or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

"Hallway" Theater - Page 2

post #31 of 80
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by jedimastergrant View Post

I bet Nyals advice on the doors is worth looking at. The solid core is great and now you should look at the zero int seals. They would probably blow your budget but just so you understand that will be your weak point and should be a focus rather than equal impedance concerns.

I already purchased the doors; I spent $363.92 on 2 doors. I mentioned this in an earlier post. Although I didn't notice until recently that people are recommending "slab doors" without panels so there is no diminished thickness. Oh well. The doors came in on Tuesday, and I went and picked them up. They are heavy.

Budget Update:
+363.92 [ 2 1.75" Solid Core pre-hung doors with seals and adjustable thresholds.]
363.92 [total spent]
post #32 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by djkest View Post

I'm not a plumber, but it seems like a huge ripoff. We are talking 3 hours tops and minimal parts cost. Should be more like $200-250 IMO. I just priced out if I used the sharkbite fittings and 25' of additional pex, I could do the whole thing under $100 but like I said, that main line makes me nervous, and I'm also uncertain as to what the effect would be of putting couplings and/or 90 degree elbows in terms of flow/pressure.

Any comments on the plumber's cost? He said the estimate is 2 licensed and certified plumbers for 3 hours.

ETA: I think I can do the plumbing stuff myself. It's the gas line that I am afraid of. Calling some plumbing companies to get estimates on that as well.


thanks for the tip on the ducts! I'm in paralysis as to whether to replace my 3 supply lines or not.

just in case: the sharkbite fittings- For peace of mind, I'd let the plumber do the connections- my plumber used pex barb connectors and crimps which also appeared super easy to do, just need the crimping tool. As for the push fit connectors- I'm not sure if code allows those inside of walls. I think they need to be accessible... just making sure you use the barb type.

here's what I'm talking about: http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/catalog/servlet/ContentView?pn=KH_PL_SharkBite&storeId=10051&langId=-1&catalogId=10053

better safe than sorry. smile.gif
post #33 of 80
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Swervepf View Post

thanks for the tip on the ducts! I'm in paralysis as to whether to replace my 3 supply lines or not.

just in case: the sharkbite fittings- For peace of mind, I'd let the plumber do the connections- my plumber used pex barb connectors and crimps which also appeared super easy to do, just need the crimping tool. As for the push fit connectors- I'm not sure if code allows those inside of walls. I think they need to be accessible... just making sure you use the barb type.

here's what I'm talking about: http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/catalog/servlet/ContentView?pn=KH_PL_SharkBite&storeId=10051&langId=-1&catalogId=10053

better safe than sorry. smile.gif

Sharkbite fittings are [supposedly] acceptable for in-wall use. The only real drawback to them is cost, which is more than any other type of fitting. But they require less tools.

Last night I spent a couple hours clearing out the theater area, sweeping, knocking out a bunch of those punch-outs in the floor joists, and moving the doors up against the wall. I also drained all the water out my my sprinkler line, which was quite easy. I'm excited that TODAY hopefully we are getting started on this project.
Edited by djkest - 5/15/13 at 9:24am
post #34 of 80
Thread Starter 
Well now I am super-discouraged. Everything sucks. Had a plumbing/HVAC guy here for about 90 minutes and he said basically everything should be redone and it's going to cost me. In addition my heating vents in that room he says should be routed across the ceiling to the other side. Wants to use flexible gas line to run the gas but says it's a ~$250 piece. So at this point I don't know what to do. I am thinking about just cancelling this project because it's obviously going to take more time and money than I thought.

I am going to have to call off my framing guy tomorrow until I can get this all straightened out. Or we could just run soffits around everything and make drywalling a nightmare.

1) Gas line COULD be moved, but it will cost me probably $300
2) Digging up the main water line is beyond the scope of anything I've ever done before. Said the water meter could be moved to that location if I wanted. This part is optional.
3) This stupid return duct is sticking 2' into my room and doesn't even need to be there. I think I'll pay him to hack the excess off. Cost about $75, money well spent IMO.




ETA: Budget has been officially increased by $500 to $5500. We should be able to pay the plumber to fix all the problems.
Edited by djkest - 5/10/13 at 8:44pm
post #35 of 80
You sound like most of us. Don't be discouraged. Persevere and you'll see it will have been worth it.

It takes tons of time (I demo'd last August!) and some money.

Just had a thought about your plumbing being attached to the underside of the joists... Clips (whisper clips and genie clips) and hat channel will give you a 1 5/8" gap between the joist and the drywall and you typically install it perpendicular to the joists, so parallel to the water lines... Maybe you could leave the water, and potentially gas, where it is? Instead of paying the plumber, spend it on the clips and hat channel. You would then of course have to be careful not to miss the hat channels and then pierce water lines when installing your drywall ceilings to the channels.

Can anyone advise if this is a bad idea? The water lines would be "safer" up in the joists, yes, but is this a NO GO? Disclaimer: I'm not a pro! Just an enthusiastic (and sometimes also discouraged) DIY'er who had an idea.

HVAC return- I had the same problem. I popped off the end cap, cut of the excess ~6" length with a cutoff wheel on a dremel and put the cap back on. Took 20 minutes and I got rid of a bump out to achieve a flat wall in that spot. DIY!
post #36 of 80
yah I'll second that - take a couple days to NOT think about it and then come back with a fresh perspective. Frustration clouds judgment.
post #37 of 80
Why not rotate the room ninety degrees, borrow the projector for a trial run, and consider an DIY Seymourav screen on the sump pump end wall.

ht room.jpg 143k .jpg file

As for the soffit, why not frame a two step soffit that will hide the gas line and the water lines (untouched)? Saves budget and adds detailing.

The window is going to be your weak spot, so unless you are doing a plug for it, I wouldn't go to extremes, or worry about RISC clips.
post #38 of 80
Thread Starter 
Hey, that looks really nice. I would be all for it, just have to run it by the wife. I guess the AT screen and PJ like that hadn't quite crossed my mind. makes me think a matching cosmetic soffit on the other side would be cool. And yes we are making a plug for the window.

Update 1: Friend sold his projector, so I don't have access to a loaner unit anymore. It's a bummer, he sold it for $200 on craigslist about a week after he said I could have it.

Update 2: Framer guy worked for about 6 hours yesterday, doing what he could before the gas line is moved. He also owns a concrete saw so I may have him remove the concrete in the corner of the basement so we can dig up and reroute the main line. He also has a sawzall with a metal blade so I asked him to hack the end off my return line, which he didn't do since I wasn't there to cap it.
I paid him for all the materials and about half the labor, he is coming in 1 week to finish the job. This guy does great work and is quite the character.

Update 3: The framing guy suggested that I build a recessed equipment cabinet to house my electronics. I am seriously considering this. I can tuck it in under the staircase and then get a custom piece of glass cut for a door.

Budget Update:

+ $500 Framing materials and partial labor for framing. ($338 for materials cost)
$863.92
Edited by djkest - 5/12/13 at 7:01am
post #39 of 80
Thread Starter 
Progress Update:
Framing guy got about 1/2 of the framing done. I asked him to hold off until I get the plumbing and HVAC sorted out. Might have all the framing done as early as this coming Saturday. The odor of PL premium construction adhesive is still pretty strong. I am impressed with his work so far. A little disappointed that pressure treated lumber wasn't used on the floor, apparently it's not code required anymore but the cost difference is trivial and therefore worthwhile in my opinion.






Daddy's little helper


Went shopping at Home Depot. Got Fiberglass insulation, 350' electrical wiring, other electrical stuff, 6 can lights, 6 baffles, 2 doorknobs, and 7 lbs of various types of drywall screws. I actually saved a bit of money on the lighting and electrical stuff as compared to what I had budgeted. I'll run the numbers and see where I'm at.

ETA:
2 hours with tin snips, not fun at all. This was a pain. I made a mark on the other duct with a sharpie so you can see where it used to extend to. This was so worthwhile.

Temporarily held in place with some Gorilla Tape, which will probably "work" until we are ready to actually frame it off.

Budget update:
+514.60 Home Depot (electrical, insulation, misc)
$1351.52
Edited by djkest - 5/15/13 at 8:45am
post #40 of 80
Thread Starter 
Okay as to re-orienting the room, wife said no again to that idea. The real problem is that this room is in fact also a hallway, which leads to the rest of the basement and the laundry room. I always knew this room would be somewhat of a compromise. The upside I suppose is that the surround speakers will have proper distance and spacing but then the rear speakers will be really close. With a seating distance to screen of 8-9.5', a smaller screen will in fact be just as "large" as a larger screen further away. We will not be able to have a 2nd row, but we can have some bean bags or kids chairs for in front for the kiddos, and then fit 4 across comfortably in the prime listening area.

Budget Update:
Purchased 3 Cases of Green Glue, a bunch of IB-1 clips, and 1/2 case of Acoustic Sealant. Shipping was costly but necessary.

+648.35 [Soundproofing Company]
$1999.87

Have a lot of the materials already. On track for the new expanded budget.

The plan keeps changing, but I like this one, anyone have comments?

Based on our viewing distance, a 92" screen would be similar in viewing angle to an IMAX screen! I have a plan I may be able to come up with enough money to purchase a projector after all. I have almost $500 in my fund already. A ~90" projection screen would be leaps and bounds better than a 46" LED TV.



Possibly looking at this screen: Any comments?
http://www.amazon.com/Elite-Screens-ER92WH1-Projection-Screen/dp/B00366MBAC/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1368632898&sr=8-4&keywords=elite+screens+fixed+frame
Edited by djkest - 5/15/13 at 8:52am
post #41 of 80
Thread Starter 
Whoo hoo! Well I am very encouraged by my (our) work today. We successfully removed the concrete in the corner of the basement without damaging the main water line. I dug out 16 gallons of moist sandy dirt all the way to the footing and down at least 2'. I am holding off bending the main water pipe until I figure out exactly where I want it. Used a concrete saw to make 2 big cuts and 1 small cut on a corner, and then I smashed it apart with a 5 lb sledgehammer. It as actually easier than I thought it would be, and we did it in about an hour.

In the meantime I am having some plumber problems. My chosen plumber is being slow to return my calls and I'm not sure if he really wants to do this job or not. I have another plumber I can fall back on who already gave me an estimate. I may have to hold off my framer AGAIN, luckily he's a real cool guy and he's good about communicating.

Anyway, PICS

Before:

After:




And this that I've been working on. This is if we purchase a PJ, screen, and 4-person reclining chair/loveseat combo.



For VENTILATION, I am looking at venting to the adjacent room instead of into the returns. Code requires 0.35 exchanges per hour, which isn't much. At Home Depot I found a 110 CFM fan that is rated at like 1.2 sonnes. 110 CFM / 1600 cubic feet = ~4 exchanges per hour.
Edited by djkest - 5/16/13 at 8:13am
post #42 of 80
Definitely go the projector route. With the price of projectors you cant beat it. I started with an 84" screen and now have moved up to the 120" version of the elite screen you posted. I havent used it yet (still waiting on my Epson 3020 to arrive) but it was easy to install and looks good so far.
post #43 of 80
Thread Starter 
Even if I don't buy a projector, I will run some grey conduit in the ceiling so I can run ethernet, HDMI, whatever if I change my mind. Maybe I'll throw up some OSB too for mounting.
post #44 of 80
Thread Starter 
Oh goody. I started to measure out and snap chalk lines on the ceiling joists for the IB1 clips and guess what. My joists are 19" O.C. So, I can't use the 16" or 24" pattern. This crap makes no sense. So I am going to be woefully short of clips doing it the way I was, they are basically 6" from all the edges and then 38" O.C. instead of 48". Stronger for sure, but uses more clips. Or I could put nailers for every single clip. Hmm... doesn't seem very likely.
post #45 of 80
Call Ted and John about the clip spacing. There might be easy solutions you wouldn't see coming.

While you're refiguring the ceiling issues, confirm that your drywall will be the traditional heavy stuff, NOT Sheetrock brand ultralight type X. Ask me how I learned about that...
post #46 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by HopefulFred View Post

confirm that your drywall will be the traditional heavy stuff, NOT Sheetrock brand ultralight type X. Ask me how I learned about that...

what's odd is that weight of drywall seems to vary across manufacturers... 5/8" Sheetrock is 2.2lbs/sq ft while ProRoc is 2.3lbs...

http://www.usg.com/rc/data-submittal-sheets/panels/sheetrock/sheetrock-gypsum-panels-regular-firecode-cores-submittal-WB1473.pdf

http://www.certainteed.com/Products/313675
post #47 of 80
Good luck with your budget... I started out with a budget and exceeded it big time. There are so many cool items out there that will catch your eye. Stay disciplined my friend, lord knows I didnt. biggrin.gif
post #48 of 80
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYGIANTSFAN23 View Post

Good luck with your budget... I started out with a budget and exceeded it big time. There are so many cool items out there that will catch your eye. Stay disciplined my friend, lord knows I didnt. biggrin.gif

Thanks man! We'll see how it goes. I just used up a tube of acoustic sealant on the gaps in the subfloor. Wow, that was really messy. Note to self, applying acoustic sealant over your head is messy business.

I also snapped out some more chalk lines and screwed in 25 of the OB-1 clips. I'm trying to visualize where every single clip will go and how the sheets of drywall will come together. They say that you need screws that have at least 110 lbs of pull-out strength. The SPAX screws I am using are rated for 600 lbs; and I'm screwing them in with an impact driver.

Plumber finally scheduled for Tuesday; framer guy is going to finish up Wed and Thursday nights. So after that we'll be moving right along to electrical.
Speaking of electrical, when we were using the concrete saw, we popped the breaker quite a few times. And now one of my circuits isn't working. I can't figure it out, I triple checked the breaker and reset all the GFI outlets in the house. There is one GFI that isn't working, I replaced it, still isn't working. Is it possible to fry a breaker in your main panel?
post #49 of 80
Quote:
Is it possible to fry a breaker in your main panel?

I beleive it is. I'm pretty sure they are spring loaded and over time can start pop fro apparently no reason at all. It's cheap enough (and easy enough) to replace, so I'd give it a go.
post #50 of 80
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tlogan6797 View Post

I beleive it is. I'm pretty sure they are spring loaded and over time can start pop fro apparently no reason at all. It's cheap enough (and easy enough) to replace, so I'd give it a go.

Just a mini-update. I used a multimeter to check all my breakers. Turns out one of the breakers (not the one I suspected) was indeed bad. I switched off the main panel and replaced it with a new 15A breaker that cost me a whopping $4.50 and now the electrical problem is fixed. I am going to return the GFI outlet that I bought for $16 now.
post #51 of 80
Glad it worked! Just don't rely on my typing ability! Oh, and be sure and tell my wife that I was right! She never believes anything I say.
post #52 of 80
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tlogan6797 View Post

Glad it worked! Just don't rely on my typing ability! Oh, and be sure and tell my wife that I was right! She never believes anything I say.

I watched a very informative Youtube video that was invaluable in helping me do it safely. Basically you pull the front off the panel and start checking all your output voltages with a DMM until you find one that isn't 120V, that indicated either a tripped breaker or a bad breaker. After you switch the main panel off, you go back and check a bunch of spots to make sure your voltage is off. I guess it's pretty basic stuff but still important.

I got a ton of stuff done today; I built 5 backer boxes and cut wood for the 6th. We got all the plumbing moved. Got the HVAC return air appropriately sealed. Got the excavated area filled and packed down, put ~5" concrete slab down. I really would like to go take pics but I am completely exhausted right now. Tomorrow.

Budget Update:
+$570.00 (Plumbing and gas work)
$2569.87 / $5500.00 (currently under the new budget, snicker)
post #53 of 80
Thread Starter 
This is what it looked like before:

After:



You can kind of see where the gas line came out before. About 18 out from there and 6" down.






A Small but very high quality shutoff valve near where it comes out of the slab.

Here's where all the money went for the plumbing. They also fixed the landing area. I did the concrete replacement myself for free. My friend gave me 480 lbs of Quickrete and I mixed it all by hand in a 5-gallon bucket. BTW don't do that.

Since they cut larger holes for the cold water lines, I am going to "sister" up the joist spans where I removed the circular plugs with some OSB scraps to make sure I'm not losing too much strength.
Edited by djkest - 5/22/13 at 9:53pm
post #54 of 80
Thread Starter 
And here's some more.

Lots of framing around the Furnace and ducts.


This is looking from the doorway in.

It's amazing, now that the wall is in on the other side, it's starting to feel like a real room. The plumbing mods were expensive but I think in the long run it will be worth it.

The wiring is all over the place still, but I'll be dealing with that later.

ETA1: Talking to my framer guy, he's really a wealth of information. He told me that I should contact an insulation supply house because they have special insulation that I can use with my 19" OC floor joists, and it will probably be cheaper as well.

ETA2: Really liking this idea. Thinking about doing a strip hidden in a piece of crown molding across the front of the room:
http://www.amazon.com/LEDwholesalers-Controller-2034RGB-3315-3215/dp/B0040FJ27S/ref=sr_1_fkmr0_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1369316455&sr=8-1-fkmr0&keywords=phillips+color+led+strip#productDetails
Edited by djkest - 5/23/13 at 6:46am
post #55 of 80
Thread Starter 
Okay, so made some more progress yesterday and today so here are pics.

Framing is DONE! Doors are IN!

Wide angle shot from the West door.


I drilled a new hole in the side of my house and re-routed the plumbing so I could lower the corner shelf 8" and make it flush with the bookshelf area.
Took me about an hour and getting rid of all the old nails without tearing up the wood and making a mess of things.




A look to the other side.

I also made some purchases today so I need to update the budget! It's starting to look a little scary but manageable.

Budget Update:
+$300 Labor, framing, doors, and concrete cutting
+$90.80 216 SQFT of 19" x 48" R19 unfaced insulation
+$36.16 12 x 12' 7/8" 25 gauge hat channel (probably more than I need)
2996.83

I do have about $80 worth of stuff to return to Home Depot that will come back to the budget.

I have a couple little things I want to do, need to do some HVAC stuff, and start on the electrical work.

I also did some more measuring.
Length is 17' 9" from wall to wall, or 18'5" from the back of the "bookcase" to the far wall. Subtract 2.5" from both of those for drywall.
Height under soffit is 7'1/8", so I should be able to have 6'11" of clearance with drywall; so even with carpet I will meet my minimum height requirement of 6'8". Also there will be 1.5" of clearance from the bottom of the soffit to the top of the door, which doesn't sound like much but it's fine.
Quote:
Originally Posted by HopefulFred View Post

While you're refiguring the ceiling issues, confirm that your drywall will be the traditional heavy stuff, NOT Sheetrock brand ultralight type X. Ask me how I learned about that...

I talked to the drywall company yesterday and they confirmed they have:
Lightweight 5/8"
"Heavy" Fireblock 5/8" that is 70-72 lbs/ sheet
I got the prices on the heavy 5/8" and it's only $9.53/sheet which is ... cheap!
Edited by djkest - 5/25/13 at 9:32am
post #56 of 80
Thread Starter 
Took advantage of some sales this weekend and got my 10% off Veteran's discount on a few things at the big box stores.

Budget Update:
-72.04 Returned the R-19 insulation and a switchplate to HD
+63.28 6 pieces of Galvanized sheet metal HVAC parts to make 2 runs
2988.07

I also bought 6 Gallons of Valspar Signature but I need to calculate the exact cost. I think it's going to come out ot $27/gallon with tax after rebate. 6 Gallons should be plenty.


And now my HVAC and Electrical stuff needs to get going.
I am going to cut 2 supply lines for the theater room. I have the ridgid 6" ducting right now but I know they make flexable/insulated duct and some people like that. The HVAC guys I talked to hated it because it didn't flow as well as the ridgid pipe. The cost- it's actually cheaper by a couple bucks.

This is what I have for electrical so far. Ignoring speaker wire for the time being.


Switch on the left controls the 6 can lights
Switch on the right controls the 6 can lights with a dimmer and has another switch for the bookshelf lights.

15A circuit for the Lights and outlets
20A circuit for the equipment outlets.

Also been spending a ton of time on the backer boxes. Making the wood part was really easy with a table saw and air nailer. Cutting and gluing in the cemend board is taking much more time, esp since green glue isn't actually much of a glue...
1 Backer box complete, 5 backer boxes in various states of completeness. Wish I had a table saw for backer board.
post #57 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by djkest View Post

Wish I had a table saw for backer board.

To cut backer board, I rigged up a little jig with a fence for my circular saw made out of scrap lumber and OSB. I used a cheap masonry blade on the saw. It seemed to work well for getting consistent sized pieces cut. Don't forget to wear eye/lung protection, and do it outside.
post #58 of 80
Quote:
Originally Posted by djkest View Post

I also bought 6 Gallons of Valspar Signature but I need to calculate the exact cost. I think it's going to come out ot $27/gallon with tax after rebate. 6 Gallons should be plenty.
What are you painting? 6 gallons seems like a lot.
post #59 of 80
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by blipszyc View Post

What are you painting? 6 gallons seems like a lot.

Lets see. The walls and the ceiling. 400 sqft of walls and 208 sqft of ceiling. I figure we'll need at least 2 coats of every wall.

I also remembered that I need to figure out how I'm going to wire in an outlet for the PJ location.

ETA:
"Free" Stuff I am managing to use for this project
50' of 14-3 wire ; used for the traveler on my 3-way switch (from a friend)
6 bags of Quickrete, 80 lbs (from a friend)
2 full sheets of 1/4" Hardibacker, left over from a tile project
2 Sheets of OSB- 1 left over from the framer, 1 left over from previous projects
3/4" Plywood- enough to make the nailers for the backer boxes- left over from previous projects.

Other HVAC issues I'll need to figure out:
Need some airflow for the proposed AV cabinet
Need some airflow for the dead vent I'm planning- either inline fan or bathroom fan.
Edited by djkest - 6/10/13 at 7:58am
post #60 of 80
Thread Starter 
Forum Question: For some reason I can't see the image upload tools anymore. Have I reached some sort of limit?

HVAC:

So I am going to have 2 supplies in the room. I am hesitent to tie the return into the room as well because then the sound could go straight from the room in the basement to the main floor with a minimum of twists and turns or damping.

So I could return to the adjacent room, but then I have an air exhange issue if both doors are closed.
I am guessing if I make a seperate air exchange system then I will need to have both an INTAKE and an exhaust. I don't think both would need a fan, but at least one of them would. Code only requires 0.33 air exchanges per hour but I think 5-10 air exchanges per hour would be better considering the heat from all the people in the room.
Do I need both an intake and an exhaust for the theater room, and do they both need fans?

Looking at this fan, supposedly very nice but I have no idea how loud it would end up being.
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Suncourt-4-in-Centrifugal-Tube-Fan-with-Cord-TF104-CRD/203227202

cheap alternative, probably not as good but larger flow diameter:
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Suncourt-6-in-Duct-Fan-with-More-Powerful-Motor-DB6GTP/202797339

I would probably make a small soffit in the adjacent room to "hide" this inside.

I am also looking at building a ventilation system for the equipment rack. My plan is (2-3) 120mm computer fans providing about 80 cfm total. I would plug the power supply for these fans into the switched outlet on the back of the receiver, so that when the receiver is on the fans are running. Intake for the equipment cabinet would be drawn from inside the room, and hot air would be exhausted to an adjacent space.

Here's a concept for the equipment cabinet. The ventilation system I am thinking about isn't shown.
cabinet1.png

in-room%2520cabinet.png
Edited by djkest - 6/11/13 at 11:54am
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home