power cord with just three contacts in it. At least my QSC 1450's have only three contacts, i never checked to see if it has a voltage dip switch.

No, and I dont know why some amps would have 4 prong and some would have 3 but the LG clones are wired with 3 prong in my application.
post #7 of 19
Hi KG,
Quote:
Originally Posted by kgveteran View Post

I've wired a few circuits, but i'm curious what the plug would look like a on a 220vac pro amp. most 220vac plugs were four prong with two hot one common and an earth ground....
Yes, the majority of 220volt circuits use a four-prong Hubble connector, but there are three prong 220volt connectors, for when the device doesn't need a neutral connection. The device would normally have an IEC connector on it.

I assume the reason for your question is that you need to wire a circuit for the amp? I suspect the amp will come with an IEC connector at the back, and the best connector for the wall might be this and this.
post #8 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkHotchkiss View Post

I suspect the amp will come with an IEC connector at the back.
It would be the rare amp that didn't come with a cord, so he should just wait until he receives it, unless the amp data sheet at the manufacturer website specifies the outlet required.
post #9 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by kgveteran View Post

Can any amp be run on 220 ?

Just the ones that are specified to be able to run on 220 volts. How long did you think before you typed that question? ;-)
Quote:
I use the four prong on my 220 generator, it has a twist lock.

That's all good because some 220 volt appliances need a neutral wire to operate properly.
Quote:
Most amps have the removable power cord with just three contacts in it. At least my QSC 1450's have only three contacts,

That's because most power amps that run off of 208-250 volts don't need a neutral connection.

A 4 prong plug for 220-type situations will have connections for the two hots, a neutral and a safety ground.

A 3 prong plug for 220-type situations will have connections for the two hots, an a safety ground. It will drop the neutral, which is generally not needed.

But there are a few exceptions to the rule of neutral being optional - devices that need a neutral such as dryers with 220 volt heating elements but 120 volt motors and control circuits.

Quote:
I never checked to see if it has a voltage dip switch.

Duuuuh!

BTW ever have the urge to read a QSC 1450 user manual for yourself?

http://www.qscaudio.com/support/technical_support/user_manuals.php


Executive summary:

Usually it takes a lot more than a dip switch to make a power amp run at both 120 and 240 volts. There are often two different models of the product, one for each power line voltage.

Some modern equipment uses switchmode power supplies that take thee exact opposite tack - they simply automatically adapt to whatever power you supply, over a fairly broad range. The RMX 1450 is not among them, but some competitive amps (e.g. Crown iTX series) do.
post #10 of 19
My crowns are universal supplies, which adapt to any world voltage automatically, if I recall correctly the 240v connectors have both hot blade at 90 degrees with a ground, but no neutral.
post #11 of 19
Thread Starter 
Since the ground and common are both connected to the same rail in my breaker box i always saw it as duplicative
post #12 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by kgveteran View Post

Since the ground and common are both connected to the same rail in my breaker box i always saw it as duplicative

Some do use the term common, but rarely.

A brief overview;
There's a Hot, a Neutral, and a Ground. In a typical residential panel-board, there's two hots, a neutral and a ground.

The hot is often called a phase, or a line. Typically it's black, in three phase systems there's color coding of black, red, blue, and brown, orange, yellow, depending on system voltage.

The neutral is a grounded conductor.

The ground is the grounding conductor, often called safety ground, or earth.



KG, this is for anyone interested, I know you're quite savvy. Some do use the terms incorrectly ..
post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by FOH View Post

Some do use the term common, but rarely.

A brief overview;
There's a Hot, a Neutral, and a Ground. In a typical residential panel-board, there's two hots, a neutral and a ground.

The hot is often called a phase, or a line. Typically it's black, in three phase systems there's color coding of black, red, blue, and brown, orange, yellow, depending on system voltage.

The neutral is a grounded conductor.

The ground is the grounding conductor, often called safety ground, or earth.



KG, this is for anyone interested, I know you're quite savvy. Some do use the terms incorrectly ..

So from now on "neutral" is the term, gotcha. While we are at it, what speaker is your avatar ?
post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by BassThatHz View Post

if I recall correctly the 240v connectors have both hot blade at 90 degrees with a ground, but no neutral.
My first thought was 90* away from the ground, thinking of some crazy four phase design, but using only two of the four phases...then I realized you were talking about the physical structure of the plug. You should of seen my face eek.gif
post #15 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Looneybomber View Post

My first thought was 90* away from the ground, thinking of some crazy four phase design, but using only two of the four phases...then I realized you were talking about the physical structure of the plug. You should of seen my face eek.gif

In higher power, polyphase could mean more than 3 phases. Some systems have up to 12. cool.gif
post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Looneybomber View Post

My first thought was 90* away from the ground, thinking of some crazy four phase design, but using only two of the four phases...then I realized you were talking about the physical structure of the plug. You should of seen my face eek.gif

The phase of the sinewaves of the hot wires ARE at 90 degrees from ground also, coincidently... one at +90 and the other at -90 degrees at 120v, hence forming 180 degrees apart and 240volts.
wink.gif
post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by yelnatsch517 View Post

In higher power, polyphase could mean more than 3 phases. Some systems have up to 12. cool.gif
I've heard of 3 and 6. We've only talked about 3 phase in class (along with the wye/delta, leading/lagging stuff.) 12 phase!? I think somebody is compensating for something...
Quote:
Originally Posted by BassThatHz View Post

The phase of the sinewaves of the hot wires ARE at 90 degrees from ground also, coincidently... one at +90 and the other at -90 degrees at 120v, hence forming 180 degrees apart and 240volts.
wink.gif
Are you sh tting me? 240v is essentially a pos and neg 120v source? I was under the impression it was a straight on single cosine wave of 240v, where-as 240V 3 phase was 3, 240v sources 120* apart.

Wait it makes sense, that way you can have one 240 line that is two 120's out of phase. That way there's no need to use a transformer at the house to step down to 120V. Never thought of that before!
post #18 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by kgveteran View Post

While we are at it, what speaker is your avatar ?

JBL 4350

post #19 of 19
Single phase residential power, and 3 phase commercial/industrial systems do create confusion.


The 240 service at your home, with two hot legs, are derived from one leg of a 3phase system possessing 120 degrees of displacement between phases (because the generating source at the power house generates in this fashion).

So discussing degrees associated with residential single phase services can easily tend to obfuscate the situation, when it's more akin to a polarity scenario.

A residential system, the two legs are derived .... by center tapping the 240 volt leg, creating a neutral point there. Now you still have the 240 capability across both ends (for any 240 needs in the home), yet you also have the two legs of 120 volts each.



Hope this helps
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